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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
McGregor J. Ferguson, an Annapolis veterinary cardiologist, died Sunday of undetermined causes at his Millersville home. He was 41. "We are waiting for a cause of death pending the results of an autopsy," said his father, Dr. Ray Ferguson of Federal Hill. McGregor John Ferguson was born in Baltimore and raised in Arnold. He was a 1989 graduate of Severna Park High School, where he played lacrosse and football. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1993 from Swarthmore College, where he was a member of the lacrosse team, he earned his veterinary degree in 1999 from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, which is part of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Date: Jan. 4 Her story: Kathryn "Katie" Thomas, 26, grew up in Frederick. She is a veterinarian at the Highland County Veterinary Hospital in Hillsboro, Ohio. Her father, Kevin Thomas, is a retired Army colonel, and her mother, Susan Thomas, is a stay-at-home mom who raised Katie and her five siblings. Her parents live in Frederick. His story: Cody Yager, 26, grew up in Tempe, Ariz. He is a veterinarian employed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. His mother, Dr. Elizabeth Yager, is a triple board-certified psychiatrist and lives in Christiansburg, Va. Their story: Katie and Cody met in September 2010 during their second year of veterinarian school at Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Va. They were both members of the Christian Veterinary Fellowship, and Cody organized a hike with the group to Cascade Falls in southwest Virginia.
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NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Thomas E. Sooy, a longtime Catonsville veterinarian, died from complications following a bone marrow stem cell transplant Oct. 9 in Seattle. He was 58. Dr. Sooy, who lived in Ellicott City, was born March 4, 1952, in Livingston, Mont., where he participated in athletics and the Boy Scouts, achieving the rank of Eagle Scout at age 13. His interest in veterinary medicine began after a Cub Scouts field trip. His mother was surprised by the announcement because he was allergic to animal dander, said his wife of more than 38 years and high school sweetheart, the former Diane Schultz.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
My dog is on a round of antibiotics for a urinary tract infection, and the medication seems to be upsetting her stomach — she doesn't want to eat much, which is very unusual. I know people can take probiotics for this, but are they safe for dogs? What can I do to help her feel better? Antibiotics can certainly cause stomach upset in some animals. The most common side effects are vomiting and/or diarrhea. If she is not eating, be sure to contact your veterinarian, as sometimes infections can worsen even while under treatment with antibiotics.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Dr. Benjamin H. Cassutto, a veterinarian and Army veteran, died Thursday of cancer at Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford, Del. The Millsboro, Del., resident was 52. The son of a minister and a Carroll County educator, Benjamin Henricus Cassutto was born in Passaic, N.J., and was raised in the Villa Nova neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was a 1978 graduate of Milford Mill High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Cassutto earned a degree from Old Dominion University in 1983 and his veterinary degree in 1989 from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va. He enlisted in the Army and served from 1995 to 1999 as chief of the Veterinary Resources Section, Clinical Research Laboratory.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
A Mount Airy veterinarian went to Howard Circuit Court yesterday to dispute criminal charges that he mistreated two cows at his farm in January 1992.Richard John Burroughs, 51, is on trial for two counts of animal cruelty, offenses that give him up to 90 days in prison and $1,000 in fines if he is convicted.Dr. Burroughs was given probation, 350 hours of community service and fined $500 after he was convicted of the charges in Howard District Court in May 1993. He then appealed the conviction to Circuit Court for a jury trial.
EXPLORE
February 1, 2013
We would like to say thank you to Countryside Veterinary Clinic.  When we realized it was time to say farewell to our dog Stacey we decided we wanted her to be at home where she was comfortable and felt safe.  When we called our regular veterinarian to set up a home visit we were informed that they were swamped and no longer felt the need to extend themselves for home visits as they had previously offered.  We were feeling lost and not sure where...
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Staff Writer Staff writer Alan Craver contributed to this story | July 25, 1993
A veterinarian convicted on two counts of animal cruelty received a sentence of two years' supervised probation and 350 hours of community service, and was fined $500 in Howard County District Court Friday.Richard John Burroughs, 51, of Mount Airy, faced a maximum sentence of 90 days in prison with up to $1,000 in fines on each count of cruelty to his two cows that, District Judge Louis Becker decided May 18, were mistreated."I have to hold you to a higher standard than someone who's a farmer or a simple pet owner," Judge Becker said.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 1998
IF ALL the kids who ever dreamed of becoming veterinarians actually ended up with their degrees, there would be almost as many pet doctors in the world as there are dogs and cats.But it's as hard to earn a veterinarian degree as it is a medical degree. And with just 25 veterinary schools in the country, openings for students are scarce.The result is that most animal lovers settle for different occupations, satisfied to commune with dogs and cats after work.Susan Brennan wouldn't settle.Growing up in Severna Park, she knew from the time she was 10 that she wanted animals to be her life's work.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
Dr. David Lippincott Booth, a Carroll County veterinarian who worked for the state Department of Agriculture, died of glio-blastoma multiforme, an aggressive brain tumor, Sunday at his Westminster farm. He was 65. Born in Winchester, Va., the son of a veterinarian, he was raised on his family's farm near Middleburg, Va. After graduation in 1956 from the Quaker-founded George School in Newtown, Pa., he began his college studies at Dickinson College. After a year, he left college and worked as a technician at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and as a truck driver.
FEATURES
November 4, 2013
We have two cats, ages 13 and 17. One or both of them (we believe the older one) is leaving both urine and feces outside the litter box on an almost daily basis. We try to keep the litter clean and have no idea why he keeps on doing this. How can we retrain him?  This is a fairly common problem in cat households. Cats will go outside the litter box for several reasons. Visit your veterinarian to make sure there are no underlying medical problems, such as kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract infections or other issues.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Security at Pimlico's historic Preakness barn will be heightened this year, a move that comes amid renewed concern about doping and horse safety in the sport. All visitors, including veterinarians, who want to spend time with horses scheduled to run in this year's Preakness will have to sign in at the barn off Winner Avenue, which will have just one entrance. Those new measures, adopted by the Maryland Racing Commission and Pimlico ownership, come in addition to surveillance measures and syringe-collection practices already in place for the second leg of the Triple Crown, scheduled to be run May 18 this year.
EXPLORE
February 1, 2013
We would like to say thank you to Countryside Veterinary Clinic.  When we realized it was time to say farewell to our dog Stacey we decided we wanted her to be at home where she was comfortable and felt safe.  When we called our regular veterinarian to set up a home visit we were informed that they were swamped and no longer felt the need to extend themselves for home visits as they had previously offered.  We were feeling lost and not sure where...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Dr. Benjamin H. Cassutto, a veterinarian and Army veteran, died Thursday of cancer at Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford, Del. The Millsboro, Del., resident was 52. The son of a minister and a Carroll County educator, Benjamin Henricus Cassutto was born in Passaic, N.J., and was raised in the Villa Nova neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was a 1978 graduate of Milford Mill High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Cassutto earned a degree from Old Dominion University in 1983 and his veterinary degree in 1989 from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va. He enlisted in the Army and served from 1995 to 1999 as chief of the Veterinary Resources Section, Clinical Research Laboratory.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
McGregor J. Ferguson, an Annapolis veterinary cardiologist, died Sunday of undetermined causes at his Millersville home. He was 41. "We are waiting for a cause of death pending the results of an autopsy," said his father, Dr. Ray Ferguson of Federal Hill. McGregor John Ferguson was born in Baltimore and raised in Arnold. He was a 1989 graduate of Severna Park High School, where he played lacrosse and football. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1993 from Swarthmore College, where he was a member of the lacrosse team, he earned his veterinary degree in 1999 from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, which is part of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Veterinarians who examined Preakness winner I'll Have Another before and after the race at Pimlico Race Course said this week that he was healthy and that his medication regimen was not unusual. The New York Times reported that the colt, who also won the Kentucky Derby but scratched with a tendon injury a day before the Belmont Stakes, had suffered from osteoarthritis and was given "powerful painkillers and a synthetic joint fluid" in the days leading up to the final leg of the Triple Crown.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Maryland pet owners would receive a description of the procedures their animals undergo and a cost estimate before their veterinarian provides treatment, under a proposed regulation set to take effect before the end of the year. The Maryland Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners discussed the new informed-consent standards at Thursday's meeting as a way to head off disputes over bills. Board President Chris H. Runde said many veterinarians already ask customers to sign such forms, but the regulation will make it a requirement.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
Your article "Some pet owners fight poor treatment by vets" (April 7) is an important reminder that we can never be too careful when entrusting our beloved animal companions to others - even those who are supposed to heal them. Just as parents would never neglect to check a babysitter's references, guardians of animal companions should contact their local Better Business Bureau and state veterinary board to check for complaints before choosing a veterinarian. Always insist upon your right to stay with your animal at all times - if the vet refuses to allow you in the "back room," don't hesitate to take your animal and leave.
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