Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVeterans Affairs
IN THE NEWS

Veterans Affairs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
Eighteen months after she enlisted in the Army, Wanda Porter fell from a 50-foot tower, shattering her feet and ending her military career. Today, after three surgeries, a year in a veterans hospital, a failed marriage, bouts of depression and 17 years of therapy, Porter is taking classes at Baltimore County Community College and planning to complete a degree in psychology. She credits Veterans Affairs with helping her recover and was eager to attend a networking fair especially for women veterans at the Baltimore VA Medical Center on Saturday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
A former high-ranking Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs official pleaded guilty to extortion Monday in federal court after falsely claiming about $1.4 million in government benefits over a 16-year period. David Clark, a 67-year-old Hydes resident, admitted fabricating documents and claims to secure federal benefits and state tax waivers for himself and at least 17 other veterans. He acknowledged making up records in his role as the deputy chief of claims for the state agency, including fake doctors' letters saying that claimants suffered from diabetes and documents listing false tours of Vietnam and awards such as Purple Hearts from 1995 until his retirement in 2011.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Personal information about tens of millions of veterans might have fallen into criminal hands when someone stole the electronic data stored at the Maryland home of a federal government employee, officials announced yesterday. The burglary earlier this month could mark one of the largest thefts of data that can be used to steal someone's identity, electronic privacy experts said. The missing information contained names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth for up to 26.5 million veterans and some spouses.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
An employee at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs inappropriately stored thousands of documents - including some that contained Social Security data - according to testimony from an inspector general to be made public on Monday. About 8,000 documents, including claims folders, unprocessed mail and Social Security information of dead or incarcerated veterans were stored in an employee's office for "an extensive period of time," according to testimony from Linda A. Halliday, an assistant inspector general, that was reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The incident is one of several examples included in a scathing assessment of the department that Halliday will offer in a hearing Monday before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is looking for a few good men and women to volunteer for a battle it's waging at home — against disease. Actually, more than a few are needed. Officials overseeing health care for the nation's veterans are undertaking what may be the largest effort of its kind in the nation, to collect medical records and blood samples from a million former service members for a bank of genetic information. The idea is to give researchers enough DNA and other data to link specific genes to mental and physical maladies, from post-traumatic stress disorder to heart disease, and eventually develop new preventive measures or treatments.
NEWS
December 9, 2008
Maryland veterans who have been forced to travel long distances and wait for care at heavily used Veterans Affairs medical facilities in the state are going to get some relief. The department is planning two new outpatient clinics here - one at Fort Meade and another in northern Montgomery County. The Montgomery clinic will serve more than 4,000 veterans, while the Fort Meade facility will assist 2,500 who otherwise might have to travel to Baltimore, Perry Point or Washington for primary care, mental health services and other medical specialties.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
An employee at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs inappropriately stored thousands of documents - including some that contained Social Security data - according to testimony from an inspector general to be made public on Monday. About 8,000 documents, including claims folders, unprocessed mail and Social Security information of dead or incarcerated veterans were stored in an employee's office for "an extensive period of time," according to testimony from Linda A. Halliday, an assistant inspector general, that was reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The incident is one of several examples included in a scathing assessment of the department that Halliday will offer in a hearing Monday before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
A former high-ranking Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs official pleaded guilty to extortion Monday in federal court after falsely claiming about $1.4 million in government benefits over a 16-year period. David Clark, a 67-year-old Hydes resident, admitted fabricating documents and claims to secure federal benefits and state tax waivers for himself and at least 17 other veterans. He acknowledged making up records in his role as the deputy chief of claims for the state agency, including fake doctors' letters saying that claimants suffered from diabetes and documents listing false tours of Vietnam and awards such as Purple Hearts from 1995 until his retirement in 2011.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The mishandling of thousands of documents at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs delayed payments in excess of $25,000 to some veterans, according to new details made public Monday by the department's inspector general. Agency auditors reported widespread problems with records management in Baltimore in a three-page memo released in advance of a congressional hearing Monday evening. In one incident, they said, an employee was seen last month carrying veterans' claims folders in suitcases back to the office from her home.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
A decade after the Department of Veterans Affairs closed its hospital at Fort Howard, most of the buildings at the sprawling Baltimore County waterfront property are boarded up. A big rusty pole in front of the old facility has no flag. But there are plans to turn the site into a huge, mixed-use development for veterans and senior citizens. Nearby residents oppose the developer's proposal, but the Department of Veterans Affairs is moving forward with the project, which has the backing of elected officials.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The mishandling of thousands of documents at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs delayed payments in excess of $25,000 to some veterans, according to new details made public Monday by the department's inspector general. Agency auditors reported widespread problems with records management in Baltimore in a three-page memo released in advance of a congressional hearing Monday evening. In one incident, they said, an employee was seen last month carrying veterans' claims folders in suitcases back to the office from her home.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The Department of Veterans Affairs said Tuesday it has finalized a lease with Fort Howard Development LLC to build a “veteran-focused community” on a 94-acre site in the North Point area of Baltimore County. The site is the former home of the Fort Howard VA Medical Center, which closed in 2002. Officials said the lease clears the way for the developer to submit a proposal to Baltimore County government for review.  The VA signed an initial lease with Fort Howard Development in December 2011.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
The Sun has been covering the Department of Veterans Affairs fiasco for weeks ( "VA's acting chief tours Baltimore medical center," June 17). One idea to deal with the backlog of veterans who have been waiting for care at VA hospitals is to send them to private practitioners and pay the practitioners for their services. This would be nothing new: Veterans have always been able to access private practitioners, both specialists and internists, for their care. Unfortunately the VA system has not paid the private practitioners for services rendered.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 23, 2014
For understandable reasons, the IRS scandal has largely focused on the political question of whether the White House deliberately targeted opponents. To date there's no evidence that it did. That's good for the president, but it may not be good for the country, because if the administration didn't target opponents, that would mean the IRS has become corrupt all on its own. In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, "The Bureaucratization of the World.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The acting secretary of veterans affairs said Tuesday that the agency would add more primary care physicians to the Maryland VA Health Care System to help reduce the long waits for veterans seeking appointments with doctors. Acting Secretary Sloan Gibson said the agency would also add $500,000 - a 40 percent increase - to help veterans facing delays seek private care. Gibson, who replaced the embattled former Secretary Eric K. Shinseki last month, visited the Baltimore VA Medical Center a week after a nationwide audit showed that veterans in the Maryland system face the fourth-longest wait to schedule a first-time visit with a primary care doctor.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Veterans in Maryland scheduling a primary care appointment through the Department of Veterans Affairs for the first time wait an average of 80 days to see a doctor, making the state's system fourth-worst in the nation out of 141 systems reviewed, according to data released by the federal government. An extensive audit made public Monday as part of the agency's effort to confront a national scandal over wait times showed that the VA Maryland Health Care System performed worse on that measure than Atlanta, Dallas and Boston, where wait times averaged 64 days, 60 days and 59 days, respectively.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Honorably discharged decades ago, a former Marine was living in a Baltimore homeless shelter, surviving with the help of $255 a month for a disability he suffered while in the service. Then he met Rochelle Richardson. Richardson, an attorney who works with the Homeless Persons Representation Project to provide indigent veterans free legal counsel, learned that the man had an outstanding claim for post-traumatic stress disorder. Richardson untangled his claim and submitted others for other unreported disabilities the former Marine sustained while he was in the corps.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A former high-ranking official at the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs has been accused of running a kickback scheme from his state office, allegedly fabricating military achievements and disability claims in exchange for a cut of the resulting government payouts. According to a federal indictment made public Wednesday, David Clark secured $1.4 million in fraudulent payouts over 16 years. An Army veteran, Clark rose to deputy chief of claims at the state agency before retiring in 2011.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Claude L. Callegary, a retired Baltimore lawyer and World War II veteran who advised five U.S. presidents on veterans' affairs, died June 3 of respiratory failure at the Loch Raven Veterans Administration Living and Rehabilitation Center. He was 92. "Claude was a valued adviser as a founding member of my Veterans Advisory Board," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. "As a veteran, advocate and Marylander, he was a true patriot who always valued service over self. " "He was just a superb national head of Disabled American Veterans for a few years, and that concern continued throughout his life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.