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NEWS
February 10, 2014
Valentine's Day is a great time to say thank you to veterans throughout the country. The VA National Salute to Veteran Patients Week observance runs Feb. 9-15 and is timed to coincide with Valentine's Day to connect the holiday's sentiments of caring and sharing with expressing honor and appreciation to Veterans for their sacrifice and service. Already, Valentine cards are arriving at our three inpatient facilities to attest to the gratitude toward our nation's veterans. During this observance throughout the VA Maryland Health Care System, local community musical groups have volunteered to perform throughout our facilities, bringing their music, their talents and time to veteran inpatients.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 13, 2014
Get a haircut at Hair Cuttery on Veterans Day and help a veteran. The chain of hair salons announced today that it will donate a free haircut certificate to a veteran for every adult haircut purchased on Tuesday, Nov. 11. It will be the 15th year for the chain's Share-a-Haircut program, in which the company has offered free haircuts to the homeless, schoolchildren and victims of domestic abuse. This year, the 900-store chain will partner with local veterans groups in hopes of reaching 25,000 veterans.
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NEWS
February 16, 2014
In his State of the Union address, President Obama overlooked what should be a major priority for Washington: finding a suitable alternative to the proposed unfair cuts to veterans' pensions ( "Lawmakers take another look at military retiree cut," Jan. 5). Veterans actually earned these benefits through years of service, which is more than one can say for most government spending. Why not cut the budgets for lavish government agency conferences? There are other extravagances that could and should go on the chopping block.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Lt. Col. Earl W. Nesbitt, a retired decorated career Army officer who had fought in Vietnam and remained a staunch advocate for veterans, died Sunday at Northwest Hospital of complications from diabetes. He was 74. The son of James Robert Nesbitt Sr., a cabdriver, and Mildred Alice Johnson Nesbitt, a bar owner, Earl William Nesbitt was born and raised in South Baltimore. After graduating in 1958 from Frederick Douglass High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in biology from what is now Morgan State University.
NEWS
January 30, 2013
Speaking as a veteran who served for eight years as a Naval Reserve Officer, five in World War II and three more during the Korean Conflict, it was with tears in my eyes that I read The Sun's article, "VA falls short on helping veterans," (Jan. 27) as I sadly realized that I could have just as easily been a member of this group. In order to lend a helping hand to this national endeavor, a couple of years ago I signed up with the Wounded Warriors Project whose headquarters is located in Topeka, Kansas in order to make a monthly contribution to this worthy cause.
NEWS
October 3, 2012
Your recent article neglected to mention that the billions in budget cuts proposed by "sequestration" threaten to raise health care premiums and cuts benefit cuts for veterans ("Federal contractor? Brace yourself," Sept. 29). Young veterans recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan would be hit hardest - they depend on health care, as 50 percent have claimed some kind of disability and nearly 30 percent are unemployed, making them less able to pay higher health care costs. Instead of raiding veterans' programs and benefits, leaders in Washington need to find money elsewhere.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Social Security Administration plans to streamline its review of disability claims for veterans starting next month, shaving weeks off the process by which it determines benefits, officials are set to announce Wednesday. The Woodlawn-based agency says it will expedite claims for former service members who already have been deemed fully disabled by the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, alleviating a bureaucratic nightmare for veterans who sometimes waited years to get a decision about their eligibility for benefits.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
This July 4th finds us with servicemen and women celebrating Independence Day in other countries, carrying with them the creed that all men and women are created equal and endowed with the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Recently, President Barack Obama announced a drawback of our troops in Afghanistan. Some of those troops will continue with their military careers, while others will transition to civilian life as veterans. I urge Marylanders to be proactive in welcoming home newly-returned veterans and to participate in helping them to transition and readjust to civilian life.
NEWS
November 9, 2010
Albert Raim, my father, grew up on Lombard Street. By the end of World War II he had trained the crews who dropped the atomic bombs on Japan in how to fly their B-29s by instruments. Martin Klein, my father-in-law, grew up on Smallwood Street. He was one of the few unwounded soldiers in the first wave to make it to Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944 — D-Day. I still find it amazing that these otherwise ordinary men had such a direct impact on two of the most monumental events in world history.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Who could not be moved after reading your article on the wonderful group of young men and women who have joined in a tribute to those who truly deserve it ("Naval Academy students give aging veterans a final salute," May 3)? We owe a special thanks to midshipman Kimberly Bernardy, who has brought pride to her family and to the academy. Were I an officer in the Marine Corps, I would pull all the strings I could to get this remarkable young woman assigned to my unit. William T. Define, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis waited nine seasons, 1,365 games and 5,966 plate appearances for his first postseason at-bat. The 30-year-old admits he was rather nervous when he stepped to the plate around 6 p.m. Thursday before a soldout, screaming, orange-towel waving crowd at Camden Yards. “Absolutely, I'd be lying if I told you no,” Markakis said. “That is part of the game, part of the job. It's a matter of controlling your emotions and staying within yourself on the big stage.” Markakis watched three pitches, two balls and a strike, before taking his first hack, smacking a 93-mph fastball from Detroit Tigers starter Max Scherzer straight back to center field for his first postseason single - and the Orioles' first hit of the 2014 playoffs.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Jacoby Jones stalked from side-to-side in the end zone, measuring every step while paying no attention to the players lining up in front of him. When the ball sailed off the right foot of Carolina Panthers kicker Graham Gano, Jones sprung forward, sensing a rare opportunity. The anticipation, however, was short-lived. The kickoff landed about five yards in front of him and bounced over Jones' right shoulder to the back of the end zone for the touchback. It was yet another missed opportunity for Jones, who is having a hard time getting the ball in his hands and securing it when it does come his way. "I'm in a funk right now," an upbeat Jones said Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
While introducing Dave Wallace and Dom Chiti to Camden Yards this offseason, Orioles manager Buck Showalter pointed out the bronze statues of the team's six Hall of Famers beyond the left-center-field fence. “You know, if you two guys figure out this pitching here,” Showalter joked, “there will probably be a statue out there of you two guys.” And after the strides the pitching staff has made under Wallace, the pitching coach, and Chiti, the bullpen coach, in their first year working with the Orioles, Showalter recently joked that he's going to have to make good on his promise and give the duo miniature statues of themselves.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Joseph F. Nawrozki III, a retired investigative reporter who served on the staff of three Baltimore daily newspapers and was a Vietnam War combat veteran, died of leukemia Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 70. "Joe had a real instinct for the underdog. He looked into their hearts," said Michael Olesker, a former Baltimore Sun columnist who was Mr. Nawrozki's investigative partner at the old News American. "His working-class background and his experience in Vietnam informed everything he wrote.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Veteran running back Justin Forsett was so frustrated and disheartened following an injury-plagued season with the Jacksonville Jaguars last year that he began contemplating alternate careers and a potential exit strategy from football. Now, the Ravens and Forsett are glad he didn't pursue business ventures or player development options. The diminutive runner displayed his determined, tackle-breaking running style Sunday during a 38-10 victory over the Carolina Panthers at M&T Bank Stadium, rushing for a game-high 66 yards and a touchdown on 14 carries.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
TORONTO - The starting lineup the Orioles fielded in Friday night's 4-2 loss to the Blue Jays at the Rogers Centre was missing 98 homers and 304 RBIs. Without Nelson Cruz, Adam Jones, Steve Pearce and J.J. Hardy, the Orioles were minus a significant amount of offensive punch. In Saturday's 4 p.m. game, expect to see Nick Markakis and Alejandro De Aza taking their day of rest. And expect Orioles manager Buck Showalter to begin using the bullpen en masse behind left-hander Wei-Yin Chen.
NEWS
May 30, 2011
Ask children what Memorial Day means to them and they'll frequently say: "That's the day that the pools open. " Yet no other observance in America is more somber: It is the day we remember our war dead, pay homage to their sacrifice and courage, and recall the selflessness that embodies military service. Memorial Day also honors the families of the fallen: the mother who hears her child's 21-gun salute; the husband or wife who receives a folded flag; the young son or daughter who knows mom or dad only from a photograph.
NEWS
May 24, 2014
I find it very interesting to finally see a letter to the editor talking about the plight of veterans ( "VA is failing its veterans," May 20). I am a current resident in Baltimore but originally from Philadelphia where my father practically lives at the VA hospital. Hearing his frustrations with the whole facility has become a constant in my life and a burden on our relationship. He has been unemployed for over five years now seeking treatment so that he might recover and work again.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The pent-up frustration in Baltimore's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community with the center founded decades ago to serve their needs was on full display Tuesday night, when several local activists grilled a candidate for the center's open executive director position. Joel Tinsley-Hall, 39, a black Baltimore native and Army veteran with a husband and children, an active church life and a history working with mentally ill adults and youth, at times found himself on the defensive during the more than one-hour interview session on the second floor of the Waxter Center in Mount Vernon, where the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, is located.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
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