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Versailles

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By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
Versailles: A Novel, by Kathryn Davis. Houghton Mifflin. 224 pages. $21. Stunning. Stunningly written, lively, amusing and unpredictable. Describing this as historical fiction, a liberally retouched biography of Marie Antoinette from marriage to the last Louis at age 14 to decapitation, would utterly miss the point. This novel views through a keyhole its main character's reflection in her own white-and-gilt-trimmed hand-mirror. The facts shimmer in a haze. Usually Marie tells her own story, often eloquently, although the author occasionally interrupts to comment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mcCauley@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In John Waters' new gallery show, "Versailles," the cult filmmaker demonstrates his uncanny knack for having it both ways. Over the past half-century, Baltimore's favorite bad boy has carefully constructed an image as a provocateur. But he somehow manages to needle gently, without giving too much offense. "I travel in two completely different worlds," Waters says, "and I love them both. To me, there is no tension between the different realities. I find the contrast delightful." For instance, the title image in his new show, which runs through Feb. 27 at C. Grimaldis Gallery, is split in half.
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NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2006
In the domestic world of Mark and Susan Adams, it was necessary that an eclectic blend of artwork co-exist with French architecture and decor to produce an eye-pleasing splash of color and texture. In order to accommodate their stylized, yet functional furnishings while providing ample studio space for a working artist, the house of their dreams would need to be custom-built. And that is what happened 13 years ago. Some of the Adamses' friends call their northwest Baltimore County home "Versailles on the Hill."
NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2006
In the domestic world of Mark and Susan Adams, it was necessary that an eclectic blend of artwork co-exist with French architecture and decor to produce an eye-pleasing splash of color and texture. In order to accommodate their stylized, yet functional furnishings while providing ample studio space for a working artist, the house of their dreams would need to be custom-built. And that is what happened 13 years ago. Some of the Adamses' friends call their northwest Baltimore County home "Versailles on the Hill."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mcCauley@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In John Waters' new gallery show, "Versailles," the cult filmmaker demonstrates his uncanny knack for having it both ways. Over the past half-century, Baltimore's favorite bad boy has carefully constructed an image as a provocateur. But he somehow manages to needle gently, without giving too much offense. "I travel in two completely different worlds," Waters says, "and I love them both. To me, there is no tension between the different realities. I find the contrast delightful." For instance, the title image in his new show, which runs through Feb. 27 at C. Grimaldis Gallery, is split in half.
NEWS
July 18, 2001
4Kids Featured site of the month MAGNIFICENT VERSAILLES Take a virtual tour to France to witness the magnificence of the palace of Versailles. The Chateau de Versailles Web site at www.smartweb.fr / versailles / features many images of the gardens, the palace, the Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon and the surrounding parks. The history section will fill you in on all the major changes to Versailles, from its creation in 1038 to its role as the most sumptuous royal residence in all of Europe in the 18th century.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 17, 1991
All the components to be found in down-home Southern charm were exemplified by Albert B. "Happy" Chandler, an effervescent son of old Kentucky, who had a smile that would melt concrete. Determination, too. But the personality made him an unforgettable American figure. His extraordinary life carried into extra innings before he died at the grand age of 92.It was Chandler as commissioner of baseball, despite the fact he was from a state where blacks were then blatantly abused and segregation prevailed, who opened the game in 1947 to all men, regardless of the pigment in their skin.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 9, 1996
"The Great War" plays out across four nights and eight episodes, beginning at 9 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67. Here's a look at each chapter.Parts 1 and 2, which air tonight, look at the rampant nationalism and the gross miscalculations that led to war (Part 1, "Explosion") and how quickly the conflict degraded into trench warfare with no end in sight (Part 2, "Stalemate").Viewers will be introduced to the strutting German Kaiser Wilhelm II, who struggled to hide his withered left arm in both photographs (by concealing it)
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | May 26, 1991
The voice on the phone is low and musical; a voice of such deep timbre that it causes the slightly accented words to vibrate in your memory -- the way a cello note reverberates briefly after the bow has been lifted. There is humor in the voice, too, and a wry sensibility. It is the voice of a born storyteller and it imbues everything, even street directions, with a magical quality:You must go up the hill and down the hill and, oh, you keep on going, I don't know how long -- it is such a complicated street!
NEWS
By Diarmuid Maguireand Kenneth E. Sharpe | November 18, 1990
The war against Iraq may be a war we don't want to fight. It is certainly a war we don't want to lose. But it may also be a war we don't want to win.The issue of the potential costs of victory has at last entered American public debate. At a news conference Nov. 1, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of U.S. forces facing Iraq, focused attention not simply on why wars break out but what happens after they end.He emphasized that the goals for the United States and its allies were not simply the defense of Saudi Arabia and the liberation of Kuwait, but ultimately "to make sure that we have peace, stability and a correct balance of power in the Middle East."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
Versailles: A Novel, by Kathryn Davis. Houghton Mifflin. 224 pages. $21. Stunning. Stunningly written, lively, amusing and unpredictable. Describing this as historical fiction, a liberally retouched biography of Marie Antoinette from marriage to the last Louis at age 14 to decapitation, would utterly miss the point. This novel views through a keyhole its main character's reflection in her own white-and-gilt-trimmed hand-mirror. The facts shimmer in a haze. Usually Marie tells her own story, often eloquently, although the author occasionally interrupts to comment.
NEWS
July 18, 2001
4Kids Featured site of the month MAGNIFICENT VERSAILLES Take a virtual tour to France to witness the magnificence of the palace of Versailles. The Chateau de Versailles Web site at www.smartweb.fr / versailles / features many images of the gardens, the palace, the Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon and the surrounding parks. The history section will fill you in on all the major changes to Versailles, from its creation in 1038 to its role as the most sumptuous royal residence in all of Europe in the 18th century.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 9, 1996
"The Great War" plays out across four nights and eight episodes, beginning at 9 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67. Here's a look at each chapter.Parts 1 and 2, which air tonight, look at the rampant nationalism and the gross miscalculations that led to war (Part 1, "Explosion") and how quickly the conflict degraded into trench warfare with no end in sight (Part 2, "Stalemate").Viewers will be introduced to the strutting German Kaiser Wilhelm II, who struggled to hide his withered left arm in both photographs (by concealing it)
FEATURES
By Ellen Sweets and Ellen Sweets,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 11, 1996
Want a little change from the urban pace of Paris? Try the royal palace at Versailles, just 20 miles or so down the road. It is an extraordinary study in how to develop a big piece of property to its best advantage.The town itself, as with many little French towns, would be worth the trip even if the world's most famous palace weren't there. But the palace is there, so the day trip is a super twofer.Versailles has the requisite compact charm: narrow cobblestone streets and a central core complete with an open-air market, or marche, as the French call it.Former Chicagoan Susan Concordet has lived in Paris with her French husband, Jean, for nearly two decades, and she never tires of periodic visits to the historic little city.
SPORTS
By Newsday | August 11, 1991
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- The news of Meadow Star's withdrawal from the 111th running of the nation's oldest race for 3-year-old fillies brightened Shug McGaughey's morning. "I was not disappointed," he said from behind a smile. Versailles Treaty brightened the trainer's afternoon.Trainer Leroy Jolley elected to scratch Meadow Star from the Alabama yesterday rather than run on a muddy track. And in the absence of the filly who has won 11 of 12 races against females, Versailles Treaty's stock soared at the betting windows.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 17, 1991
All the components to be found in down-home Southern charm were exemplified by Albert B. "Happy" Chandler, an effervescent son of old Kentucky, who had a smile that would melt concrete. Determination, too. But the personality made him an unforgettable American figure. His extraordinary life carried into extra innings before he died at the grand age of 92.It was Chandler as commissioner of baseball, despite the fact he was from a state where blacks were then blatantly abused and segregation prevailed, who opened the game in 1947 to all men, regardless of the pigment in their skin.
NEWS
September 13, 1990
There is an old cliche that the peace treaties of one war are the causes of the next. Versailles is the preeminent case in point. At the end of World War I, the allies sheared off Germany's colonies, reduced its army to 100,000 men, denied it an air force, occupied part of the Rhineland, imposed huge reparations payments, permitted France upon non-payment to take over the industrial Ruhr and left Germany prostrate and Hitler-prone. So much for all the glittering ceremonies and Wilsonian rhetoric at Louis XIV's Versailles.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | May 26, 1991
The voice on the phone is low and musical; a voice of such deep timbre that it causes the slightly accented words to vibrate in your memory -- the way a cello note reverberates briefly after the bow has been lifted. There is humor in the voice, too, and a wry sensibility. It is the voice of a born storyteller and it imbues everything, even street directions, with a magical quality:You must go up the hill and down the hill and, oh, you keep on going, I don't know how long -- it is such a complicated street!
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