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Vernon Jordan

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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton's longtime friend called a news conference to try to explain away his role in the burgeoning White House sex scandal, his opening line was so obvious he had trouble delivering it with a straight face."
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
It was important, or so they kept telling us.It was not about sex. Or so they kept telling us.They also told us that President Clinton was gone, he was toast (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges -- Stephanopoulos and Will -- c. February 1998). They said he was here to stay forever, he was invincible. (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges, c. November 1998.) And then -- but you get the point.Now that it appears to be all but over -- this scandal has roared back to life more times than Michael Myers, the masked killer in the "Halloween" movies -- it turns out they were right about one thing -- it's not about sex. It's about trivia.
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NEWS
October 30, 1997
AS A JOURNALIST and spokesman for the National Urban League and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, James D. Williams Jr. had no peer. For more than four decades, his was the authoritative voice to whom many of us in newspapers turned for answers and guidance.Mr. Williams, who died Friday at the age of 70, was not only a journalist of the highest quality but a soft-spoken gentleman and scholar of the civil rights movement and African American life in Baltimore and beyond.
NEWS
By Kenneth Gormley | October 13, 1998
IN STRADDLING the line between serving as a neutral independent prosecutor and a warmup act for Congress' impeachment exercises, Kenneth Starr may have surrendered any chance to prosecute President Clinton fairly for alleged crimes when this scandal burns out.Mr. Starr's enthusiastic disclosure of Mr. Clinton's grand jury testimony to Congress, and its subsequent publication and broadcast worldwide, may score points on the political path leading to impeachment proceedings, but it erodes any chance of affording Mr. Clinton basic due process rights if Mr. Starr attempts to criminally prosecute the president later.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Vernon Jordan, a top Washington lawyer and longtime confidant of President Clinton, apparently directed Monica Lewinsky to destroy evidence of her relationship with Clinton, according to the Starr report made public yesterday.Although Jordan testified under oath that both Clinton and Lewinsky lied to him and told him they were not sexually involved, Jordan suspected they were, according to the report."You're in love, that's what your problem is," Jordan told Lewinsky last December, after she had complained to him that she got angry at the president "when he doesn't call me enough or see me enough."
NEWS
By FEDERAL NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
Here are excerpts from President Clinton's interview with PBS' Jim Lehrer:Lehrer: The news of this day is that Kenneth Starr, independent counsel, is investigating allegations that you suborned perjury by encouraging a former White House intern, to lie under oath in a civil deposition about her having had an affair with you.Mr. President, is that true?Clinton: That is not true. That is not true. I did not ask anyone to tell anything other than the truth. There is no improper relationship.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Barry Johnson and Jeff King boast no clients, haven't taken the bar exam and do their best work in the library. They are law students. But for a summer, as they stride the halls of one of this city's most politically connected law firms, they are also something else:Power brokers in training.The two are among hundreds of attorneys-to-be who migrate here every year to work as summer associates -- law students recruited for a few months to research case law, do lunch and otherwise try on the life of the Washington lawyer.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
It was important, or so they kept telling us.It was not about sex. Or so they kept telling us.They also told us that President Clinton was gone, he was toast (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges -- Stephanopoulos and Will -- c. February 1998). They said he was here to stay forever, he was invincible. (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges, c. November 1998.) And then -- but you get the point.Now that it appears to be all but over -- this scandal has roared back to life more times than Michael Myers, the masked killer in the "Halloween" movies -- it turns out they were right about one thing -- it's not about sex. It's about trivia.
NEWS
By Kenneth Gormley | October 13, 1998
IN STRADDLING the line between serving as a neutral independent prosecutor and a warmup act for Congress' impeachment exercises, Kenneth Starr may have surrendered any chance to prosecute President Clinton fairly for alleged crimes when this scandal burns out.Mr. Starr's enthusiastic disclosure of Mr. Clinton's grand jury testimony to Congress, and its subsequent publication and broadcast worldwide, may score points on the political path leading to impeachment proceedings, but it erodes any chance of affording Mr. Clinton basic due process rights if Mr. Starr attempts to criminally prosecute the president later.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 31, 1992
Washington. -- The embryonic Clinton administration is already illustrating a paradox: Sometimes a par- ty's irresponsibility is a reason for giving it responsibility. Thus the 1992 election may do for Democrats what the 1952 election did for Republicans -- force them to temper their righteousness.By 1952, Republicans, losers of five consecutive presidential elections, were, with Joe McCarthy and others in Congress, demonstrating that prolonged absence from executive power tends to corrupt a party.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Scott Shane and Marcia Myers and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- One was the president's gatekeeper. The other was his pal.Betty Currie, the oh-so-confidential secretary, and Vernon Jordan, the quintessential Washington fixer, were like nothing so much as a political bomb squad as they struggled fruitlessly to defuse the Monica Lewinsky disaster.Hundreds of pages of transcripts of their grand jury testimony released yesterday show that as this pair moved to protect the president in managing Lewinsky, they often engaged in a delicate two-step that protected themselves as well.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Vernon Jordan, a top Washington lawyer and longtime confidant of President Clinton, apparently directed Monica Lewinsky to destroy evidence of her relationship with Clinton, according to the Starr report made public yesterday.Although Jordan testified under oath that both Clinton and Lewinsky lied to him and told him they were not sexually involved, Jordan suspected they were, according to the report."You're in love, that's what your problem is," Jordan told Lewinsky last December, after she had complained to him that she got angry at the president "when he doesn't call me enough or see me enough."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton's longtime friend called a news conference to try to explain away his role in the burgeoning White House sex scandal, his opening line was so obvious he had trouble delivering it with a straight face."
NEWS
By FEDERAL NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
Here are excerpts from President Clinton's interview with PBS' Jim Lehrer:Lehrer: The news of this day is that Kenneth Starr, independent counsel, is investigating allegations that you suborned perjury by encouraging a former White House intern, to lie under oath in a civil deposition about her having had an affair with you.Mr. President, is that true?Clinton: That is not true. That is not true. I did not ask anyone to tell anything other than the truth. There is no improper relationship.
NEWS
October 30, 1997
AS A JOURNALIST and spokesman for the National Urban League and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, James D. Williams Jr. had no peer. For more than four decades, his was the authoritative voice to whom many of us in newspapers turned for answers and guidance.Mr. Williams, who died Friday at the age of 70, was not only a journalist of the highest quality but a soft-spoken gentleman and scholar of the civil rights movement and African American life in Baltimore and beyond.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Barry Johnson and Jeff King boast no clients, haven't taken the bar exam and do their best work in the library. They are law students. But for a summer, as they stride the halls of one of this city's most politically connected law firms, they are also something else:Power brokers in training.The two are among hundreds of attorneys-to-be who migrate here every year to work as summer associates -- law students recruited for a few months to research case law, do lunch and otherwise try on the life of the Washington lawyer.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Scott Shane and Marcia Myers and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- One was the president's gatekeeper. The other was his pal.Betty Currie, the oh-so-confidential secretary, and Vernon Jordan, the quintessential Washington fixer, were like nothing so much as a political bomb squad as they struggled fruitlessly to defuse the Monica Lewinsky disaster.Hundreds of pages of transcripts of their grand jury testimony released yesterday show that as this pair moved to protect the president in managing Lewinsky, they often engaged in a delicate two-step that protected themselves as well.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Voting strictly along party lines, the House Judiciary Committee recommended last night the third presidential impeachment inquiry in U.S. history, after Republican investigators laid out 15 offenses that could ultimately end Bill Clinton's presidency.The committee's momentous vote came after a grueling day of contentious debate over the gravity of Clinton's sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky and allegations that he lied under oath and tried to obstruct justice.All 21 committee Republicans voted to convene a formal impeachment inquiry, and all 16 Democrats opposed it.With the full House expected to ratify the committee's recommendation by Friday, Rep. Henry J. Hyde, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, still held out the possibility of bipartisan agreements once impeachment hearings begin -- possibly by mid-November.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 31, 1992
Washington. -- The embryonic Clinton administration is already illustrating a paradox: Sometimes a par- ty's irresponsibility is a reason for giving it responsibility. Thus the 1992 election may do for Democrats what the 1952 election did for Republicans -- force them to temper their righteousness.By 1952, Republicans, losers of five consecutive presidential elections, were, with Joe McCarthy and others in Congress, demonstrating that prolonged absence from executive power tends to corrupt a party.
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