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By JOHN STEADMAN | January 30, 2000
ATLANTA -- With respect to age, Dick Vermeil is proving most emphatically that the game hasn't passed him by. Such a demeaning allegation insinuated his ability had gone out of style and the sidelines were no place for a man old enough to be the grandfather of his players. As it is, he has 10 of his own grandchildren, maybe a record for a competing Super Bowl coach. The success of the St. Louis Rams (nee Los Angeles Rams, nee Cleveland Rams) belies what the critics were saying when he was hired three years ago. Just another recycled football coach past his prime, a figurehead taking up space.
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SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Joe Gibbs and Dick Vermeil are not above acting below their age. At 64 and 68 years of age, respectively, Gibbs and Vermeil are the two oldest head coaches in the NFL. Yet within the friendly confines of their teams' headquarters, the two act like the players who are generally 40 years younger. Redskins@Chiefs Today, 1 p.m., Chs. 45, 5, 1430 AM, 106.7 FM Line: Chiefs by 6 Keys to the game HOLMES AND JOHNSON Washington's run defense has given up an alarming 284 yards in the past two games.
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SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | January 1, 1995
It was Page 1 news in Philadelphia on Christmas morning that a man bearing gifts might be arriving in town soon.Santa Claus?No way. They've booed him in Philadelphia.The excitement was about the possibility that Dick Vermeil might be ready to come home.When Vermeil was inducted into the Eagles' Honor Roll on Dec. 18, he got a warm welcome from the fans at Veterans Stadium.After all, he is the only coach to take the Eagles to the Super Bowl, and they're passionate about the Eagles in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 8, 2004
Turns out Ricky Williams wasn't the only former University of Texas running back who considered bolting from NFL ranks this summer. Unlike Williams, however, Priest Holmes didn't disappear through a rabbit hole and leave his team hanging. Williams shocked not only the Miami Dolphins but also the rest of the league with his retirement a week before training camp. Long before that, Holmes, one of the league's premier backs with the Kansas City Chiefs, went to coach Dick Vermeil to express uncertainty over his future.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2000
ATLANTA -- Dick Vermeil started out his coaching career as an assistant in high school making $5,300 a year in 1956. Jeff Fisher started his coaching career as an assistant coach in the NFL under Buddy Ryan in Philadelphia in 1986 and has never coached on any other level. That's just one of the many differences between the two coaches who'll match wits Sunday in Super Bowl XXXIV when the St. Louis Rams play the Tennessee Titans. They're men of different generations -- Vermeil is 63 and Fisher is 41 -- and different philosophies, but they had one thing in common when they started this season.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
There are no shortcuts in the NFL, which is why it has taken Dick Vermeil three years in each of his refurbishing projects to produce a winner. In Philadelphia, the Eagles ended an 18-year playoff drought in 1978 - Vermeil's third season as coach. In St. Louis, the Rams leaped from perennial loser to Super Bowl champion in 1999 - his third season. And this year - Vermeil's third with Kansas City - he has the rejuvenated Chiefs in position to end a five-year postseason drought. Yesterday's 17-10 victory over the Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium was further evidence that Vermeil has a gift for resuscitating downtrodden football teams.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
ATLANTA -- Dick Vermeil made a surprising admission yesterday. The St. Louis Rams' coach conceded the Rams' fifth-place schedule was a factor in the team's drive to the Super Bowl. In his final news conference before his team faces the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV tomorrow, Vermeil said, "Our schedule was not as demanding as many teams played this year. We were able to gain some confidence as you go along and beat some teams." Not only did the Rams fail to beat a team with a winning record during the regular season, but they faced one team ranked among the top 12 in defensive yardage allowed -- the Ravens in the season opener -- before they were held to a touchdown by Tampa Bay's third-ranked defense last week in the NFC championship game.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
ATLANTA -- For most losing teams, the easy solution is to fire the coach. The St. Louis Rams did it a different way. Instead of changing the coach, they persuaded the coach to change his ways. The Rams' remarkable one-year turnaround from the losingest team in the decade to the Super Bowl is a blueprint for losing teams trying to find a way to win. They had the King Midas touch in the off-season. It all started when president John Shaw decided to give Dick Vermeil a third year as the team's coach.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Just 10 months ago, Dick Vermeil was too old-school to win in today's high-tech NFL.In December, the coach of the somnolent St. Louis Rams was derided for his exhausting practices, his old-fashioned approach and a two-year record of 9-23.But that was before Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk. It was before Vermeil caught lightning in a bottle with a big-play offense. And it was before he won back his players with a scaled-back training camp.Vindication arrived for Vermeil and the Rams this fall with five straight wins and a revamped lineup.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
ST. LOUIS -- Dick Vermeil is an emotional guy, so it wasn't surprising that his voice cracked and he was choking back tears yesterday when he talked about his quarterback, Kurt Warner.In the wake of the St. Louis Rams' 27-10 victory over the Ravens, the coach said, "I'm very proud of him. Great kid. Just a great ," as he fought to keep his composure."It's so exciting to see a guy just come up from nowhere. You talk about coming from nowhere. Stick with it. Stay with it. The persistence through the Arena League, the World League, probably the lowest-paid quarterback in the NFL."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
There are no shortcuts in the NFL, which is why it has taken Dick Vermeil three years in each of his refurbishing projects to produce a winner. In Philadelphia, the Eagles ended an 18-year playoff drought in 1978 - Vermeil's third season as coach. In St. Louis, the Rams leaped from perennial loser to Super Bowl champion in 1999 - his third season. And this year - Vermeil's third with Kansas City - he has the rejuvenated Chiefs in position to end a five-year postseason drought. Yesterday's 17-10 victory over the Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium was further evidence that Vermeil has a gift for resuscitating downtrodden football teams.
SPORTS
By SAINT PAUL (MINN.) PIONEER PRESS | August 1, 2003
RIVER FALLS, Wis. - The final of four feisty scrimmages ended on an angry note as Chiefs coach Dick Vermeil suggested a Vikings rookie be shot in the head for a damaging hit. During a passing scrimmage, Kansas City backup receiver Dameane Douglas appeared to severely damage his lower leg after a hit by Vikings rookie free-agent cornerback Rushen Jones. The extent of Douglas' injury was not immediately known. While on the grass, Douglas said his leg was cracked. Vermeil was furious with Jones.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Dick Vermeil went shopping for an imitation of Marshall Faulk for his Kansas City Chiefs some 21 months ago and found an original instead. Priest Holmes wasn't just an offensive threat last year, he became the NFL rushing champion. He isn't just a piece of the Chiefs' playoff puzzle this year, he's the cornerstone. Holmes' startling, two-year run to a new elevation among the league's premier running backs does not surprise the original. "People always ask, `Does it surprise you how you're playing now?
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2001
The unanimity was what grabbed Dick Vermeil. Three different players from the Ravens' Super Bowl team passed through Kansas City in free agency last spring and each one unfailingly praised Priest Holmes. Vermeil, the new coach of the Chiefs, didn't have to ask twice. He targeted the Ravens' reserve running back over another popular free agent, Charlie Garner, gave him a five-year, $7.548 million contract and watched Holmes become the biggest free-agent steal of the year. In a season that came out of nowhere, Holmes leads the NFL in rushing with 1,146 yards and in total yards from scrimmage with 1,635.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2001
If anyone knows what Marty Schottenheimer is feeling, it's Dick Vermeil. The two longtime coaches, who personify the word "driven" in their own way, each stepped away from the NFL, seemingly never to return, only to be lured back by the game's siren call. And as the two meet today at FedEx Field, with Schottenheimer's Washington Redskins playing host to Vermeil's Kansas City Chiefs, the longtime friends, who bonded when Vermeil did color commentary on Chiefs preseason games while Schottenheimer coached the team from 1989 to '98, have something else in common: Neither has a win. Those who have played for both of them notice clear similarities.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and By Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2000
Each time Matt Stover, a devout Christian, kicks a field goal for the Ravens, he points to the heavens with both index fingers, "giving glory to God," he says. The Lord must go for this: Stover has hit 19 of 21 field-goal tries this season, is the leading scorer among NFL kickers and has accounted for the Ravens' past 33 points. Maybe Ove Johansson should have tried pointing skyward. Or maybe he should have sacrificed a fatted calf, practiced Santeria, or studied telekinesis with Uri Geller.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2001
If anyone knows what Marty Schottenheimer is feeling, it's Dick Vermeil. The two longtime coaches, who personify the word "driven" in their own way, each stepped away from the NFL, seemingly never to return, only to be lured back by the game's siren call. And as the two meet today at FedEx Field, with Schottenheimer's Washington Redskins playing host to Vermeil's Kansas City Chiefs, the longtime friends, who bonded when Vermeil did color commentary on Chiefs preseason games while Schottenheimer coached the team from 1989 to '98, have something else in common: Neither has a win. Those who have played for both of them notice clear similarities.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2001
The unanimity was what grabbed Dick Vermeil. Three different players from the Ravens' Super Bowl team passed through Kansas City in free agency last spring and each one unfailingly praised Priest Holmes. Vermeil, the new coach of the Chiefs, didn't have to ask twice. He targeted the Ravens' reserve running back over another popular free agent, Charlie Garner, gave him a five-year, $7.548 million contract and watched Holmes become the biggest free-agent steal of the year. In a season that came out of nowhere, Holmes leads the NFL in rushing with 1,146 yards and in total yards from scrimmage with 1,635.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 30, 2000
ATLANTA -- With respect to age, Dick Vermeil is proving most emphatically that the game hasn't passed him by. Such a demeaning allegation insinuated his ability had gone out of style and the sidelines were no place for a man old enough to be the grandfather of his players. As it is, he has 10 of his own grandchildren, maybe a record for a competing Super Bowl coach. The success of the St. Louis Rams (nee Los Angeles Rams, nee Cleveland Rams) belies what the critics were saying when he was hired three years ago. Just another recycled football coach past his prime, a figurehead taking up space.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
ATLANTA -- Dick Vermeil made a surprising admission yesterday. The St. Louis Rams' coach conceded the Rams' fifth-place schedule was a factor in the team's drive to the Super Bowl. In his final news conference before his team faces the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV tomorrow, Vermeil said, "Our schedule was not as demanding as many teams played this year. We were able to gain some confidence as you go along and beat some teams." Not only did the Rams fail to beat a team with a winning record during the regular season, but they faced one team ranked among the top 12 in defensive yardage allowed -- the Ravens in the season opener -- before they were held to a touchdown by Tampa Bay's third-ranked defense last week in the NFC championship game.
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