Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVerizon Communications
IN THE NEWS

Verizon Communications

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
Brenda E. Smith, a Verizon Communications Inc. executive who loved golf and dancing, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday at her home in Mitchellville. She was 57. Born Brenda Eaton, she grew up in the Cherry Hill section of Baltimore, and attended the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. After graduating, she returned to Baltimore and in 1969 became a home economics teacher at Western High School. While there she helped found the Fashionette Club, a group that encourages style-conscious young women to further themselves.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
Verizon's union employees in Maryland and across the region will head back to work early next week after a deal was reached to extend their expired contract pending further negotiations, the company said Saturday in a statement. About 45,000 workers in nine Northeastern states and Washington, D.C. went on strike when their contracts with Verizon Communications Inc. expired two weeks ago. The workers, technicians and customer support employees began negotiating with Verizon in June.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
With predictions looming of the longest strike to hit the phone industry in a generation - long before competition from cell phones or e-mail - Verizon Communications Inc. and two unions representing tens of thousands of its workers remain at odds over job security issues as the clock ticks down on a contract due to expire at midnight tomorrow. About 79,000 Verizon workers from Maine to Virginia - including 7,200 in Maryland - are poised to strike if the two sides can't reach an agreement by tomorrow night, an outcome that industry analysts contend is very likely.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even more people will be able to hear Verizon Wireless after the company announced yesterday that it had agreed to buy Alltel Corp. for $5.9 billion plus a mound of debt. By acquiring Alltel, Verizon Wireless would leapfrog AT&T Inc. to become the nation's largest cellular carrier. But consumers might not like the sound of another wireless provider biting the dust. "There's not enough aggressive competition in the wireless industry as it is, and this would take out one of the better players," said Bob Williams, a telecommunications expert at Consumers Union, the nonprofit publisher of Consumer Reports.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2008
Ciena Corp. Shares of the Linthicum-based maker of networking equipment fell 47 cents to $26.10 after an analyst said Verizon Communications Inc. may spend less than expected on new projects with Ciena.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2005
Verizon Communications may sell or spin off its phone book business to pay for expansion in wireless service and high-speed Internet connections. A sale may fetch as much as $19 billion, said J.P. Morgan Securities Inc.'s Jonathan Chaplin, marking the biggest directory deal ever. The unit has 7,300 employees and $3.6 billion in annual revenue, New York-based Verizon said in a statement late Sunday. The decision would free Verizon CEO Ivan G. Seidenberg to work on fast-growing services such as television and high-speed Web access while demand for directory advertising slows.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 28, 2004
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications Inc., the largest U.S. provider of phone services, said yesterday that its second-quarter profit rose more than fivefold as a surge in wireless sales drove its biggest revenue gain since 2001. Net income rose to $1.8 billion, or 64 cents a share, from $338 million, or 12 cents, in the second quarter last year, when costs for an asset sale hurt earnings. Sales rose 6 percent in the quarter to $17.8 billion, compared with $16.8 billion a year ago, the company said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 31, 2005
NEW YORK - A federal judge dismissed yesterday antitrust lawsuits claiming that Cingular Wireless LLC, Verizon Communications Inc. and two other mobile phone companies illegally forced customers to buy phones that only worked on their own networks. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote threw out allegations in a group of lawsuits claiming that the requirements constitute an illegal tying arrangement under antitrust law. "The plaintiffs have not presented sufficient evidence to prove that any one defendant has the degree of market power necessary to sustain a tying claim or show that any of the defendants' alleged tying arrangements has an actual adverse effect on competition in the U.S. market for wireless handsets," Cote wrote in a 63-page decision.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 2000
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications, the No. 1 U.S. local-telephone company, said yesterday that it will grant 210,000 employees options to buy 55 million shares of stock to give them a stake in the carrier's financial performance. The "Founders' Grant" options are priced at $43.34 per share, about equal to the current share price, the company said. They will vest in three years. Recipients will include certain hourly, salaried and part-time workers on Verizon's U.S. payroll and some international and overseas employees.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even more people will be able to hear Verizon Wireless after the company announced yesterday that it had agreed to buy Alltel Corp. for $5.9 billion plus a mound of debt. By acquiring Alltel, Verizon Wireless would leapfrog AT&T Inc. to become the nation's largest cellular carrier. But consumers might not like the sound of another wireless provider biting the dust. "There's not enough aggressive competition in the wireless industry as it is, and this would take out one of the better players," said Bob Williams, a telecommunications expert at Consumers Union, the nonprofit publisher of Consumer Reports.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2008
Ciena Corp. Shares of the Linthicum-based maker of networking equipment fell 47 cents to $26.10 after an analyst said Verizon Communications Inc. may spend less than expected on new projects with Ciena.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 1, 2007
Can I expect my Verizon Communications Inc. shares to continue to go up? - L.R., via the Internet This attractive, aggressive telecommunications giant faces continuing industry challenges. The latest attempt to snare its customers is archrival AT&T Inc.'s offering of the much-publicized Apple Inc. iPhone. Verizon Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ivan Seidenberg insists that this new product will not alter his own firm's steady game plan. Verizon (VZ) boasts a strong balance sheet, and its shares are up 10 percent this year after gaining 24 percent last year.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2005
Verizon Communications may sell or spin off its phone book business to pay for expansion in wireless service and high-speed Internet connections. A sale may fetch as much as $19 billion, said J.P. Morgan Securities Inc.'s Jonathan Chaplin, marking the biggest directory deal ever. The unit has 7,300 employees and $3.6 billion in annual revenue, New York-based Verizon said in a statement late Sunday. The decision would free Verizon CEO Ivan G. Seidenberg to work on fast-growing services such as television and high-speed Web access while demand for directory advertising slows.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 31, 2005
NEW YORK - A federal judge dismissed yesterday antitrust lawsuits claiming that Cingular Wireless LLC, Verizon Communications Inc. and two other mobile phone companies illegally forced customers to buy phones that only worked on their own networks. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote threw out allegations in a group of lawsuits claiming that the requirements constitute an illegal tying arrangement under antitrust law. "The plaintiffs have not presented sufficient evidence to prove that any one defendant has the degree of market power necessary to sustain a tying claim or show that any of the defendants' alleged tying arrangements has an actual adverse effect on competition in the U.S. market for wireless handsets," Cote wrote in a 63-page decision.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Two developments yesterday will likely have a major impact on the continued shift from land-line to wireless telephones: The $71 billion merger of Sprint Corp. and Nextel Communications Inc. into the third-largest wireless carrier and federal regulators' vote to free the four big regional Bells from having to cheaply lease their networks to competitors. The creation of Sprint Nextel, which will be based in Reston, Va., will further consolidate the wireless phone industry. Pending federal approval, the new company would follow Cingular, which two months ago completed a merger with AT&T Wireless Services Inc., and Verizon Wireless.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 28, 2004
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications Inc., the largest U.S. provider of phone services, said yesterday that its second-quarter profit rose more than fivefold as a surge in wireless sales drove its biggest revenue gain since 2001. Net income rose to $1.8 billion, or 64 cents a share, from $338 million, or 12 cents, in the second quarter last year, when costs for an asset sale hurt earnings. Sales rose 6 percent in the quarter to $17.8 billion, compared with $16.8 billion a year ago, the company said.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 10, 2001
"DON'T create your own financial crisis in the wake of the terrorist attacks," we hear from Charles Kadlic, investment adviser and author of Dow 30,000, Fact or Fiction? "Don't try to outsmart the market by jumping into one stock or sector. The market adjusts to perceived economic risks, this time falling 7 percent on the day trading resumed after the attacks - but then it stabilized. "Fear, greed and emotional investing are enemies of financial well-being. A well-crafted, long-term plan should hold up when negative surprises strike.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
The strike against Verizon Communications passed uneventfully through its seventh day yesterday, with disagreements over forced overtime, workplace stress and job security continuing to hinder a contract agreement. Increasingly, the unions' resolve seems to surprise Verizon, which had predicted on Thursday a quick end to the strike. Though company officials remained hopeful as late as last night that a deal could be reached before the end of the weekend, the downbeat tenor of the company's daily conference call yesterday greatly contrasted with the more upbeat projections of recent days.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
The phone industry is in for another shake-up. FCC rules expired midnight yesterday that forced regional phone companies to lease their lines and equipment to competitors at wholesale rates. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist on Monday rejected an emergency request to continue the rules in effect until the high court decides whether to consider the appeal of AT&T, MCI and others. His refusal let stand the June 15 expiration deadline imposed by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 22, 2003
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications Inc., the nation's largest regional phone company, asked union employees to shoulder more of their health care costs in exchange for a promise that it wouldn't lay off workers until late 2004. Verizon made the offers in contract talks with two unions representing 78,000 Verizon workers from Virginia to Maine, according to a letter sent this week by Verizon Chief Executive Officer Ivan G. Seidenberg to U.S. senators and obtained by Bloomberg News. The document offers a glimpse into negotiations that started mid-June and have remained largely under wraps.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.