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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
The verdict was in on Anthony Sylvester Fair: Guilty on two counts of murder. Then the clerk polled the jury, and the East Baltimore teen-ager wasn't so guilty -- at least for a while.The unusual turn of events yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court began after the first nine jurors who were polled said that they agreed with the guilty verdict. Fair's mother sobbed.The clerk then turned to Juror No. 10 and asked the usually perfunctory question: "You have heard the verdict of your forelady -- is your verdict the same as hers?"
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NEWS
By MARK I. PINSKY | August 13, 1995
Many Baltimoreans were outraged when a city jury recently acquitted Davon A. Neverdon in connection with the 1993 street robbery and slaying of Joel E. Lee, a Towson State University student.The verdict sparked outrage from the victim's Korean-born parents, who blamed racism for the "not guilty" verdict.Mr. Neverdon is black, and a predominantly black jury rejected the testimony of four eyewitnesses who claimed to have watched Mr. Neverdon shoot Mr. Lee. Two other witnesses also linked Mr. Neverdon to the slaying.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
For the second time this summer, a local family has been awarded a huge sum of money by a Baltimore jury after claiming that negligent care by a local hospital caused their child to be born with a disability. A jury Tuesday awarded $21 million to a Glen Burnie couple whose son was born prematurely with cerebral palsy at Harbor Hospital in 2002, and is now, at age 9, "literally trapped inside his body" with a fully functioning mind but a severely disabled body, according to a family attorney.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
The post-trial discovery that one of the jurors who convicted a 33-year-old Columbia man of murder last month was not a U.S. citizen should not invalidate the verdict because there is no evidence that the juror's presence denied the defendant a "fair and impartial" trial, a Howard County prosecutor said in court papers. The juror, a resident alien from Nigeria, has said he never intended to deceive anyone and just "missed" references to citizenship on a juror questionnaire. And some courts across the country have ruled that, barring proof of prejudice, a defendant cannot challenge a juror's qualification to serve after a verdict has been returned, Senior Assistant State's Attorney Mary Murphy wrote in court papers filed Friday.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
Just minutes after former Baltimore County Councilman Gary Huddles was acquitted of misusing campaign funds, his attorneys issued a press release.Huddles' attorneys, the release said, "left the courtroom victorious."The attorneys, Robert B. Schulman and Joshua R. Treem, were so confident of victory that they had prepared the press release before Circuit Court Judge Barbara K. Howe rendered her verdict yesterday after a two-day trial in Towson."We were correct when we originally stated that he was the victim of a vindictive, biased and ill-conceived prosecution by Stephen Montanarelli, state prosecutor," the statement read.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
OFFICER Kevon M. Gavin was fatally crushed when a Ford Bronco rammed into his patrol car at 104 miles an hour. Was it murder or vehicular manslaughter? Neither, according to a Baltimore City jury, which acquitted an 18-year-old budding career criminal named Eric D. Stennett of all charges stemming from last April's high-speed collision. This verdict has been greeted with shock and disbelief. Even Mr. Stennett's lawyer told the jury his client was not entirely innocent. "I'm not saying this young man should walk out of here," lawyer A. Dwight Pettit said, seeming to argue for conviction on a lesser charge.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 19, 1993
Most people are feeling pretty good about the verdict in the Rodney King beating trial. Maybe too good.It was almost as if the jurors wanted to make everyone happy.If you think about it, the verdict offered something for just about everybody. Those who believe police are too often out of control got two convictions. Those who believe police face a tough job that many don't appreciate saw two cops go free. Most of all, L.A. avoided a riot.The jury did its job. Peace came to the land. And justice was done.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
A bomb scare at the Carroll County courthouse yesterday didn't stop a jury from deliberating the case of a Sykesville woman accused of child abuse and battery.The jury of nine women and three men moved to a nearby church for about 90 minutes and returned to Carroll County Circuit Court with a verdict, finding the 44-year-old woman guilty of battery, but not guilty of child abuse.The woman, who is not being named to protect the privacy of the victim, was accused of kicking a child, now 9 years old, and beating him with a belt on two occasions early last year.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 9, 1994
Rodney King I, Imelda Marcos, the Menendez brothers, the Branch Davidians -- the visible examples of something wrong with our jury system come too numerously to mind.How can cases like these happen time after time? Is it that the jury system is hopelessly flawed and that its day has passed? In Britain, only 5 percent of all criminal cases and 1 per cent of all civil cases are handled by juries now.But in America, we are much more likely to dispense with the wisdom and prejudices of judges for the humanity and prejudices of a collection of our fellow citizens.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 28, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Most foresighted communities are already getting ready for the riots that will follow the verdict in the O. J. Simpson trial, and ours is no exception.Proper preparation takes a lot of planning. Obviously, the nature of the Simpson verdict will determine who riots, and where, so because the verdict isn't in yet a lot of contingencies have to be anticipated. But thanks to a spirit of goodwill and democratic cooperation among the prospective rioters, we think we have our local bases covered.
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