Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVerdi
IN THE NEWS

Verdi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janell Cannon | August 1, 1999
Editor's note: A young python doesn't want to grow up and become slow and boring like the older snakes in the tropical jungle where he lives.On a small tropical island, the sun rose high above the steamy jungle. A mother python was sending her hatchlings out into the forest the way all mother pythons do. "Grow up big and green -- as green as the trees' leaves," she called to her little yellow babies as they happily scattered among the trees.But Verdi dawdled. Why the hurry to grow up big and green?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The first public hearing in 143 years of Franco Faccio's “Amleto,” presented Thursday night by Baltimore Concert Opera in the elegant ballroom of the Engineers Club, offered rewards and frustrations. A more meaningful judgment on whether conductor Anthony Barrese's decade-plus effort to unearth this forgotten score was well worth it will be possible for those who get to hear the fully staged production he leads later this month at Opera Southwest in Albuquerque. That performance will have a crucial ingredient missing here - an orchestra.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
If it is your destiny to be anywhere near the Kennedy Center during the next couple of weeks, check out Washington National Opera's new production of Verdi's "La forza del destino. " The force of it may surprise you -- and quite possibly thrill, confound, amuse or annoy you, too. You will certainly not be unaffected. I can well imagine opera fans raising any number of objections to director Francesca Zambello's concept (I've got one or two of them myself). But at Saturday night's opener, I found it easy to jump onto the eventful ride and let the qualms slip away, especially since the performance, featuring notable company debuts onstage and in the pit, was so electric.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
When Lyric Opera of Baltimore presents a new production of Verdi's first hit, "Nabucco," this week, there will be a guaranteed encore: The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves. "It's so good, you have to hear it again," says James Harp, the company's artistic director. That's what the first audience for "Nabucco" in 1842 at Milan's La Scala thought, too. For 172 years, this choral piece has been routinely encored at many an opera house, especially in Italy, where it enjoys the status of an unofficial national anthem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
The world has been awash in more Verdian sounds than usual this year, thanks to the preeminent Italian opera composer's bicentennial. Since Oct. 10 marks Verdi's actual 200th birthday (OK, it might have been the day before, but most sources go with the 10th), I figured I had to take extra note of the occasion. (The thumbnail photo for this blog post is the Verdi memorial on Broadway near Lincoln Center; I snapped it on Wednesday during a brief visit to New York.) Given all of the reasons why I love Verdi, I could bore you with a list of my Top 10 greatest this-and-that, those moments when his genius invariably blows me away with the curve of a melodic line, the shift of a harmony, the perfect coloring of orchestration.  But I decided to try to boil everything down to one example, one that combines the power of Verdi's music with an example of what can happen when an extra-inspired interpreter grabs hold of it. The piece is the Overture to "La forza del destino" (you can hear the whole opera starting this weekend in a new, bicentennial-saluting production from Washington National Opera)
FEATURES
By James Roos and James Roos,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 27, 1994
Since his death at 87 in 1901, Giuseppe Verdi has been portrayed as a kind of Abraham Lincoln of music: a wise, gruff yet humane man of humble origins who cared deeply about four things: music, people, farming and his beloved country.In countless biographies, Verdi venerators have described the Italian composer as a peasant from Busseto, a small town near Parma, who rivaled Wagner as the king of 19th-century opera and who rallied his countrymen in uniting Italy.He wrote 30 operas, including masterworks such as "La Traviata," "Rigoletto" and "Aida."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | April 8, 1991
IT CALLS ITSELF the Handel Choir but yesterday it was the Verdi Choir. It sang the Manzoni Requiem passionately in only the second time since the group began here in 1934 (the first Requiem was in 1971). It was 95 uninterrupted minutes of polished Verdian contrasts in the requiem that speaks of death but feels of life.Giuseppe Verdi revered text almost as much as music. So the soft descending cellos led effectively into the opening words "Grant them rest eternal, Lord." The crashing tumult of the four G minor chords of "Day of anger, day of trouble" unfolded.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Staff Writer | May 20, 1993
MILAN, Italy -- Carefully and gently, as though his life woul crumble away in his hands, Eraldo Coda unfolds the yellowing papers and points with pride."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 19, 2002
With Rigoletto, a tale of depravity, deformity, delusion, decency and devotion, Verdi reached a new peak. For all the quality at work in his previous 15 operas, it was Rigoletto that first reflected the full power of the composer's genius. Not even the brilliant works he wrote afterward overshadowed its musical and theatrical virtues. Many of those virtues could be appreciated Saturday night in the Baltimore Opera Company's production at the Lyric; fewer came through on Sunday afternoon with a different set of principal singers.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 27, 2003
In another of those rare and fortuitous alignments of local musical forces, the two greatest choral works of the 19th century will be performed in the space of two days this week - Beethoven's Missa Solemnis by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and Verdi's Requiem by the Handel Choir of Baltimore. Some people who adore Beethoven's symphonies, concertos, etc., pass over his sacred music. Likewise, you can find devoted Verdi opera fans who don't get as enthused about his setting of the ancient Latin Mass for the Dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
If it is your destiny to be anywhere near the Kennedy Center during the next couple of weeks, check out Washington National Opera's new production of Verdi's "La forza del destino. " The force of it may surprise you -- and quite possibly thrill, confound, amuse or annoy you, too. You will certainly not be unaffected. I can well imagine opera fans raising any number of objections to director Francesca Zambello's concept (I've got one or two of them myself). But at Saturday night's opener, I found it easy to jump onto the eventful ride and let the qualms slip away, especially since the performance, featuring notable company debuts onstage and in the pit, was so electric.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 11, 2013
The Columbia Orchestra starts its 36th season in a big way by performing Giuseppe Verdi's Requiem on Saturday, Oct. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. This massive composition entails having the 80-member Columbia Orchestra joined by a 100-voice choir from Northern Virginia known as Choralis. Big numbers also add up for Columbia Orchestra Music Director Jason Love, who is in his 15th year in that position. His innovative and ambitious programs during that period have not gone unnoticed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
The world has been awash in more Verdian sounds than usual this year, thanks to the preeminent Italian opera composer's bicentennial. Since Oct. 10 marks Verdi's actual 200th birthday (OK, it might have been the day before, but most sources go with the 10th), I figured I had to take extra note of the occasion. (The thumbnail photo for this blog post is the Verdi memorial on Broadway near Lincoln Center; I snapped it on Wednesday during a brief visit to New York.) Given all of the reasons why I love Verdi, I could bore you with a list of my Top 10 greatest this-and-that, those moments when his genius invariably blows me away with the curve of a melodic line, the shift of a harmony, the perfect coloring of orchestration.  But I decided to try to boil everything down to one example, one that combines the power of Verdi's music with an example of what can happen when an extra-inspired interpreter grabs hold of it. The piece is the Overture to "La forza del destino" (you can hear the whole opera starting this weekend in a new, bicentennial-saluting production from Washington National Opera)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
"Falstaff," the last of Giuseppe Verdi's operas, is a marvel. From the first notes, the musical inventiveness never stops. And, thanks in large measure to the libretto Arrigo Boito fashioned from Shakespeare, the opera is a continual theatrical delight, with many a delicious character and comic situations that still deliver. To wrap up its season, Wolf Trap Opera offers an exhilarating production of this gem. If you haven't been yet -- and, especially, if you are one of those folks who has never warmed to "Falstaff" (the piece rarely sets box offices ablaze)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Lyric Opera Baltimore is wrapping up its comfort-food season with Verdi's stirring drama of love, nastiness and misplaced loyalties, “Rigoletto.” The staging looked a little square and economical Friday night at the Modell Performing Arts Center, but it often sounded splendid; Sunday's matinee ought to be even better. In the two short years since it emerged from the ruins of the longtime Baltimore Opera Company, which folded its tent in 2009, Lyric Opera Baltimore has taken a purposely conservative path, offering standard works in mostly traditional productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The opera world has been giving a little extra attention to a couple of giants born in 1813, Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. Locally, that bicentennial salute has included memorable concerts by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra featuring excerpts from Wagner's mountainous operas. And this week, Lyric Opera Baltimore offers a production of one of Verdi's earliest masterworks for the stage, "Rigoletto. " The "Rigoletto" staging brings tenor Bryan Hymel back to town after his Lyric debut last season, when he made a formidable impression in Gounod's "Faust.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 3, 1991
Censorship and complaints about it are constants -- although their intensity has varied throughout history and not necessarily in proportion to each other. Recently, we have come through a particularly intense period in regard to censorship -- or at least to complaints about it -- but one need only look to mid-19th century Italy to see a time when censorship genuinely affected art.This all comes to mind because the Baltimore Opera Company will present Guiseppe Verdi's "A Masked Ball" this week and next at the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 11, 2004
You've heard that those who can, do; and those who can't, teach. Well, sometimes, those who can, do - and teach, too. Victor Danchenko, for example. The Russian-born pedagogue, a veteran faculty member at two leading conservatories, Curtis and Peabody, gave an instructive recital Tuesday night at An die Musik LIVE. He demonstrated not just the calm authority you would expect from a professor and a competition-winning Moscow Conservatory graduate, but an unabashedly old-fashioned, romantic style.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
The 2013-2014 opera season at the Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric will have a lot in common with the 2012-2013 season -- staged works by Verdi and Puccini produced by Lyric Opera Baltimore, with a concert in between. There is something substantially more adventurous in terms of repertoire for next season, courtesy of the Peabody Opera Theatre, which will present Poulenc's "Dialogues of the Carmelites. " That masterpiece was last performed at the Lyric in 1984 by the old Baltimore Opera Company.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Annapolis Opera opened its 40th season with Giuseppe Verdi's 26th opera, "Aida," a performance that emphasized the music of this grand opera in an intimate setting that made a full staging impossible. Marking his 30th season as artistic director, Ronald J. Gretz chose to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Verdi's birth with the composer's monumental work in concert form. In contrast to the dazzling spectacle of a fully staged "Aida," we enjoyed the glorious music in the smaller Maryland Hall setting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.