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By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | November 18, 2007
On the tennis court, Venus and Serena Williams attack their opponents with an unmatchable zeal, but each sister brings to the game a style all her own. Off the court, the championship-dominating sisters share a similar zeal for fashion. And just like during tennis matches, the two express their flair for fashion in different ways. Venus Williams She will be signing autographs today at noon at Steve & Barry's in Eastpoint Mall.
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SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 11, 2009
NEW YORK -- For one set Thursday, Marin Cilic frolicked on the Arthur Ashe Stadium court. He hit crazy, curving backhands and had sixth-seeded Juan Martin del Potro muttering under his breath. But there was a second set. It was then that del Potro found his game on a gloomy afternoon where the wind played tricks with the ball. Del Potro did too, moving Cilic from side to side. By the end, Cilic was left slapping aimless volleys into the net and making useless challenges to balls well wide.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 3, 2008
Right out of the chute, I'm going to admit I'm at a bit of a disadvantage here, since I'm pretty sure Childs has Serena Williams in one of his fantasy tennis leagues. There's no arguing numbers and past performance with him - if you're curious, just look up the word insufferable in the dictionary - but the U.S. Open isn't played on paper. I'm not really sure what surface it's played on, but I'm almost certain it's not paper. I'm going with Venus because she's older and more experienced than her younger sibling, and the fact that she's named after a Roman goddess clearly is having a subliminal effect on me. The two of them are 8-8 in head-to-head competition, so it might come down to who gets to the courthouse first and legally changes her last name to Ocho Ocho.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 3, 2008
Right out of the chute, I'm going to admit I'm at a bit of a disadvantage here, since I'm pretty sure Childs has Serena Williams in one of his fantasy tennis leagues. There's no arguing numbers and past performance with him - if you're curious, just look up the word insufferable in the dictionary - but the U.S. Open isn't played on paper. I'm not really sure what surface it's played on, but I'm almost certain it's not paper. I'm going with Venus because she's older and more experienced than her younger sibling, and the fact that she's named after a Roman goddess clearly is having a subliminal effect on me. The two of them are 8-8 in head-to-head competition, so it might come down to who gets to the courthouse first and legally changes her last name to Ocho Ocho.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | October 8, 1993
The Ripken brothers will team up again, on the tennis court, at the First National Bank Tennis Festival on Oct. 22 at the Baltimore Arena.Cal and Bill Ripken will play doubles against Venus and Serena Williams in the opening match. The Williams sisters -- Venus, 13, and Serena, 12 -- train at the Nick Bolletieri Tennis Academy."Pam Shriver will be the chair umpire," said tournament director Robin Serody. "Bill and Cal are both natural athletes, but I'm not sure if they're ready for the force with which Venus and Serena pound a tennis ball."
SPORTS
By Christopher Clarey and Christopher Clarey,The New York Times | July 6, 2008
WIMBLEDON, England -- Sisters for life and doubles partners later in the afternoon, Venus and Serena Williams put all that aside for nearly two hours yesterday at Wimbledon, slugging serves and ground strokes in each other's direction with a vengeance. It had been five years since they had played a Grand Slam singles final together, and the long wait resulted in one of their most intense and entertaining matches despite the gusty conditions that made Centre Court feel more like a wind tunnel.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 13, 2000
Watching Richard Williams dance on a television booth and hold up a strange, handwritten sign to a baffled British crowd after his daughter, Venus, won Wimbledon last weekend, there was only one logical conclusion to make: That's one weird guy. But also a guy that, for all his eccentricities, deserves a ton of credit for sticking to his principles and being oh-so right in the end. At the moment, Williams' tennis-playing daughters, Venus and Serena, are...
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 11, 2009
NEW YORK -- For one set Thursday, Marin Cilic frolicked on the Arthur Ashe Stadium court. He hit crazy, curving backhands and had sixth-seeded Juan Martin del Potro muttering under his breath. But there was a second set. It was then that del Potro found his game on a gloomy afternoon where the wind played tricks with the ball. Del Potro did too, moving Cilic from side to side. By the end, Cilic was left slapping aimless volleys into the net and making useless challenges to balls well wide.
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Soft-spoken and demure, professional tennis player Chanda Rubin is not one to crave the spotlight. But she found herself at the forefront of the festivities that took place yesterday on the Druid Hill Park Lakeside Tennis Courts. Rubin, No. 18 in the world, was on hand for the fourth annual Head Kids Fun Day, organized by the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Head Urban All-Star Tennis Academy. From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., more than 200 kids ages 8 to 16 showed up on the 10 courts in West Baltimore to enjoy a day of tennis with one of the best players in the world.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
The woman sitting across the table amiably chatting about tennis, the Williams sisters and the future of the game is Zina Garrison, but she has only a vague resemblance to the Zina Garrison who retired from professional tennis last year.This woman looks different. She is glamorous and slim. Her hair is styled. Her eyes sparkle. Her smile is free and easy."A lot of people say I look different," said Garrison, laughing. "It's lack of stress."She sounds different, too.In 1990, as Garrison waited to step onto the green grass of Centre Court for the Wimbledon final, she said she hoped her achievement -- being the first African-American woman to reach a Grand Slam final since Althea Gibson in 1958 -- would inspire a generation of minority players.
SPORTS
By Christopher Clarey and Christopher Clarey,The New York Times | July 6, 2008
WIMBLEDON, England -- Sisters for life and doubles partners later in the afternoon, Venus and Serena Williams put all that aside for nearly two hours yesterday at Wimbledon, slugging serves and ground strokes in each other's direction with a vengeance. It had been five years since they had played a Grand Slam singles final together, and the long wait resulted in one of their most intense and entertaining matches despite the gusty conditions that made Centre Court feel more like a wind tunnel.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | November 18, 2007
On the tennis court, Venus and Serena Williams attack their opponents with an unmatchable zeal, but each sister brings to the game a style all her own. Off the court, the championship-dominating sisters share a similar zeal for fashion. And just like during tennis matches, the two express their flair for fashion in different ways. Venus Williams She will be signing autographs today at noon at Steve & Barry's in Eastpoint Mall.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - To quiet the skeptics, they'll have to play a great final. But to win Wimbledon's women's title today, Venus and Serena Williams may have to do something more difficult - grab something the other wants. For the first time in their careers, there may actually be a genuine rivalry brewing between the sisters raised together to be champs. Venus Williams is Wimbledon's two-time champion, but Serena Williams, in her first Wimbledon final, is desperate for the crown. Venus is No. 1 in this week's women's tour computer rankings.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
NEW YORK - Hollywood. That's what it was. Opening night for Two Sisters. A walk down the red carpet at the Oscars. Robert Redford was there. Mary Tyler Moore. Candice Bergen. Hilary Swank. Bruce Willis. Sean "P. Diddy" Combs. Even Frank Robinson was in the house. Diana Ross sang "God Bless America." Finally, Venus and Serena Williams walked onto Arthur Ashe Stadium to compete for the U.S. Open championship. In the second set last night, Venus and Serena combined for amazing points. With agility, power, skill and tenacity, they whaled on each other until Venus delivered the final blow, a backhand so strong that it ripped the racket from Serena's hand as she tried to return.
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Soft-spoken and demure, professional tennis player Chanda Rubin is not one to crave the spotlight. But she found herself at the forefront of the festivities that took place yesterday on the Druid Hill Park Lakeside Tennis Courts. Rubin, No. 18 in the world, was on hand for the fourth annual Head Kids Fun Day, organized by the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Head Urban All-Star Tennis Academy. From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., more than 200 kids ages 8 to 16 showed up on the 10 courts in West Baltimore to enjoy a day of tennis with one of the best players in the world.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 13, 2000
Watching Richard Williams dance on a television booth and hold up a strange, handwritten sign to a baffled British crowd after his daughter, Venus, won Wimbledon last weekend, there was only one logical conclusion to make: That's one weird guy. But also a guy that, for all his eccentricities, deserves a ton of credit for sticking to his principles and being oh-so right in the end. At the moment, Williams' tennis-playing daughters, Venus and Serena, are...
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
NEW YORK -- Venus and Serena, the Sisters Williams, are all grown up.Gone is the surliness. Gone is the defensiveness.Which of them is playing better at the U.S. Open, they are asked.Venus' head swivels to the left and Serena's to the right. They stare into each other's eyes.Heads straighten."We're both playing pretty good at times," said Venus."Our dad is playing the best," said Serena, laughing. "He's really serving well -- at practice."Richard Williams was serving pretty well earlier in this tournament, predicting on Day 1 that his daughters would meet in the Open final.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- When No. 1 Martina Hingis walked on court for her semifinal match, she already knew she'd have to beat the Williams sisters to win the U.S. Open.Yesterday, in an incredible match that required mental fortitude, physical stamina and pure heart, Hingis and No. 3 Venus Williams riveted 20,009 fans to their seats in Arthur Ashe Stadium as they waged woman-to-woman combat.Finally, after 2 hours and 1 minute, Hingis was the last one standing, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3.Now she will face the other half of the sister combo, No. 7 seed Serena Williams, in today's final.
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