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By Scott Dance | June 6, 2012
Did you watch the transit of Venus last night? Clouds threatened, but it sounds like they cleared in time for most to see the transit. Check out the photos above and to the left to see how others saw it. Or if you have your own to share, upload them here . Was it all you thought it would (or wouldn't) be? E-mail me at sdance@baltsun.com or tweet to @MdWeather with your reaction. Read more about the transit in my  story from Sunday's paper : When Venus passed between Earth and the sun 251 years ago Tuesday, scientists scribbled downobservations that helped calculate a rough estimate of the size of our solar system.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Judging by the spicy, sophisticated production of David Ives' “Venus in Fur," it's going to be an interesting year for the Columbia-based professional company Rep Stage, now in its first full season planned by recently appointed co-producing artistic directors Suzanne Beal and Joseph W. Ritsch. "Venus in Fur," a hit on Broadway in 2011, manages a neat little trick of turning tables and shifting centers of gravity as it confronts issues of desire, passion, sexuality and domination.
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NEWS
July 9, 2003
On July 3, 2003, VENUS, beloved mother of Charles Stanley, Venus Vaughn and Mitchel Davis. She is also survived by five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, two sisters, Louise White and Virginia Rogers and other relatives. Friends may call at the James A. Morton & Sons Funeral Homes, Inc., 1701 Laurens Street, Thursday 2 to 7 P.M. On Friday 10 A.M, Mrs. Cox will lie in state at People's Church of Baltimore, 230 N. Fulton Avenue. The family will receive friends 10:30 to 11 A. M followed by services.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
The two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter, will appear side by side in the early-morning sky Monday. At only a quarter of a degree apart, it's the closest two planets will appear in our sky this year, according to EarthSky.org. Look low in the eastern sky about 5 a.m., an hour before dawn, and see them into the morning twilight. Though they look close, they are hundreds of millions of miles apart.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
The two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter, will appear side by side in the early-morning sky Monday. At only a quarter of a degree apart, it's the closest two planets will appear in our sky this year, according to EarthSky.org. Look low in the eastern sky about 5 a.m., an hour before dawn, and see them into the morning twilight. Though they look close, they are hundreds of millions of miles apart.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 23, 2012
It has been hard not to notice Venus and Jupiter twinkling in the western sky on all the pleasant, clear nights we've had. The view is about to get a little more spectacular. The crescent moon begins to peek out tonight, and over the next several nights will provide some drama in the sky alongside the bright planets. Look just above the western horizon at dusk to find them. Venus is the higher planet, and Jupiter the lower. If you have a decent backyard telescope, you should even be able to see Jupiter's four largest moons orbiting the gaseous giant.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 30, 2012
A twice-in-a-lifetime celestial event is coming up in June, and on Tuesday, the Space Telescope Science Institute is providing a chance to learn more about it ahead of time. A monthly public lecture will focus on the transit of Venus, in which the planet will pass directly in front of the sun. During a transit, planets can be seen as a small black dot moving across the face of the sun. Of course, as with eclipses and other solar phenomena, they should not be viewed directly. In North America, the transit will be visible at sunset June 5. Look for more coverage here as the event gets closer.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 12, 2010
With a little luck, scientists and engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt will help to send a NASA spacecraft to land on an asteroid or on Venus late in this decade. The two proposed interplanetary missions with Goddard connections were among three selected Monday to receive $3.3 million each for further cost and feasibility study under NASA's New Frontiers program. Only one will be funded after a final cut later this year. The winning mission would have to launch by 2018, and cost less than $650 million.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Kristin Weisman loves a look that's "kind of bohemian, but at the same time, really feminine. I like girly things that have a little funk to them." Her style mirrors her professional life. The 30-year-old Parkville resident is an English teacher at Kenwood High School, a part-time burlesque performer with the Gilded Lily troupe, and a part-time yoga instructor. We "glimpsed" Weisman at another of her part-time gigs — as a hostess at Hampden's hip Rocket to Venus restaurant — in a navy rayon Sine romper and a wide segmented brown leather belt — both from Anthropologie.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | May 22, 2014
Intense, dark and brutally thought-provoking is how C Street's Venus Theatre's newest production, Light of Night, can be described. Although written four years ago, the gripping but yet sensitive and hopeful play by New York playwright Cecilia Copeland reflects events in the news today. In watching Light of Night, it had the feeling of an episode of the CBS hit series "Criminal Minds. " The play has all of the elements. There is a crime committed and the minds of the perpetrator and victim are delved into to the point of being a bit uncomfortable at times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gail Smith, Orlando Sentinel | March 2, 2014
Ukranian model Valeria Lukyanova, who has come to be known as the "human Barbie," now claims she doesn't consume food or water anymore, according to the dailymail.co.uk. That would be called starving yourself in some circles, but the model, 23, has said she is now converting to "breatharianism": training herself to live off only light and air. "In recent weeks I have not been hungry at all; I'm hoping it's the final stage before I can subsist on air and light alone," she has said.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | November 21, 2013
Venus Theatre's latest production, the premiere of "731 Degraw-street, Brooklyn or Emily Dickinson's Sister," starts with a dramatic ending and goes backward and forward in time, opening with gunshots and a young man's dead body sprawled on the stage. The opening left the theater tensely silent as the audience seemed to lean toward the stage in anticipation of where the story would go. They had to wait, a bit long at times, as the plot progressed while four actors changed into different costumes behind stage, and those playing ensemble roles changed the staging to music with a funky beat.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Venus and Saturn will be dancing together on the western horizon this week at dusk, getting so close they will be visible together in the same field of view when looking through binoculars, according to EarthSky.org. The planets are visible at nightfall but not much later than that, setting at early evening. Both appear as bright stars, with Venus the brighter of the two by a factor of about 80, according to EarthSky. They will be within 3 1/2 degrees of each other Wednesday and Thursday, according to Sky & Telescope.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Venus Theatre launches a new season with the world premiere of "Gift of Forgotten Tongues" by Fengar Gael, Thursday, Sept. 5 and Friday, Sept. 6 at 8 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 7 at 3 and 8 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 8 at 3 p.m., at 2 C St. In this play, Gael features lab generated mutagens, Claude and Celia, who were victims of terrible fate. They volunteer and are chosen for a study conducted by Dr. Weaver, a scientist studying and trying to recover lost language. Performances continue through September, Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 3 and 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m., except for Sunday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Michael G. Athas, who during a more than 30-year career in the entertainment business established some of the Baltimore area's most memorable and legendary nightclubs, died Monday from a glioblastoma at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was one day shy of this 87th birthday. "Mike was really the king of music in Baltimore. ... He was just sensational. He brought all the big bands to town," said George Moniodis, a longtime friend. The son of Greek immigrants George and Arhontoula Athanasakos, Michael George Athanasakos - who later changed the family's name to Athas - was born in York, Pa. "During the Great Depression, financial strain necessitated his father to send the family to Greece to live with grandparents while he pursued scarce job opportunities in the U.S.," said a son, George M. Athas of North Potomac.
NEWS
May 22, 2009
On May 19, 2009 VENUS W. HARRIS; wife of Bobby Harris. She is also survived by her loving daughter, Vina Welch; parents, Gloria and Van Welch; sisters, Linda Green and Carolyn Welch; niece, Kim Welch and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the family owned March Funeral Home, West, 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Friday after 1 p.m. Family will receive friends on Saturday at St. Mark's Institutional Church, 655 N. Bentalou at 9:30 a.m. followed by Funeral Service at 10.
NEWS
December 24, 1991
What a statement: "We probably have a better global map of Venus now than we have of Earth, because most of the ocean basins on Earth are so poorly mapped." That's from Dr. Stephen Saunders, chief scientist on the Magellan project, which is surveying Earth's nearest neighbor by radar.The first pictures from that radar imaging experiment, 14 months in the making, are stunning: Five-mile-high Maat Mons, only the second highest peak on the planet, surrounded by lava flows. Two-mile Gula Mons, small by Venusian standards, dominating a plain on which is stamped Crater Cunitz, named for astronomer Maria Cunitz.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 14, 2013
If you thought your family was dysfunctional, wait until you meet the Pecks in Venus Theatre's new production, "Grieving for Genevieve. " Set in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, the play revolves around three sisters and their mother, who come together for the middle sister's wedding. The bride-to-be, Delilah, is getting married for the third time. Played by Ty Hallmark, who studied at the Studio Theatre in Washington and the Globe Theatre in London, Delilah is not your girl next door.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
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