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By JACQUES KELLY | April 12, 2003
A NORTHEASTER was making the harbor miserable the other evening while I was warm and safe inside the nearby James Joyce Irish Pub. This was my initial trip to this newish saloon-restaurant, which as far I can tell, stands on the land that was once part of the old railroad yards attached to the President Street Station. It's a good idea to make myself visit these new and emerging parts of Baltimore, the chunk of the city that is changing so rapidly you have to spend some evenings there a couple of times a year, just to get your bearings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
In his 1935 essay "How to Drink Like a Gentleman," writer H.L. Mencken, Sage of Baltimore, compared drinking to sex: We could all use a few tips on how to do it correctly. Clearly, he had a lot of pent-up wisdom to impart, post-Prohibition era. Mencken spent much of that time lambasting the temperance movement in the pages of The Evening Sun, blaming teetotalers for ruining the perfect conviviality of a good drink. He once said a cocktail is "the greatest of all contributions of the American way of life [and]
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BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 3, 2001
Allegheny Ventures Inc. said yesterday that it has completed the purchase of an energy consulting firm and its partly owned subsidiary for $29.6 million. The acquisition of Fellon-McCord & Associates Inc. and Alliance Energy Services Partnership, both based in Louisville, Ky., will help Allegheny Energy Inc. expand its regional distribution business. It will also help diversify Allegheny Energy's businesses. Allegheny Ventures is an unregulated subsidiary of Hagerstown-based Allegheny Energy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2001
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., the Baltimore-based education services company, said yesterday that revenue rose nearly 60 percent, even as it lost money during the first quarter because of its venture capital subsidiary. For the quarter ended March 31, Sylvan had a net loss from continuing operations of $11.6 million, or 31 cents per share, compared to earnings of $3.4 million, or 7 cents per share, for the same quarter of last year. The loss came mostly from Sylvan Ventures, a subsidiary formed last year to invest in technology-based education companies.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
Two failed business ventures led Monarch Services Inc., the Baltimore-based publisher of Girls' Life magazine, to report losses for the fiscal year that were almost five times greater than those a year ago, according to the company's annual filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Charges from discontinued operations ballooned Monarch's losses by $641,000, to $795,000 for the fiscal year that ended April 30, compared with a $166,000 net loss in fiscal 2001. The net loss per share was 49 cents, compared with a 10-cent loss in the previous fiscal year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 23, 2007
When Jasiel Robinson was growing up in Atlanta, he learned much about running a business from his father, who owned a hair-care products company. Years later when Robinson became platinum-selling rapper Yung Joc, he applied the same progressive business acumen to his career in hip-hop. It's not just about making music. "You have a recognizable name and face and a credible reputation. You can relate all that to building financial wealth," says Joc, who plays 1st Mariner Arena tomorrow night as part of Screamfest '07, which also stars fellow Atlanta rapper T.I and R&B-pop princess Ciara.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
"Learning knows no boundaries," goes a new slogan of Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., but the Baltimore-based company has realized that investors' patience does. In a quarterly-earnings conference call with Wall Street analysts yesterday, Douglas L. Becker, the company's chairman and chief executive officer, said the company understands that substantial losses in a venture-investment subsidiary have pulled its stock to a seven-year low this month. Sylvan and other investors created a $400 million fund two years ago to invest in new education and technology companies, but the portfolio, which was supposed to be an engine of growth for the education-services company, has become a lead weight.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
It wasn't James Piper Bond's old-Baltimore name that lured Ravens coach Brian Billick onto the board of the Living Classrooms Foundation. It was a fateful combination of Bond's moxie, the arrest of Ray Lewis and one unusually large wooden chair. Billick and his wife, Kim, were looking for an organization to support, and many were looking to sign them up, too. But on a chance visit to the Living Classrooms' waterfront campus in Fells Point to speak to another group, Billick found Bond, the president, steering him through the carpentry shop where young men in trouble with the law - men whose lives resembled those of some of his players - carve a future in wood.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
Clarence Wooten is making a business of making businesses. His 1-year-old Wooten Ventures, a technology investment firm in Columbia, is offering itself as an angel investor and start-up partner with seed capital that will fill in management gaps, help the company find other investors, share office space and map out a detailed plan for getting acquired. It also is licensing technologies from European companies and building infrastructure that would allow the foreign firms to launch their products in the United States.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
NEW YORK CITY - Kevin Liles is riding high. On a bright August afternoon, the Baltimore-born entertainment mogul is ensconced 35 stories above midtown Manhattan, enjoying lunch at one of the city's most exclusive hotels, the Mandarin Oriental. The restaurant is a favorite spot for the music impresario, who is dining with his mother and two of his three children. "There's so much I want to do," says the 46-year-old entrepreneur and former Warner Music Group executive.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Frederick J. "Jack" Beste, a retired businessman and World War II veteran, died Wednesday at Lorien Mays Chapel of complications from pneumonia. He was 88. The son of Frederick J. Beste Sr., a cemetery director, and Evelyn Bevans Beste, a homemaker, Frederick John Beste was born in Baltimore and raised on Rosalie Avenue in Hamilton. He graduated in 1943 from Polytechnic Institute and enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he was a radar and mathematics instructor. After being discharged in 1947, he went to work as an instructor for the New York Technical Institute of Maryland and later became its director.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A University of Maryland, Baltimore official resigned Thursday amid inquiries into allegations that he defrauded an Oklahoma university of more than $1 million in a previous job and diverted the money to businesses from which he financially benefited. Daniel Webster Keogh joined UMB in April as a director in the New Ventures program, which focuses on technology and research initiatives. His hiring came about one year after Oklahoma State University filed a lawsuit against him, alleging that he and his company lost $1.675 million paid by the university-owned research company OSU-Multispectral Laboratories.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
A five-member team of students from Carroll County's Venturing Crew 202 won the 24th annual Maryland Envirothon - an outdoor natural resources competition that challenges students to identify and categorize living resources, perform soil surveys and solve other complex natural resource issues. More than 100 challengers from 18 counties across Maryland took part in this year's competition, held June 18-19 at the Camp Pecometh in Queen Anne's County. The five Carroll County students attend three different high schools in the region.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel agreed Wednesday to give H&S Bakery $200,000 to move its Harbor East distribution center as part of a deal officials say will help keep the business in the city. The Board of Estimates approved the agreement without discussion. Moving the distribution center also stands to financially benefit its owner, John Paterakis, who can use the prime real estate for another purpose. The Harbor East land is eligible for millions of dollars in tax breaks. Comptroller Joan M. Pratt cast the only dissenting vote on the five-member board.
TRAVEL
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Two Maryland casino operators are teaming up in hopes of opening a casino and resort in the Hudson Valley-Catskills area of New York, and are considering other projects in that state, the companies announced. The Cordish Cos., which runs Maryland Live in Hanover, the state's largest casino, and Penn National Gaming, which runs the second-largest, the Hollywood Casino in Perryville, hope to build the project in the Village of South Blooming Grove in Orange County, less than a 90-minute drive from Manhattan.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
Officials for Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. said yesterday that the company expects to increase its revenue this year by roughly 50 percent, but its investment arm will continue to drag down results. Douglas L. Becker, chairman and chief executive, told the company's annual meeting yesterday that the company projects 2001 revenue to be $475 million to $490 million in an estimated $2 trillion worldwide market in educational services. Projected earnings per diluted share will be 63 cents to 65 cents on net income of roughly $27 million, before subsidiary Sylvan Ventures' projected $50 million after-tax loss is factored in, said Sean Creamer, Sylvan Learning's interim chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. said yesterday that its $500 million Internet education incubator will be located in Baltimore, thanks to commitments from the city and state to improve parking and fiber-optic networks. The space for Sylvan Ventures will include four buildings near the company's headquarters at the corner of Fleet and Central streets. The entire venture will occupy 300,000 square feet, plus a 1,000-car parking garage. The state will provide $5 million in loans over five years.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, who stepped down in December, is joining a West Coast venture capital firm specializing in startups that diversify the tech industry and aim to have a positive social impact. Jealous, who will continue to reside in Silver Spring, will become a partner in the Kapor Center for Social Impact, joining entrepreneurs and center co-founders Mitchell Kapor and Freada Kapor Klein, the center said Tuesday. Kapor, which backs firms through its investment arm, Kapor Capital, works to close gaps in access, opportunity, wealth and participation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Peter DiPrinzio interviewed for jobs with big finance and consulting firms in his senior year of college in Vermont. Then he heard about a fledgling effort to send talented new graduates in a different direction - to jobs at startup companies in cities those grads might otherwise pass over. That program - like Teach For America but with an entrepreneurial twist - quickly hooked him. Now he's one of seven Venture for America "fellows" working in Baltimore, all of them about six months into two-year stints here.
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