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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2004
George L. Horn, a puppeteer and ventriloquist who spent more than 60 years delighting children and adults with the exploits of his hand-held characters, died Monday of a urinary infection at Millennium Health and Rehabilitation Center of Ellicott City. He was 98. "I saw him perform sometime around 1963 at Patterson Park, and to this day, I can still remember it," said Mark Walker, a Baltimore puppeteer and ventriloquist who spends his days as a planning analyst at Johns Hopkins Health Systems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 29, 2012
When "America's Got Talent" took a break for the Olympics at the end of July, the number of contestants had been cut down to manageable-to-remember 16. Now, two weeks after its return, with tangential rounds devoted to YouTube "talents"and wild card picks, the show is back up to an overwhelming 24. Now, over the next two weeks, "AGT" will cut the 24 down to six and the finals will well, finally begin. Host Nick Cannon referred to this week's episode as the "first semi-finals. " This is just reality TV stringing-along an audience and we've all unfortunately grown to accept it. First to the stage was Andrew De Leon, who sang "Ave Maria" as opera-like as he could.
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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 22, 2001
I SPENT the first day of spring in a magic shop on South Charles Street in Federal Hill, watching a 15-year-old ventriloquist and magician named Spencer Horsman and thinking: I would kill for this kid's future. A few nights earlier, Spencer had appeared on "Lance Burton's Young Magician's Showcase" on the Fox Family channel, performing a wild trick in which he stuffed his dummy Dexter into a music box and - presto! - Dexter emerged flatter than Wile E. Coyote after a steamroller runs over him. Now he was doing card tricks, pulling aces out of mid-air and doing complicated shuffles with the patter and poise of someone decades older.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | August 22, 2007
America's Got Talent, TV's highest-rated summer show, ended its second season last night with singer/ventriloquist Terry Fator taking home the $1 million prize. A Texas-based entertainer who said his dream was to headline in Las Vegas, Fator won over three other finalists: Bel Air country singer Julienne Irwin, beatboxer Antoinette "Butterscotch" Clinton and singer/guitarist Cas Haley. While 14-year-old Julienne was the first to be eliminated, the telecast was nevertheless a triumph for her. The live, two-hour program featured all the finalists performing duets with established artists in their field.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by an Annapolis ventriloquist who claimed he gave Pepsi "the right one." U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin ruled in a summary judgment last month that the ventriloquist, Arthur Takeall, did not present proof that Pepsico Inc. had known of his version of that phrase before using it to launch a successful advertising campaign in 1991.Mr. Takeall, who performs with his dummy, Scooter, claimed in a $130 million lawsuit against the soft drink giant last March that Pepsico swiped the line he has used in his act for years.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | July 31, 1994
Ventriloquist shines from the word 'go'So far, it's been a pretty good summer for 8-year-old Spencer Horsman. He became the best known ventriloquist in South Baltimore when magician David Copperfield invited him and "Dexter" on stage in Las Vegas recently to show off their talents.Just two weeks ago, he placed second in the 17-and-under division of the annual competition at the International Ventriloquists Convention.After Spencer discovered ventriloquism last March, he began to study the videotapes of Paul Winchell and Edgar Bergman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 29, 2012
When "America's Got Talent" took a break for the Olympics at the end of July, the number of contestants had been cut down to manageable-to-remember 16. Now, two weeks after its return, with tangential rounds devoted to YouTube "talents"and wild card picks, the show is back up to an overwhelming 24. Now, over the next two weeks, "AGT" will cut the 24 down to six and the finals will well, finally begin. Host Nick Cannon referred to this week's episode as the "first semi-finals. " This is just reality TV stringing-along an audience and we've all unfortunately grown to accept it. First to the stage was Andrew De Leon, who sang "Ave Maria" as opera-like as he could.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 24, 1990
A FRIEND of mine is going through a mid-life crisis and thinking about a career move from high school geometry teacher to ventriloquist.My feeling on the subject is this: We have far more lawyers in this country than we'll ever need. We also have too many newspaper columnists, pimps (that may be redundant) and car salesmen (ditto). Probably too many geometry teachers, too.But we have not yet reached the saturation point on ventriloquists, and the industry, while "soft" at the moment, could probably use an infusion of fresh talent.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | August 22, 2007
America's Got Talent, TV's highest-rated summer show, ended its second season last night with singer/ventriloquist Terry Fator taking home the $1 million prize. A Texas-based entertainer who said his dream was to headline in Las Vegas, Fator won over three other finalists: Bel Air country singer Julienne Irwin, beatboxer Antoinette "Butterscotch" Clinton and singer/guitarist Cas Haley. While 14-year-old Julienne was the first to be eliminated, the telecast was nevertheless a triumph for her. The live, two-hour program featured all the finalists performing duets with established artists in their field.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
Diet Pepsi, you've got the right one, baby. Right?No way, says an Annapolis ventriloquist who says he penned the phrase to the popular jingle soul singer Ray Charles has crooned over millions of television sets around the world the last two years.Arthur Takeall, 45, has filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Pepsico Inc. He alleges that the nation's No. 2 soft-drink maker used the words for a jingle he sent to the company in 1989 when he sought funding for an educational program with his dummy, Scooter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2004
George L. Horn, a puppeteer and ventriloquist who spent more than 60 years delighting children and adults with the exploits of his hand-held characters, died Monday of a urinary infection at Millennium Health and Rehabilitation Center of Ellicott City. He was 98. "I saw him perform sometime around 1963 at Patterson Park, and to this day, I can still remember it," said Mark Walker, a Baltimore puppeteer and ventriloquist who spends his days as a planning analyst at Johns Hopkins Health Systems.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 22, 2001
I SPENT the first day of spring in a magic shop on South Charles Street in Federal Hill, watching a 15-year-old ventriloquist and magician named Spencer Horsman and thinking: I would kill for this kid's future. A few nights earlier, Spencer had appeared on "Lance Burton's Young Magician's Showcase" on the Fox Family channel, performing a wild trick in which he stuffed his dummy Dexter into a music box and - presto! - Dexter emerged flatter than Wile E. Coyote after a steamroller runs over him. Now he was doing card tricks, pulling aces out of mid-air and doing complicated shuffles with the patter and poise of someone decades older.
NEWS
By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- "Ladies and gentleman," says master of ceremonies Jimmy Caesar, a tuxedo-clad holdover from a distant era, "this man needs no introduction."Out comes Jim Teter, tuxedo-clad himself and fresh from his latest cruise-ship appearance, where he delighted audiences with his "presidential dummies" Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton.What follows is something out of a vaudeville dream, at once endearing and awful. This is the 1998 Vegas Ventriloquist Convention, held the last weekend of July at the Imperial Palace Hotel & Casino on the Strip.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
If Dexter were a collie and not a dummy, the movie would be "Lassie Come Home."For just like Lassie, a long-lost Dexter did come home yesterday -- to a teary-eyed little boy who put his arm around him and then up his back.For nearly three weeks, Spencer Horsman, a 10-year-old ventriloquist, pined away for Dexter, his professional partner and prop, who had somehow been lost by the U.S. Postal Service. On June 6, Dexter had been boxed up and mailed from Venice, Calif., where he had been sent for refurbishing.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | July 31, 1994
Ventriloquist shines from the word 'go'So far, it's been a pretty good summer for 8-year-old Spencer Horsman. He became the best known ventriloquist in South Baltimore when magician David Copperfield invited him and "Dexter" on stage in Las Vegas recently to show off their talents.Just two weeks ago, he placed second in the 17-and-under division of the annual competition at the International Ventriloquists Convention.After Spencer discovered ventriloquism last March, he began to study the videotapes of Paul Winchell and Edgar Bergman.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by an Annapolis ventriloquist who claimed he gave Pepsi "the right one." U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin ruled in a summary judgment last month that the ventriloquist, Arthur Takeall, did not present proof that Pepsico Inc. had known of his version of that phrase before using it to launch a successful advertising campaign in 1991.Mr. Takeall, who performs with his dummy, Scooter, claimed in a $130 million lawsuit against the soft drink giant last March that Pepsico swiped the line he has used in his act for years.
NEWS
By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- "Ladies and gentleman," says master of ceremonies Jimmy Caesar, a tuxedo-clad holdover from a distant era, "this man needs no introduction."Out comes Jim Teter, tuxedo-clad himself and fresh from his latest cruise-ship appearance, where he delighted audiences with his "presidential dummies" Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton.What follows is something out of a vaudeville dream, at once endearing and awful. This is the 1998 Vegas Ventriloquist Convention, held the last weekend of July at the Imperial Palace Hotel & Casino on the Strip.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
If Dexter were a collie and not a dummy, the movie would be "Lassie Come Home."For just like Lassie, a long-lost Dexter did come home yesterday -- to a teary-eyed little boy who put his arm around him and then up his back.For nearly three weeks, Spencer Horsman, a 10-year-old ventriloquist, pined away for Dexter, his professional partner and prop, who had somehow been lost by the U.S. Postal Service. On June 6, Dexter had been boxed up and mailed from Venice, Calif., where he had been sent for refurbishing.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
Diet Pepsi, you've got the right one, baby. Right?No way, says an Annapolis ventriloquist who says he penned the phrase to the popular jingle soul singer Ray Charles has crooned over millions of television sets around the world the last two years.Arthur Takeall, 45, has filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Pepsico Inc. He alleges that the nation's No. 2 soft-drink maker used the words for a jingle he sent to the company in 1989 when he sought funding for an educational program with his dummy, Scooter.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 24, 1990
A FRIEND of mine is going through a mid-life crisis and thinking about a career move from high school geometry teacher to ventriloquist.My feeling on the subject is this: We have far more lawyers in this country than we'll ever need. We also have too many newspaper columnists, pimps (that may be redundant) and car salesmen (ditto). Probably too many geometry teachers, too.But we have not yet reached the saturation point on ventriloquists, and the industry, while "soft" at the moment, could probably use an infusion of fresh talent.
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