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Ventilation

BUSINESS
July 27, 1992
Sick buildingsGrowing numbers of Americans are discovering that their fatigue, irritated throats or runny noses may be caused or aggravated by working in office buildings with inadequate ventilation systems.The rise of "sick building syndrome" began in the 1970s, when there was a national push to make buildings more energy-efficient. But sealing them tightly caused air quality problems.The Environmental Protection Agency defines sick building syndrome as a situation when occupants experience acute health problems and discomfort that appear to be linked to time spent in a building.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 1992
I. M. I. Inc. in Bethesda won a $789,799 contract from the Navy to upgrade the ventilation systems in buildings 560 through 566.A-Z Restoration Inc. in Glendale won a $198,000 contract from the Navy to replace a roof in building 256 at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington.Twigg Corp. in Capitol Heights won a $132,000 contract from the Navy to upgrade the ventilation system for a Navy building.Non-defense contractsVWR Scientific in Columbia won a $3,503,675 contract from the VA Marketing Center to provide pharmaceuticals.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1997
Parent volunteers at Jeffers Hill Elementary School in east Columbia said last night they plan to survey students, parents and staff to determine the extent and types of chronic health problems that some parents have linked to poor ventilation and possible poor air quality in the building.Parents also said they will review maintenance records of the ventilation system at the school.The announcements came at the first meeting of a Jeffers Hill PTA committee formed to monitor air quality issues and the progress of renovations planned there.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 10, 2000
Health inspectors found no traces of the bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease at Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, the city's health commissioner said yesterday. Dr. Peter L. Beilenson said that inspectors took samples throughout the building after the disease was diagnosed in a court employee two weeks ago, and that all test results were negative. "It should help to reassure staff members," Beilenson said. He said he was surprised that the courthouse tests were clean. Most institutions have traces of the bacteria somewhere, he said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Ever since the air quality crisis struck Deer Park Elementary School last month, rumors have circulated among parents and residents about the history of the site. One theory holds that the school was built on a dump; another a swamp.Baltimore County officials said yesterday they've hired air quality specialists to get to the bottom of those suspicions.Over the next couple of weeks, ATEC Associates Inc. will track the history of the land, probing whether there are storage tanks, buried waste or any other items that could contaminate the air or water.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992
This is a weekly summary of selected prime contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in Maryland.National defense contractsI. M. I. Inc. in Bethesda won a $789,799 contract from the Navy to upgrade the ventilation systems in buildings 560 through 566.A-Z Restoration Inc. in Glendale won a $198,000 contract from the Navy to replace a roof in building 256 at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington.Twigg Corp. in Capitol Heights won a $132,000 contract from the Navy to upgrade the ventilation system for a Navy building.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
The Investment Building in Towson was reopened yesterday after final tests showed no significant levels of airborne asbestos fibers. The 700 county and state workers assigned to the building were asked to return to work today, although some said they had grave concerns because of the building's troubled history. "I want written assurance regarding the safety of the building from the state and county, given the absence of concern regarding the health and welfare of their employees," said Deborah Veystrk, a supervisor with the county's Department of Social Services.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
John Paul Ambrose Jr., a heating, ventilation and air-conditioning contractor who was a professional football player for the Baltimore Colts in 1954, died of cancer Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 74. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he boxed in Golden Gloves competitions and served as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division from 1945 to 1947. He earned a bachelor's degree in the early 1950s at the Newark College of Engineering in New Jersey and attended Arizona State University, where he played football as a running back.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 26, 1991
So your shelves are lined with products that say DANGER! CAUTION! WARNING! and other little hints like that, but you paid for them, by gum, and you are going to use them.Or maybe you bought that one can of incredibly toxic paint stripper because you can't find anything else to do the job. Or you have to have this tube of killer glue because it's just too embarrassing to go around with bent paper clips in your eyeglasses.Fine. For you Must Haves, here are some tips about how to use toxic household products with minimum impact on your health and on the health of those around you.* Buy the smallest amount needed for the job. You don't want any extra lying around the house, and you may be legally required to dispose of leftovers as household hazardous waste.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
Since Aberdeen Proving Ground cleared a stockpile of deadly mustard agent last year, the distant booms of guns and occasional flashes of light have been the only reminders of the weapons testing taking place beyond the gates of the sprawling military base. But in two separate yet strikingly similar incidents this week, the reality of APG's dangerous mission resurfaced when power failures in a pair of chemical testing laboratories prompted concerns that employees could have been exposed to deadly substances when ventilation fans failed.
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