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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
Two weeks into the school year, the cafeteria at the new Linton Springs Elementary School in Eldersburg is still not ready for use because ventilation equipment has failed to meet Health Department standards."
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Police Department plans to renovate its indoor shooting range in Lutherville after being cited for exposing employees to high concentrations of lead. Maryland Occupational Safety and Health issued the citations in May after finding that the ventilation system operated poorly and other protections against lead exposure, such as regular disposal of combustible waste, were not in place. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said the department is evaluating plans to improve ventilation.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Workers at Westport Elementary School, where two people died and two others were burned Sunday in a flash fire, failed to open windows to provide adequate ventilation for the solvent they were using to refinish a gymnasium floor, Baltimore Fire Department investigators have found.Lt. Thurman O. Pugh, a Fire Department spokesman, said yesterday that the workers also failed to follow instructions on the solvent can that advised using the liquid on no more than 4 square feet of floor at a time to avoid excessive fumes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Students and staff were evacuated from Westside Elementary School in Baltimore's Penn North neighborhood early Friday morning after carbon monoxide levels rose to a level higher than is considered safe in the school's boiler room, a Baltimore City Public Schools spokeswoman said. Everyone exited the building in the 2200 block of N. Fulton Ave., south of Druid Hill Park in West Baltimore, sometime after the morning bell rang so work crews could assess where the gas was coming from, said Edie House Foster, the spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
Two weeks into the school year, the cafeteria at the new Linton Springs Elementary School in Eldersburg is still not ready for use because ventilation equipment has failed to meet Health Department standards."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
Hoping to focus attention on their work conditions, 50 state and Baltimore County employees gathered for a quiet noontime rally yesterday outside a Towson office building that they say has poor ventilation, mold and other contaminants. "All we want is the building cleaned up," said Jane Koel, a county social worker who thinks the Investment Building has caused her breathing problems and infections, and is the source of the Legionella pneumophila bacteria present in her system. "You walk in there and you can smell the stagnation in the air. There is no circulation."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
For years, the 13,000 workers at the Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn have had to deal with quirky heating and air conditioning, poor ventilation, desks built when computers took up entire rooms -- and all the other limitations of a building that had received no major renovations since Dwight D. Eisenhower was president. But that's about to change. A $96.9 million renovation plan for the main building on the Social Security campus, the first comprehensive overhaul since it was constructed in 1959, was announced yesterday by federal officials.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
In July, two months before three families were evacuated from their homes in the Calvert Ridge subdivision in Elkridge because of high levels of methane gas, two families in a Laurel subdivision who own houses also built by Ryan Homes were forced out for the same reason.The evacuated occupants in Laurel's Wyndham Woods and those in Calvert Ridge and nearby Marshalee Estates subdivision -- where a family was evacuated last month -- want answers from Ryan officials about the source of the methane, which has heightened safety concerns and contributed to lower property values, they say. The Laurel families moved out July 25 and were back home a week later.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
One classroom was so cold in winter that kindergartners wore parkas and mittens to class, and when that wasn't enough, their teacher had them run laps around the gym to warm up. In hot weather, broken air conditioners left rooms so steamy that children fell asleep at their desks.Still, at troubled Deer Park Elementary School, teachers were told by facilities officials that there was nothing wrong with their new "state-of-the-art" ventilation system and were told at one point that the problem was their hormones, teachers say."
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 26, 1991
So your shelves are lined with products that say DANGER! CAUTION! WARNING! and other little hints like that, but you paid for them, by gum, and you are going to use them.Or maybe you bought that one can of incredibly toxic paint stripper because you can't find anything else to do the job. Or you have to have this tube of killer glue because it's just too embarrassing to go around with bent paper clips in your eyeglasses.Fine. For you Must Haves, here are some tips about how to use toxic household products with minimum impact on your health and on the health of those around you.* Buy the smallest amount needed for the job. You don't want any extra lying around the house, and you may be legally required to dispose of leftovers as household hazardous waste.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A lieutenant with the Baltimore Fire Department who was badly burned during an early-morning fire in East Baltimore on Oct. 11 has recovered enough to be taken off of a ventilator but still has a long way to go in his recovery, according to a union official. "He was able to talk to me. We were able to have a conversation," Michael Campbell, president of the fire officers union, said of his recent visit with the officer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. "He was still somewhat sedated.
NEWS
January 19, 2011
For three decades, Ridgely Middle School's PTA has held an annual craft fair to raise money for the school. The $13,000 in proceeds from last fall's event will be used for such things as school supplies, student assemblies and phone directories distributed in September. Every penny raised by the PTA, organizers say proudly, goes back into the school. But this may be the last school year Baltimore County allows the event. The reason? The PTA leases space in the Timonium school to third-party, for-profit vendors (generally part-time purveyors of jewelry, silk floral arrangements, hand-knit sweaters and the like)
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Locked up at home nice and tight on a chilly January night. Take a deep breath. But what exactly are you breathing? Studies show indoor air can be more polluted than outdoor air, as much as five times more. And even a "leaky" house - one not so tightly sealed against escaping heat and incoming drafts - can have contaminants in the air. Indoor air quality can be compromised by deteriorated insulation, molds growing in a wet basement, chimney backdrafts, improper ventilation, and air leaks in ductwork or other household systems.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | June 2, 2008
George Washington Dexter, the founder of a 59-year-old Baltimore heating and ventilation firm and an avid sailor died of chronic lung disease Wednesday at his Roland Park home. He was 89. Mr. Dexter ran the Mount Washington-based Dexter Co. with his wife, and the couple raised four daughters to become successful businesswomen in technical fields. "He was remarkably ahead of his time in his understanding of what women were capable of," said his daughter Susan D. Cesare of North Baltimore, president of the HVAC reseller and consulting firm.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | September 23, 2007
My attic has natural ventilation. It has triangular vents at the top side walls of my home. How do I know whether I have enough attic ventilation? My attic gets so hot in the summer, you can barely breathe up there. It is impossible to stay up there more than a few minutes. How much soffit ventilation should I have? What is the best way to cool my attic naturally without any electric-powered fans? I applaud you for trying to ventilate your attic the old-fashioned way. But without moving large amounts of air in a short amount of time through your attic space, I doubt you will ever get its temperature cool enough to make it tolerable to spend much time there.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
The Naval Academy will celebrate John Paul Jones' birthday tomorrow beginning at 9 a.m. with a march to the crypt of the legendary naval hero for a wreath-laying ceremony. A Revolutionary War re-enactor will give a lecture on Jones' life and his contribution to the war, followed by a flag raising ceremony at the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center near Gate 1 at King George and Randall streets. The festivities will include music from The Fifes and Drums of Prince William III, a Virginia-based musical group, and cannon-loading demonstrations.
NEWS
May 1, 2002
North Carroll High School students were dismissed early yesterday after a ventilation fan malfunctioned, leaving a foul odor in many of the school's classrooms, school officials said. Students were evacuated about 10:40 a.m. after several teachers called the office to report an unusual smell. Students remained outside - and were moved to the school's stadium - before being bused home about 1 p.m. The problem was fixed by early afternoon and the school will open on time this morning.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1992
Sick buildingsGrowing numbers of Americans are discovering that their fatigue, irritated throats or runny noses may be caused or aggravated by working in office buildings with inadequate ventilation systems.The rise of "sick building syndrome" began in the 1970s, when there was a national push to make buildings more energy-efficient. But sealing them tightly caused air quality problems.The Environmental Protection Agency defines sick building syndrome as a situation when occupants experience acute health problems and discomfort that appear to be linked to time spent in a building.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
Since Aberdeen Proving Ground cleared a stockpile of deadly mustard agent last year, the distant booms of guns and occasional flashes of light have been the only reminders of the weapons testing taking place beyond the gates of the sprawling military base. But in two separate yet strikingly similar incidents this week, the reality of APG's dangerous mission resurfaced when power failures in a pair of chemical testing laboratories prompted concerns that employees could have been exposed to deadly substances when ventilation fans failed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
No one knows whether an avian flu virus that is racing around the world might mutate into a strain that could cause a human pandemic, or whether such a pandemic would cause widespread illness in the United States. But if it did, public health experts and officials agree on one thing: The nation's hospitals would not have enough ventilators, the machines that pump oxygen into sick patients' lungs. Right now, there are 105,000 ventilators, and even during a regular flu season, about 100,000 are in use. In a worst-case human pandemic, according to the national preparedness plan issued by President Bush in November, the country would need as many as 742,500.
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