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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
It's a poisonous white-lined tree viper in Elkridge that has state and county officials so jumpy -- that and the worry that there might be dozens of collectors of exotic and illegal snakes in Howard County.Maryland Natural Resources Police are investigating an incident last week in which an 18-year-old Elkridge woman was bitten in the face by the viper at a Deep Run Trailer Park home.As of Friday, police had not verified the snake's owner and were planning to visit the mobile home in the 6600 block of Aspern Drive, said Barbara MacLeod, a police spokeswoman.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 11, 2003
A poisonous pet snake that bit its owner's girlfriend while loose in the owner's Annapolis apartment last week has been identified as a water moccasin, a spokesman from the Department of Natural Resources said yesterday. The highly venomous water moccasin, or cottonmouth, is found in swampy areas of the Southern United States. It is not indigenous to Maryland. It is more dangerous than the two species of venomous snakes - the copperhead and the timber rattlesnake - that are native to Maryland.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
The National Aquarium in Baltimore will feature a new exhibit next month -- poisonous snakes from the rain forests of Costa Rica."We think that it's important we show people that venomous snakes can be beautiful," Jack Cover, the aquarium's curator for rain forest exhibits, said yesterday. "They deserve respect. They're part of the ecosystem and they have their place in it."Mr. Cover said the vipers will be the first in the aquarium's animal collection.The snakes -- an eyelash viper and a hognose viper -- will be on display in glass cases in the aquarium's Hidden Life exhibit.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
The pinch that Jacqueline L. Lee felt when she reached for the coffee table at her boyfriend's Annapolis house Wednesday turned out to be an 18-inch, black, venomous snake sinking its fangs into her left thumb. The bite left 21-year-old Lee in serious condition at Anne Arundel Medical Center and her boyfriend, Devin D. Conley, 29, apologizing to his injured girlfriend. "He's been trying to take care of me the whole time," Lee said from her hospital room last night. After the hospital gave her anti-venom, the Annapolis woman's condition improved, but Lee said her left arm is still "mutated-looking and completely swollen."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 11, 2003
A poisonous pet snake that bit its owner's girlfriend while loose in the owner's Annapolis apartment last week has been identified as a water moccasin, a spokesman from the Department of Natural Resources said yesterday. The highly venomous water moccasin, or cottonmouth, is found in swampy areas of the Southern United States. It is not indigenous to Maryland. It is more dangerous than the two species of venomous snakes - the copperhead and the timber rattlesnake - that are native to Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
EMMITSBURG -- To Brian Leslie West, a snake was a beautiful creature that didn't deserve its sinister reputation, a belief he maintained even while he was dying from a cobra's bite.Bitten by a king Indian cobra early yesterday and infected with venom he knew would kill him, Mr. West told a friend, "It bit me on the foot . . . We've got to catch the animal and put it in its cage before the paramedics get here, so no one else gets hurt."Five minutes later, the 25-year-old expert and collector of more than 50 snakes went into cardiac arrest and never awoke.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
The pinch that Jacqueline L. Lee felt when she reached for the coffee table at her boyfriend's Annapolis house Wednesday turned out to be an 18-inch, black, venomous snake sinking its fangs into her left thumb. The bite left 21-year-old Lee in serious condition at Anne Arundel Medical Center and her boyfriend, Devin D. Conley, 29, apologizing to his injured girlfriend. "He's been trying to take care of me the whole time," Lee said from her hospital room last night. After the hospital gave her anti-venom, the Annapolis woman's condition improved, but Lee said her left arm is still "mutated-looking and completely swollen."
NEWS
June 14, 2000
What's for dinner? Rattlesnakes eat small mammals and birds. Snakes The rattlesnake uses its eyes, a forked tongue, and pit organs (special organs that can sense temperature changes) to find food...even in the dark! Once prey is discovered, the rattlesnake will strike with large fangs like needles, injecting venom into its prey to kill it. (The snake even has a spare set of fangs in case the first set breaks!) The snake's rattle, used to warn predators, is made of hard sections of old skin.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 27, 2010
A woman was treated Sunday for a cobra bite she said she suffered in a White Marsh shopping center parking lot, a Baltimore County fire spokeswoman said. The Fire Department received a call at 7:12 p.m. from the Patient First clinic in the 4900 block of Campbell Boulevard in White Marsh that a woman had walked in reporting a cobra had bitten her on the finger — and she brought the live snake with her, said fire spokeswoman Elise Armacost. "Staff had placed the snake in a trash can and wanted to know what to do with it," Armacost said.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Baltimore native and Towson University graduate Mike Rowe informed fans on Thanksgiving Eve that the Discovery Channel show he hosted, "Dirty Jobs," was no more. Rowe, the show's creator and executive producer, wrote on his blog that it was canceled: "A few weeks ago, I was officially informed that Dirty Jobs had entered into a new phase," Rowe wrote on his blog. "One I like to call, 'permanent hiatus.' Or in the more popular industry vernacular, canceled. " "Dirty Jobs" was a reality show in which Rowe and his crew traveled across the country to document some of the most unsavory jobs.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
It's a poisonous white-lined tree viper in Elkridge that has state and county officials so jumpy -- that and the worry that there might be dozens of collectors of exotic and illegal snakes in Howard County.Maryland Natural Resources Police are investigating an incident last week in which an 18-year-old Elkridge woman was bitten in the face by the viper at a Deep Run Trailer Park home.As of Friday, police had not verified the snake's owner and were planning to visit the mobile home in the 6600 block of Aspern Drive, said Barbara MacLeod, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
The National Aquarium in Baltimore will feature a new exhibit next month -- poisonous snakes from the rain forests of Costa Rica."We think that it's important we show people that venomous snakes can be beautiful," Jack Cover, the aquarium's curator for rain forest exhibits, said yesterday. "They deserve respect. They're part of the ecosystem and they have their place in it."Mr. Cover said the vipers will be the first in the aquarium's animal collection.The snakes -- an eyelash viper and a hognose viper -- will be on display in glass cases in the aquarium's Hidden Life exhibit.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
EMMITSBURG -- To Brian Leslie West, a snake was a beautiful creature that didn't deserve its sinister reputation, a belief he maintained even while he was dying from a cobra's bite.Bitten by a king Indian cobra early yesterday and infected with venom he knew would kill him, Mr. West told a friend, "It bit me on the foot . . . We've got to catch the animal and put it in its cage before the paramedics get here, so no one else gets hurt."Five minutes later, the 25-year-old expert and collector of more than 50 snakes went into cardiac arrest and never awoke.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
If you live in Baltimore and your preference in pets runs to mongooses, bears and kangaroos, then you'll be sorely disappointed with the city Health Department's new regulations as to which exotic pets you can keep in your home or backyard. But for those who like the distinction between being in a city and being on a farm or in the wild, the regulations are fair, balanced and welcome. The roster of animals that are nurtured as pets has long expanded from dogs, cats, goldfish, parakeets and hamsters to include llamas, monkeys, snakes and all manner of furry, feathered, winged and slithery friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Teara D. Quamina and Teara D. Quamina,Contributing Writer | March 12, 1998
As visitors enter through the huge double doors, they are greeted by a doorman who directs them into the intimate showroom. Twenty-four exhibits are encased in marble that extends from the floor to the high, arched ceilings and are protected by polished brass railings.Does this sound like a museum?Well, it is a living museum at the Reptile House in Druid Hill Park.It houses more than 500 amphibians and reptiles, including venomous snakes and poisonous frogs.For those preferring to wait out the initial excitement at the opening of the National Aquarium in Baltimore's "Venom: Striking Beauties" exhibit, the Reptile House offers an introduction to venomous reptiles.
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