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NEWS
By Stan Lichtenstein | September 21, 1990
ENDOWED with prodigious fangs, Pat Buchanan speaks with authority when he detects "venom" and "excess" in Abe Rosenthal's column accusing him of anti-Semitism. Buchanan should know. He's an expert on venom."Pat, I want you to cut this bastard from rectum to belly button," his publisher at the St. Louis Globe-Democrat told him one morning in the 1960s, referring to "some liberal who had misstepped." Pat replied venomously: "I'm already working on him, sir."Buchanan also boasts in his autobiography of accomplishments inspired by the "wise counsel Westbrook Pegler had once given a young journalist" concerning the "proper posture" to be taken in attacking political opponents: "Stand flat on your feet and swing for the belly."
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NEWS
November 19, 2012
The sour Skittles are coming out of the woodwork, and I'm finding them increasingly harder to swallow. I am both surprised and amused to learn that all 50 states have turned in pleas (or petitions) to secede from the United States ("Petitions call for secession and dance session," Nov. 15). I'm curious where all this venom and extremism was before the election. Do they realize that if their states were to successfully secede, they forfeit their rights to claim baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet as their mantra?
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NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 1, 2005
Sorting through boxes of fossils collected 14 years ago, a Canadian doctoral student discovered the deadly, poisonous bite of a 60 million-year-old mammal the size of a mouse. The first "venom delivery apparatus" ever found in an extinct mammal was described last week in the research journal Nature by the student, Craig Scott, and his professor, vertebrate paleontologist Richard C. Fox of the University of Alberta, Edmonton. Its discovery may shed new light on the reason why mammals, unlike reptiles, seldom evolved to use poisonous bites for predation and protection.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 31, 2010
In June of 1963, after a tumultuous spring of demonstrations in Birmingham, Ala., John F. Kennedy said an odd thing. In a meeting at the White House, the president told civil rights leaders they ought not be too hard on Bull Connor. Connor, he said with a grin, "Has done as much for civil rights as Abraham Lincoln. " Theophilus Eugene Connor, of course, was commissioner of public safety in Birmingham. When you see archival footage of children being menaced by police dogs or bowled over by water from fire hoses, you are seeing his handiwork.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 17, 2005
Venom isn't worth a critic's venom, but a brief condemnation is in order. Sept. 11 caused movie companies to delay the opening of any pictures depicting terrorism or collapsed buildings or sloppy airport security. Yet in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, here's a slipshod horror movie set in a small Louisiana town facetiously called "Backwater" that condescends atrociously to Gulf culture. The native gumbo now being celebrated - or mourned - is treated as the source of a voodoo practice gone wrong that imbues the corpse of a Backwater hard guy with 13 hideous souls.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
In the deserts of the Middle East, the giant yellow Israeli scorpion is a ruthless hunter whose bite can bring on fever, convulsions, coma and, sometimes, heart failure in humans unlucky enough to run afoul of it. But the same venom that has earned this 4-inch-long arthropod the name "deathstalker" may be the key to longer life for humans under attack from an even more insidious predator. In a study published in last month's issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, researchers made a version of the venom and used it in a new treatment for a deadly brain cancer called glioma.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
Women might use perfume to impress each other or to attract men. But scientists say that it could attract something else: angry hornets. Japanese researchers extracted venom from the world's largest species of hornet and found that the venom contains at least one ingredient, also used in perfumes, that prompts other hornets to attack at the slightest whiff. Representatives of the fragrance industry said the study is flawed and the results misleading. "It's a nice story, but these guys are wrong," said Glenn Roberts, a spokesman for the Washington-based Fragrance Materials Association.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
On a blazing Tuesday afternoon in late June, painter Charles Lennox was working on a house nestled in the woods above Frederick when his putty knife tumbled into a shrub. As he reached in to retrieve it, he felt something crunch down hard onto his hand. He jerked his arm away and a jolt of fear shot through him when he saw what was attached: Crotalus horridus horridus, the highly toxic timber rattlesnake, dangling by a single fang from the flesh of his forefinger. "Oh, my lord," he thought.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Suffering from colorectal cancer, Tom McAuliffe was in such pain that he had to sleep standing up, propped against a couch. Now he can rest easier, thanks to a new pain medicine derived from an unlikely source: the venom of a snail from a coral reef off the Philippines. When the drug received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration in December, it was believed to be the first time the agency has approved a medicine that is an exact copy of a chemical found in the ocean.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 6, 1993
They're back -- honeybees, yellow jackets, hornets and wasps. For most of us, insect bites are a minor nuisance, but for a small percentage, those who suffer from what is usually called "an allergic reaction" to insect venom, insects can be a source of worry and anxiety.The good news is that fewer than 50 deaths from insect stings are recorded in the United States each year. The worrisome news is that the number of people likely to have a severe reaction to insect stings is estimated to be in the tens of millions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 5, 2008
Dr. Barry S. Gold, a Baltimore internist and herpetologist who was an international expert on the management and treatment of venomous snakebites, died Monday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Pikesville resident was 61. Barry Steven Gold was born in Baltimore and raised on Menlo Drive in Northwest Baltimore. He was a 1965 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of Maryland in 1969. After earning a medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1973, he completed an internship and residency at Maryland General Hospital.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
In the deserts of the Middle East, the giant yellow Israeli scorpion is a ruthless hunter whose bite can bring on fever, convulsions, coma and, sometimes, heart failure in humans unlucky enough to run afoul of it. But the same venom that has earned this 4-inch-long arthropod the name "deathstalker" may be the key to longer life for humans under attack from an even more insidious predator. In a study published in last month's issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, researchers made a version of the venom and used it in a new treatment for a deadly brain cancer called glioma.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 30, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The search for cancer cures can at times produce some curious treatments, but the latest study just might stun you. Neurosurgeons at St. Louis University are among the doctors injecting radioactive scorpion toxin directly into the brains of patients with a deadly brain cancer. "It's not like people said, `Scorpion venom - this must be a good way to treat cancer,'" said Dr. Alison M. O'Neill, vice president for medical affairs for TransMolecular Inc. The company, based in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
They sign their letters "Very truly yours," but there's nothing dear about the correspondence between Jervis S. Finney and Ward B. Coe III. "With respect to your January 10th letter, I disagree with a number of your characterizations of events but, at least, they are consistent with your self-professed position as advocate for the Governor," Coe, counsel to the special committee investigating Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s personnel practices, writes in...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 17, 2005
Venom isn't worth a critic's venom, but a brief condemnation is in order. Sept. 11 caused movie companies to delay the opening of any pictures depicting terrorism or collapsed buildings or sloppy airport security. Yet in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, here's a slipshod horror movie set in a small Louisiana town facetiously called "Backwater" that condescends atrociously to Gulf culture. The native gumbo now being celebrated - or mourned - is treated as the source of a voodoo practice gone wrong that imbues the corpse of a Backwater hard guy with 13 hideous souls.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Suffering from colorectal cancer, Tom McAuliffe was in such pain that he had to sleep standing up, propped against a couch. Now he can rest easier, thanks to a new pain medicine derived from an unlikely source: the venom of a snail from a coral reef off the Philippines. When the drug received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration in December, it was believed to be the first time the agency has approved a medicine that is an exact copy of a chemical found in the ocean.
NEWS
By Sean Adkins and Sean Adkins,YORK DAILY RECORD | November 3, 2002
YORK, Pa. - When Clay Benton is not working to catch criminals, the Baltimore County police officer is climbing trees and digging holes to capture York County yellow jackets and hornets. But the part-time insect collector for Spring Mills-based Vespa Laboratories has found the drought that has plagued York County has cut the number of available bugs. Yellow jackets and hornets are carnivorous. The insects that make up their main food source feed on crops and plants, whose growth might have been hampered by lack of water, said Miles Guralnick, president of Vespa Laboratories.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
Ever wake up feeling like the Tin Man after a damp night sleeping outdoors?Your knuckles ache, your elbows, your knees, every other place where bone is joined to bone squeaks with pain?If so, you might want to think about honeybee venom. Some people believe it relieves the pain of arthritis. The evidence for this is anecdotal. That means it's never been proved that the chemicals and enzymes and whatnot that make up honeybee venom can actually ease the agony of arthritis, or anything else.
NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 1, 2005
Sorting through boxes of fossils collected 14 years ago, a Canadian doctoral student discovered the deadly, poisonous bite of a 60 million-year-old mammal the size of a mouse. The first "venom delivery apparatus" ever found in an extinct mammal was described last week in the research journal Nature by the student, Craig Scott, and his professor, vertebrate paleontologist Richard C. Fox of the University of Alberta, Edmonton. Its discovery may shed new light on the reason why mammals, unlike reptiles, seldom evolved to use poisonous bites for predation and protection.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
Women might use perfume to impress each other or to attract men. But scientists say that it could attract something else: angry hornets. Japanese researchers extracted venom from the world's largest species of hornet and found that the venom contains at least one ingredient, also used in perfumes, that prompts other hornets to attack at the slightest whiff. Representatives of the fragrance industry said the study is flawed and the results misleading. "It's a nice story, but these guys are wrong," said Glenn Roberts, a spokesman for the Washington-based Fragrance Materials Association.
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