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NEWS
February 24, 2013
Regarding your report on the guilty plea of alleged school shooter Robert Gladden Jr., I am a firm believer that before judges and prosecutors send a defendant to jail, they should spend some time incarcerated themselves to experience the conditions a prisoner faces ("Gladden pleads guilty in shooting," Feb. 20). Mr. Gladden, a minor, made his plea in adult court. This is a travesty of justice for a 15-year-old who was never given a break in life. After following his case, it appears to me that he is a troubled teen who desperately needs help.
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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
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FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Regarding your report on the guilty plea of alleged school shooter Robert Gladden Jr., I am a firm believer that before judges and prosecutors send a defendant to jail, they should spend some time incarcerated themselves to experience the conditions a prisoner faces ("Gladden pleads guilty in shooting," Feb. 20). Mr. Gladden, a minor, made his plea in adult court. This is a travesty of justice for a 15-year-old who was never given a break in life. After following his case, it appears to me that he is a troubled teen who desperately needs help.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 22, 1991
"Shoot First: A Cop's Vengeance" is in part about police officers meting out justice vigilante style.To NBC, the docudrama that airs at 9 Sunday on WMAR-TV (Channel 2), is only entertainment.But in light of the disturbing videotape we have all seen of Los Angeles police officers viciously beating an unarmed man, it seems important to ask whether such television shows about cops and violence are ever only "entertainment."A question worth considering when watching movies like "A Cop's Vengeance" might be: Has make-believe television contributed to a real-life belief among many police officers -- and others of us -- that excessive police violence is OK?
NEWS
March 20, 2003
THE AMERICAN urge to set right the miscreants of the world certainly didn't begin with Iraq. Nor did the conviction among some Americans that theirs was the cause of justice and righteousness - whatever the particular cause of the moment might be. Here's one example: In the years after World War I, one of the losing countries, Turkey, came in for harsh criticism because of its violent treatment of Christian Greeks and Armenians and because of its general...
NEWS
June 28, 1997
THE FAMILY OF murdered Baltimore policeman Vincent J. Adolfo has been waiting a long time to watch Flint Gregory Hunt die. Nearly 12 years have passed since Hunt killed Adolfo. His appeals are finally exhausted. Sometime in the next few days the Adolfo family will watch Hunt expire from lethal injection, hoping at last for peace.Perhaps they will find it. Perhaps not; many survivors have found execution an ineffectual pain killer. Regardless, Americans generally agree that the justice system should heed victims who say nothing less than an eye for an eye will satisfy them or help them heal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 1998
The darkened apartment conveys all the warmth of a cave. No furniture, an empty refrigerator, a musty bathroom where the last shredded square of toilet paper clings to the roll.The 18-year-old hacker who lives here, in Irvine, Calif., says he doesn't need much, only a fictional world within the glow of his computer screen.He goes by the name Vengeance. Or Mr. Vengeance to strangers. He is a digital bounty hunter, a for-hire computer game player who punishes bullies on the Internet.He picked the name because it suits him better than the one his parents gave him. After all, who has ever heard of a vigilante named Tom Reginald?
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Frank Langfitt and Jon Morgan and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Marina Sarris contributed to this article | December 5, 1995
After 11 years in National Football League purgatory, Maryland returned with a vengeance yesterday, when the Washington Redskins and top government officials announced plans for a new stadium in Prince George's County.Mr. Cooke declined to say how he would vote on the Browns.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | September 23, 2001
NEW YORK -- On the second morning after terrorists toppled the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the Gospel read at all Catholic Masses was especially challenging: In no uncertain terms, Jesus told his followers to "turn the other cheek," to forgive their enemies, to do good to those who hate them. The reading from the Gospel of Luke might not have been what some churchgoers hoped to hear as they tried to cope with the death of thousands of people in surprise terror attacks on New York and Washington.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
A year ago, the River Hill wrestling team had what coach Brandon Lauer called "an unprecedented meltdown" in the 4A-3A East regional finals. This year, the Hawks were determined not to let it happen again. "Coach told us we could win," sophomore Corey Daniel said after collecting his regional championship certificate at 160 pounds. "Our coach said it, so we knew we could. It feels great. For me, it felt great to get that pin in the second period. I've never won the region title before, never, never.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun reporter | July 29, 2008
Bart Scott is ready to rumble. Yes, again. The Ravens' self-proclaimed "Mad Backer" has become the Furious Backer in the aftermath of a gruesome, 5-11 season in 2007. In a friendly exchange with the media this week, Scott issued these training camp warnings to this year's opponents: * "I'm extremely [ticked] off, more than ever, because we were down and teams stomped on us a little bit, but they didn't finish us. I guarantee if we get the opportunity, we're going to stomp them into the ground."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 17, 2008
After hearing one of his military bands play an arrangement of music from Richard Strauss' opera Elektra, England's George V reportedly said, "His majesty does not know what the band has just played, but it is never to be played again." Even now, 99 years after the premiere of Elektra, it is bound to strike some listeners as a little scary. Poor George is just lucky he never heard the singing that goes with it, or confronted its bloody plot.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 14, 2007
Jodie Foster, who earned an Oscar nomination 32 years ago for playing a child prostitute in Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver, plays a more cultured character in The Brave One, an illegitimate heir to that incendiary mid-1970s masterpiece. Here she's a radio personality who reports poetically on the changing face of New York until her own face is beaten to a pulp. Then the whole thing turns into trash with flash. The Brave One (Warner Bros.) Starring Jodie Foster, Terrence Howard. Directed by Neil Jordan.
FEATURES
November 17, 2006
THE QUESTION The award season is just around the corner. What movies and/or actors do you consider to be Oscar contenders? you're such a critic WHAT YOU SAY For my money, the Best Picture, so far, has been either L'Enfant or Lady Vengeance (best American movie has been Little Miss Sunshine), while the best acting awards, again so far, belong to Forest Whitaker (The Last King of Scotland) and Helen Mirren (The Queen). PETER MUNCIE, COLUMBIA In the acting realm, the compelling, carefully nuanced performance of Forest Whitaker, as a deranged dictator in The Last King of Scotland, gets my nod. In the film category, I'm going with Martin Scorsese's The Departed.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | September 8, 2005
TIME IN the NFL is winding down for Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis, but there is still enough left for one more good, possibly great season. We're not talking great as in the Ray Lewis of the past, when he was the most intimidating, indestructible and game-changing force in the league. Those days are gone. We're now talking about a player who has been in the league 10 years, still runs extremely well, can still make others around him better and will always play with a strong passion and knowledge of the game.
FEATURES
November 17, 2006
THE QUESTION The award season is just around the corner. What movies and/or actors do you consider to be Oscar contenders? you're such a critic WHAT YOU SAY For my money, the Best Picture, so far, has been either L'Enfant or Lady Vengeance (best American movie has been Little Miss Sunshine), while the best acting awards, again so far, belong to Forest Whitaker (The Last King of Scotland) and Helen Mirren (The Queen). PETER MUNCIE, COLUMBIA In the acting realm, the compelling, carefully nuanced performance of Forest Whitaker, as a deranged dictator in The Last King of Scotland, gets my nod. In the film category, I'm going with Martin Scorsese's The Departed.
FEATURES
September 16, 1990
Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal, 81, a concentration-camp survivor, was responsible for finding Adolf Eichmann, as well as the SS officer who arrested Anne Frank. In "Justice Not Vengeance" (Grove Weidenfeld), he tells his life story.Q: Why have you devoted your life to bringing Nazis to justice?A: When I was liberated, I didn't know that my wife was alive. I thought I had no one left in the world and that there was no reason for me to live. Then I learned about the War Crimes Office. It was a chance for me to help.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 7, 2004
The first movie Mel Gibson put his name and his face on after The Passion of the Christ is a petulant, violent and sophomoric hissy fit about those nasty photographers who torment the rich and famous. Talk about your false prophets. Paparazzi, which Gibson produced and further endorsed by making a cameo - and not nailing anybody's hand to anything this time - is just vile. Every ugly story ever attached to the vultures who make their living taking candid shots of celebrities is repeated.
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