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NEWS
August 12, 2004
VENEZUELANS determined to recall President Hugo Chavez face a formidable challenge this weekend: They must vote in numbers greater than the 3.8 million who elected the leftist-populist to office in 2000. The challenge for Mr. Chavez is to keep his government from interfering in the referendum Sunday. In a country of 13.9 million registered voters, opposition groups managed to gather the millions of signatures needed for the recall vote. They got the signatures not once, but twice, after the national electoral counsel invalidated thousands of them in March.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Ron Sanchez's roots in horse racing go deep into his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where his maternal grandmother took him to the races every weekend at La Rinconada, the country's largest and oldest track. "I was five years old and we'd walk all the way to the track, it's like two miles," Sanchez recalled Monday at Pimlico. "I fall in love [with horse racing]. Once you get here [to the race track], it's impossible to get out. " Though Sanchez also dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player - he was a member of the Venezuelan national team in his late teens and said he "almost signed" a pro contract - the love of racing never left.
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NEWS
May 26, 1993
The indictment and suspension of President Carlos Andres Perez for corruption probably protects rather than endangers Venezuela's 35-year old democracy. But it imperils economic reform and growth in the second-largest foreign supplier of oil to the United States. How much better if Mr. Perez had been able to serve out his term until the election in December, and complete his reforms.President from 1974 to 1979, Mr. Perez is the grand old democratic politician of the Americas. He was the populist who nationalized Venezuela's oil and steel industries.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Carrying protest signs in English and Spanish, opponents of the Venezuelan government rallied peacefully Saturday at the World Trade Center in Baltimore in solidarity with demonstrations in the South American country against the administration of President Nicolas Maduro. About 80 people had gathered by early afternoon, standing in a circle in front of the building hoisting the country's yellow, blue and red flag, chanting anti-government slogans and listening to Venezuelan folk songs on a boom box. The demonstration was meant to coincide with others taking place in 70 cities around the world to bring international pressure on Maduro's government, which opponents blame for political repression, rampant crime and shortages of basic goods.
NEWS
By Michael Marx McCarthy | December 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The fervor for "regime change" in Iraq is spreading to another oil-producing nation: Venezuela. President Hugo Chavez's increasingly beleaguered government is losing traction daily as the Democratic Coordinator - an umbrella opposition group of business, labor and civil society - smothers Venezuela's petroleum-driven economy in a perpetual general strike that intends to induce regime change, possibly at the cost of protracted civil strife....
NEWS
December 20, 2002
AS THE GENERAL STRIKE that has crippled Venezuela's critical oil industry and much of the nation's economy nears the end of its third week, that polarized nation faces the dangerous prospect of heightened conflict between militant foes and supporters of President Hugo Chavez. To protect Venezuela's embattled democratic institutions and help stabilize the world oil market, the United States and the international community should help resolve the impasse by bolstering the moderate voices who are seeking a solution that respects the country's 1999 constitution.
NEWS
By Franz Schneiderman | April 18, 2002
IT'S A sad day for American democracy when the leaders of countries whose human rights records and democratic practices are as deeply flawed as those of Paraguay and Peru show more respect for democratic institutions and the rule of law than the U.S. government demonstrates. But that's what happened last weekend, after elements of Venezuela's military led a coup that briefly ousted the country's elected president, Hugo Chavez. Mr. Chavez's return to office is a triumph for his country's embattled democratic institutions and for the popularly elected leaders who stood behind his government.
NEWS
December 7, 1993
The good news is that Venezuela elected a president to keep its 35 years of democracy going, escaping the rumored threat of a military coup.The bad news is that the winner, Rafael Caldera, will be 78 at the start of his five-year term next year, that his mandate is only 28.5 percent of the vote, and that he ran as a maverick backed by 17 parties ranging from crypto-Fascist to Communist that can agree on nothing else.The problem for the disgusted Venezuelan electorate was to reject the corruption of the deposed President Carlos Andres Perez, reject the Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-Dee of the two-party politics that succeeded military dictatorship in 1958, and yet not succumb to the lure of military dictatorship again.
SPORTS
By Boston Globe | July 5, 1992
PORTLAND, Ore. -- It was going to be so much fun. Oscar Schmidt and Marcel De Souza were going to fulfill their long-standing dream of playing against the great American professionals. There would be a vast TV audience in Brazil. It would be one of the highlights of their lives.Instead, Brazil will play Puerto Rico today, not in the Tournament of the Americas final. The Brazilians forgot to take care of the necessary business Friday night, losing a 10-point second half lead, missing 13 consecutive shots down the stretch and eventually losing to Venezuela, 100-91.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2004
CARACAS, Venezuela - A campaign by opposition groups for a recall referendum to try to oust President Hugo Chavez appeared on the brink of collapse yesterday. Opposition leaders, expecting election officials to disqualify enough of the 3.4 million signatures they have collected for a recall to keep the measure off the ballot, accused Chavez of unfairly influencing the process. Protesters battled National Guard troops across the country in anti-government demonstrations that began Friday.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
I teach at Towson University in the College of Liberal Arts, where it is part of our core mission to help students develop their critical thinking abilities - a skills platform essential for career advancement. One key skill is finding the best available evidence and using it to inform one's opinions. Former Governor Ehrlich writes that "under Chávez, life for Venezuela's poor only got worse" and that "public health [in Venezuela] is deplorable. " ("On student loans, Hugo Chavez and Joe Flacco's taxes," Mar 31.)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 31, 2013
Remember when President Barack Obama stuck a federal takeover of the student loan program into the "Affordable Care Act," AKA "Obamacare"? The dirty deed was accompanied by a promise that federal control would save taxpayer money and cut off all the private sector profiteers anxious to put the screws to student loan applicants. Now comes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York with a daunting report on the grand experiment: A startling 35 percent of student loan-borrowers under 30 years of age were 90 days or more late in their payments as of December 31, up from 26 percent in 2008 and 21 percent in 2004.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
When you think of Caracas, Venezuela, you might think of a lively, colorful place. If you're an IndyCar fan, you might think of E.J. Viso, who drives the No. 5 IndyCar fielded by KV Racing Technology. He is recognized as the only Hispanic in the IZOD IndyCar Series, as well as one of the most friendly competitors on tour, with a warm, welcoming smile. Viso could also be known as one of the most generous, in terms of his desire to give back to young drivers in his country, who are trying to make it in major league open wheel racing.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 5, 2012
I am starting to feel sorry for Mitt Romney. On an international tour to three countries, he made news in two of them by dissing the London Olympics and infuriating the Palestinians. The poor guy -- for months, people have complained that he never says what he really believes. Now, he's in trouble for too boldly saying what he actually thinks. First, during an interview with NBC News anchorman Brian Williams, Mr. Romney had this to say about prospects of success for the London games: "It's hard to know just how well it will turn out. There are a few things that were disconcerting: the stories about the private security firm not having enough people, supposed strike of the immigration and customs officials, that obviously is not something which is encouraging.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
The Obama administration's continued indifference to the actions of the Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez is dangerous on several fronts ("Hugo Chavez compares his rival to Mitt Romney," July 23). President Barack Obama recently made the startling comment that Mr. Chavez poses no threat to U.S. national security. Yet the Venezuelan dictator has shown off Russian weaponry and Iranian drones and extended his country's hospitality to Hezbollah, which has been permitted to establish training camps on Margarita Island.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
When Archbishop Spalding wrestler Logan Breitenbach got off the plane in Maracaibo, Venezuela, he faced a new reality even before he got to the arena for the 2012 Cadet Pan Am Championships, where he won the gold medal in his 152-pound class. Everywhere isn't like home in Severna Park. And when he did get to the arena, he learned everyone doesn't love American athletes. "When I landed in Venezuela it was a culture shock," he said Tuesday, a day after returning home from the trip that also took him to Fargo, North Dakota for the USA Wrestling Junior & Cadet National Championships and celebrating his 17th birthday.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | November 26, 2007
Communism is dead in Russia, a shell of itself in China and just hanging on in Cuba. But Lenin's corpse has a rare reason to smile. A new workers' paradise is sprouting in Venezuela, under the direction of the sometimes clownish but always cunning President Hugo Chavez. Most of the rest of the world learned the folly of autocratic socialism back in the 20th century, but Mr. Chavez prefers to repeat mistakes rather than learn from them. He has nationalized oil holdings, created new state-run firms, confiscated privately owned land and politicized finance, while endeavoring to take over telecommunications and power companies.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Maryland wrestlers have been competing in the USA Wrestling Junior & Cadet National Championships for the past 50 years. This week, the state will send 65 competitors - its largest group ever - to the event in Fargo, North Dakota. Logan Breitenbach, a rising junior at Archbishop Spalding, is unique among the Maryland representatives because he will be competing in the 2012 FILA Cadet Pan American Wrestling Championships in Maracaibo, Venezuela before heading to Fargo. "I'm really excited to represent my country," Breitenbach said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | January 11, 2012
Melvin Mora's retirement has been greatly exaggerated. Or at least exaggerated for this country, he claims. A report out of Venezuela last month said that Mora, who played most of his career with the Orioles, issued a tearful retirement announcement while playing winter ball in Venezuela. The story ran in several places, including The Sun. But Mora said that was news to him. Despite multiple reports to the contrary out of Venezuela, Mora said what he announced was that he was no longer going to play in Venezuela because he didn't want to leave his family every year.
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