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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 14, 1996
About 50 battery- and solar-powered vehicles will swing through Maryland today and tomorrow as part of the Tour de Sol, a weeklong road rally from New York City to Washington to demonstrate the practicality of electric cars and trucks.The vehicles, which set out from New York on Sunday, are scheduled to reach Chesapeake City in Cecil County this morning, after departing from Pottstown, Pa. They will travel south on the Eastern Shore tomorrow and cross the Bay Bridge to Sandy Point State Park, where the cars and trucks will be on display overnight.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Thousands of new and unsold automobiles are parked at ports across the country - another sign of just how badly car sales are faring. At the port of Baltimore, more than 57,000 unsold domestic and imported cars sit on land near the docks. And state officials recently bought about 15 acres off Broening Highway as they seek more space to store the backlog of cargo. In normal times, cars that Mercedes, Kia, Subaru, Hyundai, Volvo and others ship to Baltimore might sit in terminals for a week or so before being sent by truck or rail to dealers who would sell them to waiting customers.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | January 12, 2006
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co. again is facing the threat of a boycott of its vehicles in the United States. The American Family Association, along with 41 other organizations nationwide, sent a letter to Chairman William Clay Ford Jr., yesterday giving the automaker an ultimatum to stop supporting homosexual groups and pull its ads from gay publications or risk a boycott of Ford products by the conservative Christian group. "We strongly suggest that Ford remove itself from involvement in the cultural war and apply its resources to building the best product possible," AFA Chairman Donald E. Wildmon said in the letter, which was sent Tuesday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 12, 1999
State police in Westminster are advising owners of all-terrain vehicles to take extra care when storing the popular four-wheelers, saying more than a half-dozen have been stolen since the beginning of summer.Thieves pried a lock from a Hampstead homeowner's shed in the 900 block of Houcksville Road about 1 a.m. Sunday and stole two all-terrain vehicles, state police said.The loss was estimated at $6,850.Troopers at the Westminster barracks say owners should place the four-wheelers out of sight in locked buildings when not using them, and chain the vehicles, if possible, to a stable post within the building.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
With more than a million miles on the road, Armand Patella's 19-year-old Ford 9000 truck has seen better days. But he's hung onto it, because new trucks aren't cheap. Patella, the head of Picorp trucking service on East Lombard Street, still uses the 1992 vehicle to move empty or lightly loaded containers around the port of Baltimore.  "It's had a new engine or two," Patella said last week, "but it's paid for. " Now, though, a program aimed at making the community's air healthier to breathe is encouraging Patella and other short-haul truck operators serving the port to trade in their soot-belching clunkers for newer, cleaner vehicles.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 2, 2004
At least one person was injured yesterday evening when five vehicles, including a tractor-trailer, collided in the Harbor Tunnel, authorities said. The southbound tube was closed for maintenance at the time of the accident, about 7:30 p.m., and the open tube was handling traffic in both directions, police said. According to an initial account from police, the accident was triggered by one vehicle crossing the center line and colliding with an oncoming vehicle. Three other vehicles, including the tractor-trailer, also became involved.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | August 6, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley, whose administration has become increasingly focused on energy policy, announced plans yesterday to build ethanol pump stations around Maryland so the state's 1,200 flex-fuel vehicles can more easily fill up with the renewable fuel. The state has never been able to meet a goal set more than seven years ago under Gov. Parris N. Glendening's administration that flex-fuel vehicles in the state's fleet use alternative fuels half the time on average. State auditors have criticized the Maryland Energy Administration several times for falling short of that goal and making no formal timetable to meet it. The crux of the problem has been a lack of infrastructure.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
A three-vehicle crash clogged traffic on Interstate 95 north in past exit 67 to White Marsh Boulevard in Baltimore County Wednesday afternoon. A state police official said no injuries were reported. The crash happened shortly after 3:30 p.m., closing two right hand lanes and shoulder. jkanderson@baltsun.com twitter.com/janders5
BUSINESS
By Rick Popely and Jim Mateja and Rick Popely and Jim Mateja,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 8, 2003
Federal auto safety regulators are launching a new test to simulate how likely vehicles are to roll over in emergency maneuvers. The dynamic test simulates a panic maneuver at 35 to 50 mph in which a driver would abruptly turn the wheel left to avoid going off the road and then steer back to the right into the proper lane. Congress mandated a dynamic rollover test for new vehicles in 2000 in response to nearly 300 rollover deaths attributed to Firestone tire failures. Most of the deaths occurred in Ford Explorer sport utility vehicles.
NEWS
By Ricardo A. Zaldivar and Ricardo A. Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - The bad habits of gas-guzzling, road-hogging sport utility vehicles are a red-hot topic, but consumers bought 4 million of them last year, and the Bush administration is unlikely to impose safety and environmental changes that could kill the market. America's infatuation with the off-road behemoths that became a suburban creature comfort doesn't seem headed toward a rejection of SUVs - only a desire to tame them by making them less prone to flip over or crush cars in collisions, and somewhat less wasteful of fuel.
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