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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Toll cheaters who use Maryland E-ZPass lanes without a transponder will get hit with a $50 fine and could have their vehicle registration suspended under a law that took effect July 1. The Maryland Transportation Authority, operator of eight toll facilities, has begun the transition to the new collection process, which officials said will plug a loophole and allow them to recover as much as $7 million in overdue tolls. "It's not about money," said Bruce Gartner, MdTA acting executive secretary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 9, 2014
It's a pretty safe bet that the year and month a vehicle registration is due for renewal is unknown to the average car owner living in Maryland or anywhere else for that matter. Most of us probably can't recall our tag number (even though it's a useful bit of information when registering at a hotel) let alone when it's time to get new stickers. So it's understandable that the latest misstep by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration - a delay in sending out registration renewal notices by mail - caught some drivers off-guard.
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NEWS
July 9, 2014
It's a pretty safe bet that the year and month a vehicle registration is due for renewal is unknown to the average car owner living in Maryland or anywhere else for that matter. Most of us probably can't recall our tag number (even though it's a useful bit of information when registering at a hotel) let alone when it's time to get new stickers. So it's understandable that the latest misstep by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration - a delay in sending out registration renewal notices by mail - caught some drivers off-guard.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Toll cheaters who use Maryland E-ZPass lanes without a transponder will get hit with a $50 fine and could have their vehicle registration suspended under a law that took effect July 1. The Maryland Transportation Authority, operator of eight toll facilities, has begun the transition to the new collection process, which officials said will plug a loophole and allow them to recover as much as $7 million in overdue tolls. "It's not about money," said Bruce Gartner, MdTA acting executive secretary.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Carroll sheriff's deputies will crack down on county motorists who fail to register their vehicles and obtain Maryland license plates, Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning said yesterday.After an initial public awareness campaign -- about 30 days -- deputies will concentrate on vehicles with out-of-state plates and check to see where the owners live, the sheriff's office said.State law requires new residents to register vehicles and obtain a Maryland driver's license within 30 days.The county is taking advantage of first-time state grants to pay overtime costs for the crackdown, said Maj. John Stultz, operations commander for Tregoning.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Carroll sheriff's deputies will crack down on county motorists who fail to register their vehicles and obtain Maryland license plates, Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning said yesterday.After an initial public awareness campaign -- about 30 days -- deputies will concentrate on vehicles with out-of-state plates and check to see where the owners live, the sheriff's office said.State law requires new residents to register vehicles and obtain a Maryland driver's license within 30 days.The county is taking advantage of first-time state grants to pay overtime costs for the crackdown, said Maj. John Stultz, operations commander for Tregoning.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
The more than 1 million vehicle registration renewal forms being sent to Maryland motorists over the next year will be accompanied by something extra - ads for a free oil change and $25 off on an eye exam. The advertising packets are part of an agreement between two state agencies and a Waltham, Mass.-based company that saves the Motor Vehicle Administration $100,000 a year and helps the Department of Business and Economic Development promote in-state tourism. Imagitas Inc. has taken over the printing and mailing of the MVA's vehicle registration forms in exchange for the right to include advertisements in the envelope.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1997
Hoping to ease consumer logjams that haunt nearly all vehicle registration and licensing transactions, state Motor Vehicle Administration officials this week said they are searching for a site to open a full-service office in Essex by 1999.With development booming in the eastern portion of Baltimore County -- including sprawl in White Marsh and Perry Hall -- officials said the county needs its first all-purpose center, offering driving tests as well as renewal, registration and titling services.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
Annapolis police are investigating whether an incident Sunday in which a Calvert County husband and wife were injured by a crowd that threw bottles and rocks at their car in Eastport was drug-related. After the attack on Madison Street near the Harbor House public housing neighborhood, the victims - identified by police as Gregory Louis Mercillott and Juanita Jean Mercillott - drove to the Bay Ridge Avenue fire station to seek help for head injuries, saying they had been shot, police said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Howard County Council Chairman Calvin Ball has proposed a bill that would allow the police department to tow a vehicle after only one citation, a move designed to help the county collect $376,000 in outstanding fines. The measure would "empower the finance and police department to enforce the law," said Ball, who introduced the measure Oct. 3. Under the plan, the finance department, which oversees the collection of parking fines, would designate vehicles with outstanding violations and alert the police department that they were eligible for impoundment.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Baltimore County police had received reports of suspicious people in a Dundalk neighborhood when they stopped Joshua Michael Lopez, who they said fit the description. That seemingly routine stop ended with Lopez, 22, dead after police said he scuffled with the officers, leaving the family of the Navy quartermaster assigned to a ship docked in Norfolk wondering how and why police shot and killed the unarmed man. The family is in a "bit of a shock, trying to find answers. Everything is just up in the air. We have no clue" how he died, said Lopez's mother, Tosha, who lives in Texas.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Howard County Council Chairman Calvin Ball has proposed a bill that would allow the police department to tow a vehicle after only one citation, a move designed to help the county collect $376,000 in outstanding fines. The measure would "empower the finance and police department to enforce the law," said Ball, who introduced the measure Oct. 3. Under the plan, the finance department, which oversees the collection of parking fines, would designate vehicles with outstanding violations and alert the police department that they were eligible for impoundment.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
Annapolis police are investigating whether an incident Sunday in which a Calvert County husband and wife were injured by a crowd that threw bottles and rocks at their car in Eastport was drug-related. After the attack on Madison Street near the Harbor House public housing neighborhood, the victims - identified by police as Gregory Louis Mercillott and Juanita Jean Mercillott - drove to the Bay Ridge Avenue fire station to seek help for head injuries, saying they had been shot, police said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
The more than 1 million vehicle registration renewal forms being sent to Maryland motorists over the next year will be accompanied by something extra - ads for a free oil change and $25 off on an eye exam. The advertising packets are part of an agreement between two state agencies and a Waltham, Mass.-based company that saves the Motor Vehicle Administration $100,000 a year and helps the Department of Business and Economic Development promote in-state tourism. Imagitas Inc. has taken over the printing and mailing of the MVA's vehicle registration forms in exchange for the right to include advertisements in the envelope.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
Drivers will pay more to register their cars, thousands of seniors will receive cheaper prescription drugs and police officers will begin compiling statistics on race in traffic stops under new Maryland laws that take effect tomorrow. In the 90-day legislative session that ended in April, the General Assembly approved 169 new laws or changes to existing laws that begin July 1. Another 13 bills passed in previous years also go on the books tomorrow. While many are routine or narrow -- such as the bill that changes the way young oysters and clams can be captured for aquaculture -- others have widespread impact.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Carroll sheriff's deputies will crack down on county motorists who fail to register their vehicles and obtain Maryland license plates, Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning said yesterday.After an initial public awareness campaign -- about 30 days -- deputies will concentrate on vehicles with out-of-state plates and check to see where the owners live, the sheriff's office said.State law requires new residents to register vehicles and obtain a Maryland driver's license within 30 days.The county is taking advantage of first-time state grants to pay overtime costs for the crackdown, said Maj. John Stultz, operations commander for Tregoning.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Baltimore County police had received reports of suspicious people in a Dundalk neighborhood when they stopped Joshua Michael Lopez, who they said fit the description. That seemingly routine stop ended with Lopez, 22, dead after police said he scuffled with the officers, leaving the family of the Navy quartermaster assigned to a ship docked in Norfolk wondering how and why police shot and killed the unarmed man. The family is in a "bit of a shock, trying to find answers. Everything is just up in the air. We have no clue" how he died, said Lopez's mother, Tosha, who lives in Texas.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
Drivers will pay more to register their cars, thousands of seniors will receive cheaper prescription drugs and police officers will begin compiling statistics on race in traffic stops under new Maryland laws that take effect tomorrow. In the 90-day legislative session that ended in April, the General Assembly approved 169 new laws or changes to existing laws that begin July 1. Another 13 bills passed in previous years also go on the books tomorrow. While many are routine or narrow -- such as the bill that changes the way young oysters and clams can be captured for aquaculture -- others have widespread impact.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Carroll sheriff's deputies will crack down on county motorists who fail to register their vehicles and obtain Maryland license plates, Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning said yesterday.After an initial public awareness campaign -- about 30 days -- deputies will concentrate on vehicles with out-of-state plates and check to see where the owners live, the sheriff's office said.State law requires new residents to register vehicles and obtain a Maryland driver's license within 30 days.The county is taking advantage of first-time state grants to pay overtime costs for the crackdown, said Maj. John Stultz, operations commander for Tregoning.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
Maryland new-car dealers launched the year on a down slope as sales dipped 4.4 percent in January, according to figures released yesterday by the Motor Vehicle Administration.It was the fifth consecutive month in which sales were lower than in the corresponding period of the previous year. Sales have been off in eight of the past nine months."Business was a little soft last month," said Robert C. Russel, president of R&H Motor Cars Ltd. in Owings Mills and chairman of the Maryland New Car and Truck Dealers Association, a trade group representing 320 new car dealers in the state.
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