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Vehicle Administration

NEWS
July 23, 1991
Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration of the Department of Transportation recently has increased fees.The most significant increasewill be the renewal of a driver's license, which is good for a four-year period.The cost will be $16.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Thousands of immigrants living here without legal permission will start the new year demonstrating skills in parallel parking and two-point turns in hopes of becoming licensed drivers in Maryland. Maryland joins a handful of states on Jan. 1 that issue so-called "second-tier" licenses that allow immigrants who do not have full legal documentation to drive on Maryland roads, register cars and obtain insurance. The licenses will not suffice as federal identification. Nearly 13,000 immigrants have signed up to take driving tests in the coming weeks, according to state officials.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
The Motor Vehicle Administration calls it the "skills test" because it gauges many of the skills that drivers need to master before they're allowed to motor off alone in traffic. But many novices lined up nervously in their automobiles at the MVA's Glen Burnie office will tell you that there's only one part of the test that stands between them and a license: parallel parking. It is the most common reason people flunk. And it worried Darlarene Morgan, 26, of Baltimore, who practiced parallel parking 15 times before the state examiner climbed into the passenger seat of her mother's car with his clipboard one recent morning.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Rattling off bids in a singsong chant, auctioneer Tom Henline moved along a line of impounded vehicles yesterday followed by a swarm of bidders, each clutching a small scrap of paper imprinted with a number. "Show me the number! Show me the number!" he said after each successful bid as Pied Piper-like he led the buyers to the next car for sale near the Pulaski Highway impound lot. With Henline, a West Virginian, doing the rapid-fire hawking, Baltimore officials offered a record number of cars, minivans, and trucks, more than 900, in two auctions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
NEWS
November 12, 1997
The state Motor Vehicle Administration in Glen Burnie has expanded operator-assisted hours for customers.The hours of the Customer Service Center are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.The toll-free number for Maryland, Northern Virginia and Washington is 1-800-950-1MVA; for Glen Burnie residents, 410-768-7000.Pub Date: 11/12/97
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
With the sun coming up on Sept. 12, 2001, state Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari drove home for a change of clothes after a day of helping direct Maryland's response to the terrorist attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people the previous morning. "I remember saying to myself that the world will never be the same, and that's certainly true of the transportation world," said Porcari, now deputy secretary in theU.S. Department of Transportation. Sweeping changes that have affected virtually every mode of transportation in the United States began almost immediately after hijacked airliners slammed into the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon outside Washington and a farm field in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Maryland's largest state employee union is set to begin collecting fees from nonmembers this month — a move that sets up the Maryland chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees for what could be a $4.7 million gain over the fiscal year. AFSCME sees the additional money as a matter of fairness, since the union negotiates contracts with the state on behalf of all its bargaining members, though fewer than half pay dues. Union officials say the extra money will allow them to improve services.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2004
Branch offices of the state Motor Vehicle Administration could not complete some transactions for about an hour yesterday morning because a glitch kept them from connecting with the agency's mainframe computer, officials said. The glitch was the result of a software update over the weekend and was discovered when branch offices opened at 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The problem was fixed and the system was back up by 9:35. MVA offices were shut down for a day in August when the agency's computers crashed because of a computer virus.
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