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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael James contributed to this article | November 18, 1992
Dontay Carter, the East Baltimore teen-ager charged in a kidnapping spree that struck a nerve in a city plagued by violence, was convicted yesterday of snatching a man from a downtown parking garage and beating him to death in a burned-out rowhouse.A Baltimore Circuit Court jury deliberated for 9 1/2 hours over two days before finding Carter guilty on all nine counts in the slaying of Vitalis V. Pilius, a 37-year-old father of four young children from Catonsville.Carter, who denied the charges, stood with his hands in his pockets while the jury forewoman pronounced him guilty of first-degree murder, kidnapping, armed robbery, conspiracy and weapons violations.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Thousands of immigrants living here without legal permission will start the new year demonstrating skills in parallel parking and two-point turns in hopes of becoming licensed drivers in Maryland. Maryland joins a handful of states on Jan. 1 that issue so-called "second-tier" licenses that allow immigrants who do not have full legal documentation to drive on Maryland roads, register cars and obtain insurance. The licenses will not suffice as federal identification. Nearly 13,000 immigrants have signed up to take driving tests in the coming weeks, according to state officials.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
When Jim Maguire returned to his Pikesville home recently after a week out of town, he found a reminder from the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration to renew the registration on his car waiting in the pile of mail. "I was just going to set it aside and look at it in another month," the longtime Marylander said. "I just assumed it didn't apply to me immediately. " Luckily he didn't, because it did. Maguire, 53, was one of thousands of Marylanders who were sent notices to renew their vehicle registrations days before their tags were due to expire.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Rattling off bids in a singsong chant, auctioneer Tom Henline moved along a line of impounded vehicles yesterday followed by a swarm of bidders, each clutching a small scrap of paper imprinted with a number. "Show me the number! Show me the number!" he said after each successful bid as Pied Piper-like he led the buyers to the next car for sale near the Pulaski Highway impound lot. With Henline, a West Virginian, doing the rapid-fire hawking, Baltimore officials offered a record number of cars, minivans, and trucks, more than 900, in two auctions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
NEWS
July 23, 1991
Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration of the Department of Transportation recently has increased fees.The most significant increasewill be the renewal of a driver's license, which is good for a four-year period.The cost will be $16.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A 49-year-old convicted robber was indicted yesterday on murder and rape charges in the strangulation death of an 18-year-old woman whose body was found in a Northeast Baltimore stream in 1998, law enforcement officials said. City prosecutors and police said DNA evidence provided critical help in reopening the investigation into the death of Jada Danita Lambert and led to the indictment of Roy S. Davis, who is serving a state prison sentence in Hagerstown for armed robbery. The murder of Lambert was one of about 4,000 city homicide and sexual assault cold cases that include potential DNA evidence that is being methodically tested by private labs.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
Jason Pharmaceuticals Inc. grew fat when Oprah got thin, and thin when Oprah got fat again.That much is agreed upon by everyone connected with the Owings Mills-based marketer of the Medifast diet plan. But the agreement ends there.After rising to $51 million in annual sales during the late 1980s, the skyrocket that was Jason Pharmaceuticals landed last month in Baltimore's federal bankruptcy court, asking for protection from creditors while it reorganizes.Members of Jason's founding Vitale family say the company can recover from the slump that hit the liquid-diet industry after television talk show host Oprah Winfrey regained the weight she had lost on a rival plan called Optifast.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
Maryland officials are coming out with a high-tech, hard-to-duplicate driver's license aimed at thwarting underage drinkers and others with criminal intent. And it comes in colors. Although the state's driver's license was in the news recently because one of the president's daughters got caught with a fake Maryland ID at a Connecticut bar, Motor Vehicle Administration officials say they have been planning a makeover for the past couple of years, bowing to the computer-age technology that has turned document forgery into a cottage industry.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the long wait gun buyers must endure while state police background checks are completed, I can agree that the Maryland gun community is very unhappy and that the government can't work miracles. But beyond that, there are a lot of problems with your view ("Background check backlog," June 11). They start with your comparing this situation to a supply problem. Comparing it to the wait times at the Motor Vehicle Administration is a bit more accurate, but the equivalent would be more like the MVA asking people to wait three or four weeks to get their tags, and then telling them they can't drive the car until they arrive (there are no temporary tags in the gun world)
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