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Vehicle Administration

NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
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NEWS
July 23, 1991
Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration of the Department of Transportation recently has increased fees.The most significant increasewill be the renewal of a driver's license, which is good for a four-year period.The cost will be $16.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
NEWS
November 12, 1997
The state Motor Vehicle Administration in Glen Burnie has expanded operator-assisted hours for customers.The hours of the Customer Service Center are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.The toll-free number for Maryland, Northern Virginia and Washington is 1-800-950-1MVA; for Glen Burnie residents, 410-768-7000.Pub Date: 11/12/97
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
With the sun coming up on Sept. 12, 2001, state Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari drove home for a change of clothes after a day of helping direct Maryland's response to the terrorist attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people the previous morning. "I remember saying to myself that the world will never be the same, and that's certainly true of the transportation world," said Porcari, now deputy secretary in theU.S. Department of Transportation. Sweeping changes that have affected virtually every mode of transportation in the United States began almost immediately after hijacked airliners slammed into the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon outside Washington and a farm field in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 26, 2009
Just before 2 a.m. on a quiet residential street in Parkville, one man's problems - missed car payments, default notice, threat of repossession - were about to boost another's bottom line. Tony Atkins deftly backed his Midnight Express-brand towing rig under a Chevy Impala. With a glance up at a row of darkened homes, Atkins pulled away, the car's emergency brake squeaking behind his rumbling truck. The capture took all of five seconds. "Hey, there's one," Atkins said, keeping score early on this recent frigid morning.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Rattling off bids in a singsong chant, auctioneer Tom Henline moved along a line of impounded vehicles yesterday followed by a swarm of bidders, each clutching a small scrap of paper imprinted with a number. "Show me the number! Show me the number!" he said after each successful bid as Pied Piper-like he led the buyers to the next car for sale near the Pulaski Highway impound lot. With Henline, a West Virginian, doing the rapid-fire hawking, Baltimore officials offered a record number of cars, minivans, and trucks, more than 900, in two auctions.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
Jason Pharmaceuticals Inc. grew fat when Oprah got thin, and thin when Oprah got fat again.That much is agreed upon by everyone connected with the Owings Mills-based marketer of the Medifast diet plan. But the agreement ends there.After rising to $51 million in annual sales during the late 1980s, the skyrocket that was Jason Pharmaceuticals landed last month in Baltimore's federal bankruptcy court, asking for protection from creditors while it reorganizes.Members of Jason's founding Vitale family say the company can recover from the slump that hit the liquid-diet industry after television talk show host Oprah Winfrey regained the weight she had lost on a rival plan called Optifast.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley thinks that if you don't pay taxes, you shouldn't get an auto license ( "Driver's licenses, vehicle registrations may be denied over owed taxes," Feb. 2). Result: many drivers without licenses, unregulated by the Motor Vehicle Administration and without liability insurance. Maybe there's a good reason why Maryland would be one of the few states to approve such a law. Jim Astrachan, Baltimore
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2004
Branch offices of the state Motor Vehicle Administration could not complete some transactions for about an hour yesterday morning because a glitch kept them from connecting with the agency's mainframe computer, officials said. The glitch was the result of a software update over the weekend and was discovered when branch offices opened at 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The problem was fixed and the system was back up by 9:35. MVA offices were shut down for a day in August when the agency's computers crashed because of a computer virus.
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