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Vehicle Administration

NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
The Motor Vehicle Administration calls it the "skills test" because it gauges many of the skills that drivers need to master before they're allowed to motor off alone in traffic. But many novices lined up nervously in their automobiles at the MVA's Glen Burnie office will tell you that there's only one part of the test that stands between them and a license: parallel parking. It is the most common reason people flunk. And it worried Darlarene Morgan, 26, of Baltimore, who practiced parallel parking 15 times before the state examiner climbed into the passenger seat of her mother's car with his clipboard one recent morning.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
Maryland officials are coming out with a high-tech, hard-to-duplicate driver's license aimed at thwarting underage drinkers and others with criminal intent. And it comes in colors. Although the state's driver's license was in the news recently because one of the president's daughters got caught with a fake Maryland ID at a Connecticut bar, Motor Vehicle Administration officials say they have been planning a makeover for the past couple of years, bowing to the computer-age technology that has turned document forgery into a cottage industry.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Rattling off bids in a singsong chant, auctioneer Tom Henline moved along a line of impounded vehicles yesterday followed by a swarm of bidders, each clutching a small scrap of paper imprinted with a number. "Show me the number! Show me the number!" he said after each successful bid as Pied Piper-like he led the buyers to the next car for sale near the Pulaski Highway impound lot. With Henline, a West Virginian, doing the rapid-fire hawking, Baltimore officials offered a record number of cars, minivans, and trucks, more than 900, in two auctions.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A 49-year-old convicted robber was indicted yesterday on murder and rape charges in the strangulation death of an 18-year-old woman whose body was found in a Northeast Baltimore stream in 1998, law enforcement officials said. City prosecutors and police said DNA evidence provided critical help in reopening the investigation into the death of Jada Danita Lambert and led to the indictment of Roy S. Davis, who is serving a state prison sentence in Hagerstown for armed robbery. The murder of Lambert was one of about 4,000 city homicide and sexual assault cold cases that include potential DNA evidence that is being methodically tested by private labs.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
NEWS
November 12, 1997
The state Motor Vehicle Administration in Glen Burnie has expanded operator-assisted hours for customers.The hours of the Customer Service Center are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.The toll-free number for Maryland, Northern Virginia and Washington is 1-800-950-1MVA; for Glen Burnie residents, 410-768-7000.Pub Date: 11/12/97
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Maryland's largest state employee union is set to begin collecting fees from nonmembers this month — a move that sets up the Maryland chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees for what could be a $4.7 million gain over the fiscal year. AFSCME sees the additional money as a matter of fairness, since the union negotiates contracts with the state on behalf of all its bargaining members, though fewer than half pay dues. Union officials say the extra money will allow them to improve services.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Stanley Karloff, a grocery store worker and retired minister, walked out of his Pasadena condominium earlier this month and was startled to find that his 2007 Dodge Caravan minivan was missing. After checking with his wife to see if she was driving it, he called 911, only to get some bad news: The car had been towed. MRA Property Management Inc., the agent for Stoney Beach Condominiums, a sprawling development with views of the Patapsco River, recently instituted a zero tolerance policy for those violating the development's parking policy, which has resulted in 87 "illegally parked" vehicles being towed from the development since October.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the long wait gun buyers must endure while state police background checks are completed, I can agree that the Maryland gun community is very unhappy and that the government can't work miracles. But beyond that, there are a lot of problems with your view ("Background check backlog," June 11). They start with your comparing this situation to a supply problem. Comparing it to the wait times at the Motor Vehicle Administration is a bit more accurate, but the equivalent would be more like the MVA asking people to wait three or four weeks to get their tags, and then telling them they can't drive the car until they arrive (there are no temporary tags in the gun world)
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