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Vehicle Administration

NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
An interesting detail emerged after a gray Chevy Cobalt hit two Baltimore police officers Wednesday and led dozens of patrol cars and a police helicopter on a chase: the state license plates affixed to the car started with "FPD" and carried a law-enforcement style, star-shaped insignia. Baltimore police said the car was driven by Alycia Marie Hoffman, 25, a Bel Air woman with a lengthy arrest record, according to court records. She has no known law enforcement background and did not own the car. Released through the Fraternal Order of Police Maryland State Lodge, the plates were issued to a retired Harford County deputy sheriff who owns the car, Maryland FOP president Rodney Bartlett said.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
Maryland's drivers should be getting the hint right about now that speeding in highway construction zones will cost them. Almost 8,800 drivers were given $40 tickets during a six-week period that began Nov. 16, when state officials started photographing vehicles exceeding the speed limit by 12 mph or more on three stretches of highway marked as work zones. "The goal is to modify driver behavior, and we hope motorists are starting to get the message as citations are being mailed out," said David Buck, a spokesman for the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Thousands of immigrants living here without legal permission will start the new year demonstrating skills in parallel parking and two-point turns in hopes of becoming licensed drivers in Maryland. Maryland joins a handful of states on Jan. 1 that issue so-called "second-tier" licenses that allow immigrants who do not have full legal documentation to drive on Maryland roads, register cars and obtain insurance. The licenses will not suffice as federal identification. Nearly 13,000 immigrants have signed up to take driving tests in the coming weeks, according to state officials.
NEWS
July 23, 1991
Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration of the Department of Transportation recently has increased fees.The most significant increasewill be the renewal of a driver's license, which is good for a four-year period.The cost will be $16.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
When Jim Maguire returned to his Pikesville home recently after a week out of town, he found a reminder from the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration to renew the registration on his car waiting in the pile of mail. "I was just going to set it aside and look at it in another month," the longtime Marylander said. "I just assumed it didn't apply to me immediately. " Luckily he didn't, because it did. Maguire, 53, was one of thousands of Marylanders who were sent notices to renew their vehicle registrations days before their tags were due to expire.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the long wait gun buyers must endure while state police background checks are completed, I can agree that the Maryland gun community is very unhappy and that the government can't work miracles. But beyond that, there are a lot of problems with your view ("Background check backlog," June 11). They start with your comparing this situation to a supply problem. Comparing it to the wait times at the Motor Vehicle Administration is a bit more accurate, but the equivalent would be more like the MVA asking people to wait three or four weeks to get their tags, and then telling them they can't drive the car until they arrive (there are no temporary tags in the gun world)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
A Hanover-based trucking company with a long history of safety violations — including a fatal crash in August — has been ordered off the road after federal regulators found it to be an "imminent hazard" to the public. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, which oversees interstate trucks and buses, said Wednesday that Gunthers Transport LLC must cease operations immediately. The regulator alleges Gunthers failed to follow traffic safety rules, ensure its drivers were qualified and keep its trucks well-maintained.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Rattling off bids in a singsong chant, auctioneer Tom Henline moved along a line of impounded vehicles yesterday followed by a swarm of bidders, each clutching a small scrap of paper imprinted with a number. "Show me the number! Show me the number!" he said after each successful bid as Pied Piper-like he led the buyers to the next car for sale near the Pulaski Highway impound lot. With Henline, a West Virginian, doing the rapid-fire hawking, Baltimore officials offered a record number of cars, minivans, and trucks, more than 900, in two auctions.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
The Motor Vehicle Administration calls it the "skills test" because it gauges many of the skills that drivers need to master before they're allowed to motor off alone in traffic. But many novices lined up nervously in their automobiles at the MVA's Glen Burnie office will tell you that there's only one part of the test that stands between them and a license: parallel parking. It is the most common reason people flunk. And it worried Darlarene Morgan, 26, of Baltimore, who practiced parallel parking 15 times before the state examiner climbed into the passenger seat of her mother's car with his clipboard one recent morning.
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