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Letter to The Aegis | February 20, 2014
Editor: The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption. About 8.7 million pounds were shipped. The recall comes in the wake of USDA's new "inspection" program that allows the meat industry to increase speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees. Traditionally, USDA has catered more to the interests and profitability of the meat industry than health and safety of American consumers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Belvedere Square, with its hip artisanal vendors, has earned its stripes as a food-lovers' destination. The area just to its south, now home to a handful of casual, capable eateries, is poised to piggyback on that success. The newest of these restaurants is Flight American Fusion Restaurant & Bar. Opened in late August, Flight is a casual spot with an interesting menu, including a wide variety of vegetarian dishes and flavors inspired by the many different cuisines found in America.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | May 4, 1994
When Elizabeth Brewster gave up meat almost 15 years ago, vegetarianism was little understood. Today, she says, research shows that more than 12.4 million Americans consider themselves vegetarian, and health concerns are the main motivation.Now Ms. Brewster has started a bimonthly, eight-page newsletter, The Practical Vegetarian. A year's subscription is $16.95; sample copy, $1. Send your name and address to The Practical Vegetarian, P.O. Box 6253, Evanston, Ill. 60204.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun and By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
When Edward Bosco and Marianne Kresevich decided to open a pizza restaurant, they didn't choose his hometown of Brooklyn, N.Y. And they didn't pick Chicago, where they were living at the time. Instead, the husband and wife moved to Baltimore and opened Verde in Canton. "We felt differentiating ourselves would be easier in Baltimore," says Bosco. Their rustic-chic restaurant, which opened in 2012, is among a handful of places that are bringing higher-quality pizza to the region. Without a pizza shop on every corner, entrepreneurs in Baltimore see room to carve out their own slice of the action, offering pies that meet a growing pizza sophistication.
NEWS
By ERIN MENDELL and ERIN MENDELL,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
The Healthy Hedonist Myra Kornfeld Simon & Schuster / 2005 / $19.95 There are people who never eat meat, those who don't eat it much and those who don't have specific restrictions but want to eat more healthfully. Recognizing a wide variety of dietary preferences, The Healthy Hedonist doesn't stop at vegetarian dishes. Many recipes are vegan or can be easily made so, but there is a section devoted to fish and chicken. The focus is on natural ingredients, most of which were available at a typical grocery store.
FEATURES
By Susanne Althoff and Susanne Althoff,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
When 18-year-old Chiao Lin of Bel Air tells her classmates she's kicked meat out of her diet, their reaction is sometimes difficult to deal with. "They're surprised or shocked," Ms. Lin said. "They're not used to it."Despite the praise given to those concerned with their health and the environment, being a vegetarian teen-ager still has a rub. Besides awkward responses, social and nutritional dilemmas creep up, such as "What do I do when I'm served meat at a friend's house?" and "What do I eat at Thanksgiving?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 12, 2007
Breaking through the thick fried crust of a vegetable samosa at Mirchi Wok takes some effort, but once you succeed, and that delicious shell cracks, a cloud of steam, gently scented with cumin, will rise out of the mix of peas and pale yellow potato within. The samosa appetizer ($3.95 for two), served with two kinds of chutney, should convince fans of the vegetarian restaurant Mango Grove that its new omnivore cousin hasn't abandoned its vegetarian roots - it's just added meat dishes to the mix. Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
When artist Mike Lippy moved to Baltimore from Brooklyn, N.Y., in the mid-1990s, he was dismayed by the dearth of vegetarian restaurants here. In the view of this avowed vegetarian, "There was no place to eat." Necessity thus became the mother of invention, and Lippy found himself on a new career path. He and his wife, Antonette, bought a brick building in Fells Point and gave the first floor over to a restaurant for other underserved, overlooked vegetarians. There aren't that many of them.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 23, 1996
LAST THURSDAY night David Gilliss, a 38-year-old Baltimore-area lawyer, devoured a steak, the first meat he had eaten in 20 years. As a sizzling New York strip was placed in front of him at Ruth's Chris Steak House, a downtown Baltimore restaurant, Gilliss picked up his knife and fork and announced, "My hands are shaking."A collection of guys in suits -- one of Gillis' friends, several of his colleagues, his older brother, Ed, and me -- had gathered to witness Gilliss' return to the ranks of the carnivores after two decades as a vegetarian.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1997
For a holiday feast like this, the turkey should give thanks.A bounty of vegetables, breads and potatoes crammed the buffet table yesterday at St. John's United Methodist Church in Baltimore's Charles Village. The dessert table offered pumpkin pie and other sweet temptations. It was Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings -- but without the bird.This was the Vegetarian Resource Group's 16th annual pre-Thanksgiving potluck dinner, a cholesterol-free affair where health food disciples and meat-is-murder moralists broke bread and marked the season of giving.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Vegetarian activists have sued in federal court two Baltimore police officers who forced them to stop leafleting at the Inner Harbor — the latest legal front after years of disputes over the constitutional rights of protesters in the city. A former Baltimore teacher and three other vegetarian activists filed the lawsuit last week in U.S. District Court over events that took place in May 2011. The lawsuit, which does not name the city nor the Police Department, alleges the officers violated their constitutional rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Red Emma's has been open for a decade - a relatively short time in a city full of history - but as one of the first organizations of its kind in Baltimore, it has the feeling of an institution. Named after early 20th century radical and Ukrainian immigrant Emma Goldman, or "Red Emma" as she was dubbed by the media, Red Emma's is a collectively owned, politically "radical" bookstore cafe - a gathering spot for like-minded thinkers but also a cafe serving well-executed, straightforward vegetarian sandwiches and snacks.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
TV host Glenn Beck and other stalwarts of the Christian right have attacked the recent blockbuster "Noah" as being "pro-animal" and unfaithful to the Bible. Well, yes and no. The film is both pro-animal and faithful to the Bible, at least to the Book of Genesis, our only source for the story of Noah. After all, Genesis 1:29 admonishes "Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit - to you it shall be for food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
The food of Ethiopia is popular for its intriguing spices, spongy bread and lack of utensils. Our neighbor to the south, Washington, D.C. , is justly celebrated for having one of the country's best Ethiopian food scenes. Here in Baltimore, our options are more limited, and mostly concentrated in the Mount Vernon area. Sheba Restaurant, which opened last year in Canton, is a welcome addition to Baltimore's list, bringing good Ethiopian food and friendly, though not always attentive, service to a new part of the city.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | February 20, 2014
Editor: The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption. About 8.7 million pounds were shipped. The recall comes in the wake of USDA's new "inspection" program that allows the meat industry to increase speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees. Traditionally, USDA has catered more to the interests and profitability of the meat industry than health and safety of American consumers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 27, 2013
Baltimore needs more bookstore cafes, and Breathe Bookstore Cafe in Hampden is a good start. The cafe opened last June, giving Baltimoreans even more reason to visit the much-loved bookshop. Owner Susan Weis-Bohlen, a cooking teacher and expert in Ayurvedic ( holistic medicine ) cooking, stocks Breathe with dishes and snacks that are gluten-free, vegan , vegetarian , raw or Ayurvedic and that include no white sugar or flour. Its mission: "To nourish your mind, body and soul.
FEATURES
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 1997
When Johey Verfaille got out of college, she thought she'd enroll in pastry school. That way, she mused, she'd always be able to lick the bowl. Deterred by the expense, she began poring over cookbooks on her own, watching cooking shows to hone her skills. When Donna Crivello opened the first Donna's eatery, Verfaille remembers entreating her, "I'll do anything, just let me work." Within six weeks she had been promoted to kitchen manager.After apprenticing in a number of local kitchens, Verfaille, 29, has become one of Baltimore's hottest young chefs, presiding over the stoves at Brewer's Art, the hip new north Mount Vernon brewpub.
FEATURES
By Lori D. Buckner and Lori D. Buckner,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
Each spring, for thousands of years, Jews have paused at Passover to commemorate the ancient Hebrews' exodus from slavery in Egypt. The Haggada, containing the Passover narrative and Seder ceremonies, reminds Jewish people the world over of their obligation to "let all who are hungry come and eat."And if the hungry are vegetarian? No problem. With creativity, substitutions and expanding product options, a vegetarian Passover menu can be traditional and satisfying.This year, "I see more things like salsa and Thai sauce that are kosher for Passover," says Debra Wasserman, a director and founder of the Vegetarian Resource Group, a local nonprofit organization that promotes meatless living.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
On any given night, when folks are sitting around wondering what they're going to do for dinner in Baltimore, the suggestion of Thai Arroy will stop the dithering. "Sure," everyone says, "let's go there. " Since its 2002 opening in Federal Hill , Thai Arroy has held remarkably steady. The menu is an ordinary one, as American Thai restaurants go. That's not a knock. The food is well-prepared, fresh and attractively presented. The sauces without exception have deep, rich flavors that suggest long simmering, or at least the know-how to make them taste that way. But the specialty at Thai Arroy is consistency, which is how a restaurant gets itself into a city's heart and winds up on personal lists of go-to places.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | June 27, 2013
What ever happened to the good old days when the worst things we had to fear on the Fourth of July were traffic jams and wayward fireworks? According to the Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline, this year's top threat is food poisoning by nasty E. coli and salmonella bugs lurking in hamburgers and hot dogs at millions of backyard barbecues.  The Hotline's advice is to grill them longer and hotter. Of course, they don't bother to mention that the high-temperature grilling that kills the bugs also forms lots of cancer-causing compounds.
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