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HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Debra Schulze, RD, LDN, weighs in on vegetables. Did you know there are more than 200 varieties of fruits and vegetables? While praised as a "good for you food," vegetables can be enjoyed in new and fun ways if you use a little imagination. Vegetable nutrition has drawn attention for the many proven health benefits. Most are low in fat and calories while dense in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals like flavonoids, carotenoids, and polyphenols.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Cereal makers have long designed eye-catching boxes to lure children to supermarket breakfast aisles. Now, grocers and produce companies are turning to Big Bird and other "Sesame Street" characters in an effort to make fruits and vegetables just as appealing. An emerging national movement that uses the Muppets to market vegetables to preschoolers got a foothold in Baltimore last week when it was adopted by two area businesses — Mars Super Markets and Savage-based East Coast Fresh, a Mars vendor and processor of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2010
Question: I am ready to choose seeds to start my garden. Can you give me some examples of resistant varieties for spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, peppers, green beans and squash? I can't wait to get my hands in the soil again! Answer: Our online publication "Recommended Vegetable Cultivars for Maryland Home Gardens" will give you plenty of suggestions for those vegetables and more at www.hgic.umd.edu under Publications. Our publications can help you plant outdoors or start vegetable transplants indoors, for example Planting Dates for Vegetable Crops in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
A family-owned produce distributor has moved from Washington to a new base in Jessup, where its 80 employees work to package and transport more than 1 million pounds of tomatoes each week. Pete Pappas & Sons Inc., founded in 1942 in Washington as a tomato distributor, started operations in August at its 120,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup, said Paul S. Pappas, general manager for the firm, which is in its fourth generation of family ownership. The larger property will allow the firm to expand into new types of produce from its tomato and berries, he said.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
Many of my hours are spent thinking and talking about the impact our Little Patuxent Speedway has (or is it Parkway?) on Town Center, Columbia, Maryland. This roadway is where there is a high risk of injury and worse, the site of the deaths of two pedestrians over the past few years. But this piece is not meant to be about speed, but rather about going green. It is still spring for the first three weeks of June, and spring is a time for trees, flowers and, best of all, a time to plant seeds.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus | February 14, 2007
How do I keep green beans bright green? They always turn an olive color on me. The key to cooking green beans - really, to cooking most green vegetables - is to cook them in three stages: blanch them, shock them, saute them. This is my preferred method for dealing with green beans, broccoli, asparagus and sugar snap peas. First, bring a large pot of water to boil. The more water you use, the less it will cool down when you add the vegetables, and the quicker it will come back to a boil.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1995
Q: Sometimes I see eggplant and tomatoes referred to as fruits. I thought they were vegetables. Can you explain?A: It is confusing to understand what separates a fruit from a vegetable. The fruit is the part of a flowering plant that develops from the ovaryand contains the seeds. This includes sweet fleshy fruits and some vegetables like zucchini, eggplant, cucumber, tomatoes, sweet peppers and nuts. Vegetables are herbaceous plants cultivated for food. Different parts of the vegetables are eaten.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | November 22, 2006
Regular turkey sandwiches are one of the best dividends of Thanksgiving, but sometimes something different appeals. The roasty flavors of vegetables sizzled on the grill prove irresistible in this easy-to-prepare main-dish sandwich. Your gas grill makes cooking fast and simple. Brushing the vegetables with a little oil helps provide beautiful grill marks; it's important to grill them for at least three minutes per side -No poking! No peeking! - to get the appealing stripes. The grilled vegetables have so much flavor that only 4 ounces or so of turkey easily serves two. Even the dedicated carnivore won't miss the meat.
NEWS
By Christine Dobmeier, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Christine Dobmeier, RD CSR LDN, weighs in on the 1812 diet. Baltimore is embarking on the bicentennial celebration of the War of 1812. With the focus on history with the upcoming events around town, it's interesting to think about how people in 1812 lived their everyday lives, including what they ate. Were their diets similar to ours or drastically different?
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 14, 2000
Item: Wyler's Shakers Instant Bouillon and Seasoning * Cost: About $3 * Preparation time: Just sprinkle on meat, vegetables, rice and other foods * Review: Like most bouillon, Wyler's new seasoning mixes are high in sodium and you definitely taste it. That's not to say they're bad. But I recommend ignoring the measurements on the package and shaking the seasoning out slowly, according to your taste. I tried the Southwest Chicken and Herb and the Beef and French Onion flavors on rice and vegetables as Wyler's suggests.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 28, 2014
Farmers Market Week begins Aug. 3, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and an independent public health organization wants consumers to remember a few things about food safety. Uncooked produce is twice as likely to make you sick than meat because fruits and vegetables can attract bacteria from the soil or water where it's grown, notes NSF International , citing data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here are some tips from the group and from foodsafety.gov , a site maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: +Look for produce that isn't bruised or damaged.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Fe Reyes-Dollete and Roldolfo Dollete's patio container garden grew out of desperation. For 30 years the couple, who are both physicians, tried to grow flowers and vegetables on their suburban property, only to watch deer consume all they grew. Reyes-Dollete recalls one year she managed to grow a particularly beautiful daylily. She went to get her camera to take a picture of it, and when she returned it was gone, eaten by a deer she saw standing in the yard. The couple decided to move their garden to their patio.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
For as long as anyone can remember, wild orchids have rewarded sharp-eyed hikers in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains with pink, yellow and white blooms peeping from the forest floor. But these "secret beauties," as one researcher dubbed them, are vanishing at an alarming rate, likely devoured by a horde of deer feeding on every leaf and shoot they can reach, according to a new study. "Deer are like lawnmowers when they get going in a forest," said J. Mel Poole, the superintendent of Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Grace Elizabeth Crowder, a homemaker who canned vegetables from her farm, died of stroke complications Tuesday at Providence Place Assisted Living in Chambersburg, Pa. The Mount Airy resident was 86. Born Grace Elizabeth Dieter in Baltimore, she was raised in East Baltimore and attended city public schools through the sixth grade. As a young woman, she worked at Montgomery Ward on Washington Boulevard. Family members said that her mother died of cancer when she was 9 and that her father was frequently absent.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
If you were a 19th-century Frenchman, you would likely be served three courses of asparagus during your prenuptial dinner. The vegetable with the suggestive shape, writes Helen Yoest in "Plants with Benefits," was thought to stir amorous feeling. Little did the French know then, confides Yoest, the author of a book on aphrodisiac plants, but asparagus is rich in folic acid, which boosts histamine production — which helps on wedding nights. The benefits of asparagus, she writes, "seem to be in that gray area between actual aphrodisiac effects and the power of suggestion.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Baltimore City plans to help corner stores in West Baltimore stock healthier fare, and get kids and their parents interested in buying it, as part of an effort to reduce childhood obesity. Though on the decline among young children nationally, obesity remains a major problem in U.S. cities such as Baltimore, where about a quarter of students are excessively overweight and potentially at risk for lifelong health problems. Officials at the Baltimore City Health Department have identified limited access to low-cost and appealing healthy food as a barrier to reducing obesity and have worked to reduce the number of "food deserts" in low-income neighborhoods through programs such as a virtual supermarket that allows participants in public housing and elsewhere to order healthy food online for delivery.
NEWS
By Joe Gray. and Joe Gray.,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 4, 2007
Hamburger Helper, that Betty Crocker standard of the '70s, fascinated me as a child. What was it? How did it help? When faced with some ground turkey for dinner, and tired of my usual turkey burgers, I decided the turkey would be easier to cook up in a skillet with a little help. To me, that meant whatever vegetables I had on hand: some onions and a couple of zucchini. After I threw in a red bell pepper for color, my dish was nearly done. You can adapt the idea to whatever vegetables you have in the refrigerator.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Looking through my calendar of national observances, it appears that October is turning into "food month," beginning with World Vegetarian Day and World Day for Farm Animals Oct. 1-2, continuing with National School Lunch Week, Oct. 14-18 and World Food Day on Oct. 16, and culminating with Food Day, Oct. 24. World Day for Farm Animals Day (www.WFAD.org), on Oct. 2, is perhaps the most dramatic of these. It celebrates the lives, exposes the abuses, and memorializes the slaughter of billions of sentient animals raised for food.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The owner of a College Park waste collection business pleaded guilty Monday to transporting stolen property as part of a scheme to steal waste vegetable oil, the U.S. attorney's office announced. Ahmad Qaabid Abdul-Rahim, 37, admitted in a plea agreement entered in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to receiving nearly $99,000 for selling more than 94,000 gallons of stolen waste vegetable oil during a nine-month period last year. Abdul-Rahim, who according to the plea agreement once played football at the University of Maryland, acknowledged that he and a friend first stole waste vegetable oil in 2010 from restaurants in Prince George's County, Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia.
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