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By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2001
Back when disco raged through the nation's strobe-lighted, mirror-balled dancehalls, Esther Phillips sang, "What a difference a day makes, 24 little hours." For Mike Veeck, it took 22 years. Thursday night, on the anniversary of baseball's biggest marketing blunder, the promoter finally apologized for Disco Demolition Night. Cue Love's Theme. Veeck, now a marketing consultant for the Florida Marlins, asked Harry Wayne Casey, better known as KC of KC and the Sunshine Band, to accept his apology on behalf of the entire disco world.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Had Bill Veeck had his way, Jackie Robinson would not have been pioneer, hero, inspiration. That mantle would belong to others. Four years before Robinson broke baseball's color line in 1947, Veeck tried to buy the floundering Philadelphia Phillies. His plan? Stock the team on the cheap with top players from the Negro leagues, fill the park and turn the game on its segregated ear. Had baseball's maverick pulled that off, the game today would be honoring a different cache of groundbreakers such as Roy Campanella, Satchel Paige and Monte Irvin.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
The jackals are at the door. An upstart team down the road in a dump of a ballpark with not a sports bar in sight is keeping pace at the turnstiles. Baltimore's team is doing well in the standings, but not in the stands, where empty green seats swallow up Tejada home runs. Through Monday, the Orioles and Nationals were dead center in Major League Baseball home attendance figures. Baltimore was 14th, with 31,006 customers a night. Washington was 15th, with 30,672 fannies in the seats. The Orioles lost their magnetism the first game of the year - traditionally a day of renewal and refrigerator magnets - when sponsor Southwest Airlines flew the coop.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
Jim Delsing, 80, an outstanding defensive outfielder who played 10 seasons in the American League but was remembered mostly for his role in baseball's most famous stunt, died of complications from cancer Thursday at his home in Chesterfield, Mo. On Aug. 19, 1951, the last-place St. Louis Browns were playing the Detroit Tigers in the second game of a doubleheader at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. Bill Veeck, the Browns' owner, was about to seal his reputation as a master showman, and Mr. Delsing was about to become the answer to a baseball trivia question.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 12, 1994
Baseball is in the position it is because the man in charge, Bud Selig, refused to listen to a mere sportswriter. For right now, the story is a bit ahead of itself.The setting was Baltimore. An occasion in the late 1960s, a summer night, when what was supposed to be a private meeting was inadvertently interrupted by the chance appearance of a newspaper reporter. Selig, then on the outside looking in at a game he now has a role in helping to destroy, and the late Bill Veeck, at the time an exiled club owner, were huddled in a conversation they didn't want others to know about.
SPORTS
April 10, 1991
Minnie Minoso's bid to play professional baseball in a sixth decade was blocked yesterday when his contract with the Miami Miracle of the Florida State League was rejected by the commissioner's office.Minoso, 68, who last played in 1980, when he appeared in two games with the Chicago White Sox, had been working out at the White Sox's spring training complex in Sarasota, Fla. He was scheduled to appear as a designated hitter or pinch hitter in Saturday night's game between Miami and the Fort Lauderdale Yankees.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2001
At some point this season, manager Ron Kittle of the Schaumburg Flyers will walk to the mound to pull his starting pitcher. He'll look to the bullpen and bring in ... well, he'll bring in whichever reliever the fans tell him to bring in. In a promotion reminiscent of an old Bill Veeck stunt, the independent Northern League baseball team said last month that it will occasionally interrupt games to seek fans' advice on pinch hitters, relief pitchers and...
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
SARASOTA, Fla. -- He's only a year out of college, at least two seasons away from the Nameless Stadium at Camden Yards, and an indelible entry in Ben McDonald's memory bank that won't go away.But yesterday, during an otherwise long, dreary and dull workout, Paul Carey was big news in the Orioles' spring training camp.Carey is a 6-foot-4, 230-pound lefthanded power hitter from Stanford University. He still can be seen occasionally on an ESPN highlight film that captures his game-winning, 10th-inning grand slam off McDonald that enabled Stanford to continue on and eventually win the 1987 College World Series.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1992
It was a curveball thrown by a law firm that denied Rudie Schaffer the opportunity to become the first general manager of the major-league Baltimore Orioles. He had come, or so it was believed, in the deal with the St. Louis Browns. The understanding was he'd be in charge of the new franchise.But suddenly the attorneys representing owner Clarence Miles found a way to work their way out of what had been agreed upon. He wasn't going to be the general manager; a position that went to Arthur Ehlers, a home-grown baseball executive who left the Philadelphia A's and was named to the position that had been earlier promised to Schaffer.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
Jim Delsing, 80, an outstanding defensive outfielder who played 10 seasons in the American League but was remembered mostly for his role in baseball's most famous stunt, died of complications from cancer Thursday at his home in Chesterfield, Mo. On Aug. 19, 1951, the last-place St. Louis Browns were playing the Detroit Tigers in the second game of a doubleheader at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. Bill Veeck, the Browns' owner, was about to seal his reputation as a master showman, and Mr. Delsing was about to become the answer to a baseball trivia question.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
The jackals are at the door. An upstart team down the road in a dump of a ballpark with not a sports bar in sight is keeping pace at the turnstiles. Baltimore's team is doing well in the standings, but not in the stands, where empty green seats swallow up Tejada home runs. Through Monday, the Orioles and Nationals were dead center in Major League Baseball home attendance figures. Baltimore was 14th, with 31,006 customers a night. Washington was 15th, with 30,672 fannies in the seats. The Orioles lost their magnetism the first game of the year - traditionally a day of renewal and refrigerator magnets - when sponsor Southwest Airlines flew the coop.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2001
Back when disco raged through the nation's strobe-lighted, mirror-balled dancehalls, Esther Phillips sang, "What a difference a day makes, 24 little hours." For Mike Veeck, it took 22 years. Thursday night, on the anniversary of baseball's biggest marketing blunder, the promoter finally apologized for Disco Demolition Night. Cue Love's Theme. Veeck, now a marketing consultant for the Florida Marlins, asked Harry Wayne Casey, better known as KC of KC and the Sunshine Band, to accept his apology on behalf of the entire disco world.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2001
At some point this season, manager Ron Kittle of the Schaumburg Flyers will walk to the mound to pull his starting pitcher. He'll look to the bullpen and bring in ... well, he'll bring in whichever reliever the fans tell him to bring in. In a promotion reminiscent of an old Bill Veeck stunt, the independent Northern League baseball team said last month that it will occasionally interrupt games to seek fans' advice on pinch hitters, relief pitchers and...
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 12, 1994
Baseball is in the position it is because the man in charge, Bud Selig, refused to listen to a mere sportswriter. For right now, the story is a bit ahead of itself.The setting was Baltimore. An occasion in the late 1960s, a summer night, when what was supposed to be a private meeting was inadvertently interrupted by the chance appearance of a newspaper reporter. Selig, then on the outside looking in at a game he now has a role in helping to destroy, and the late Bill Veeck, at the time an exiled club owner, were huddled in a conversation they didn't want others to know about.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 29, 1994
The quality of mercy in a true baseball fan is strained if, as it falleth as the gentle rain from heaven upon Cleveland, he or she feels anything but joy, appreciation and goodwill for what's happening with the Indians these days.It has been far too long since the Tribe, in a grand ball town, made any noise on the diamond front. Far too long. Why, it has been 35 years since Cleveland even contended, finishing second to the White Sox in 1959, five games back.Since last it achieved a better than .500 record in 1986, the team has lost 138 more games than it has won. Since the start of division play 25 years ago in 1969, the beloved Featherheads are a mere 362 games below the break-even mark.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 2, 1994
Ed "The Only" Nolan was quite a pitcher in his day, once starting 38 ballgames during a season and completing 37 of them. One day, though, he missed a game for what he thought was a perfectly good reason, and he got fired. Fired.Baseball being what it was at the time, which was before the turn of the century, Nolan had no recourse. He couldn't sign and play elsewhere (due to collusive owners) and only public clamor returned him to his National League team.Unfortunately for the players, there was no appeal process open to them as the game for its first 80 years was conducted with all the style and grace of the Spanish Inquisition, with not too many self-respecting people caring much.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 29, 1994
The quality of mercy in a true baseball fan is strained if, as it falleth as the gentle rain from heaven upon Cleveland, he or she feels anything but joy, appreciation and goodwill for what's happening with the Indians these days.It has been far too long since the Tribe, in a grand ball town, made any noise on the diamond front. Far too long. Why, it has been 35 years since Cleveland even contended, finishing second to the White Sox in 1959, five games back.Since last it achieved a better than .500 record in 1986, the team has lost 138 more games than it has won. Since the start of division play 25 years ago in 1969, the beloved Featherheads are a mere 362 games below the break-even mark.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 2, 1994
Ed "The Only" Nolan was quite a pitcher in his day, once starting 38 ballgames during a season and completing 37 of them. One day, though, he missed a game for what he thought was a perfectly good reason, and he got fired. Fired.Baseball being what it was at the time, which was before the turn of the century, Nolan had no recourse. He couldn't sign and play elsewhere (due to collusive owners) and only public clamor returned him to his National League team.Unfortunately for the players, there was no appeal process open to them as the game for its first 80 years was conducted with all the style and grace of the Spanish Inquisition, with not too many self-respecting people caring much.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1992
It was a curveball thrown by a law firm that denied Rudie Schaffer the opportunity to become the first general manager of the major-league Baltimore Orioles. He had come, or so it was believed, in the deal with the St. Louis Browns. The understanding was he'd be in charge of the new franchise.But suddenly the attorneys representing owner Clarence Miles found a way to work their way out of what had been agreed upon. He wasn't going to be the general manager; a position that went to Arthur Ehlers, a home-grown baseball executive who left the Philadelphia A's and was named to the position that had been earlier promised to Schaffer.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 18, 1991
The photograph is one of baseball's Rockwells, its characters etched into memory: the umpire, Ed Hurley, squatting to get a better look at a very small strike zone. Detroit Tigers catcher Bob Swift, on his knees behind home plate, perhaps a smile cracking through his mask. And Eddie Gaedel, crouching at bat for the St. Louis Browns, his serious expression belying perhaps the most hysterical moment in major-league history.It happened 40 years ago tomorrow."It transcended baseball. Even people who didn't know anything about the game heard about it," Mary-Frances Veeck, the widow of Bill Veeck, who owned the Browns at the time, said last week from her home in Chicago.
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