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By Nancy Rivera Brooks and Nancy Rivera Brooks,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- The Vector is Jerry Wiegert's dream car: It is his fighter plane without wings, his Rolex with wheels.Fans of the Vector -- the term is defined in promotional literature as "a quantity with force, velocity and direction in space" -- see one of the fastest, safest street cars ever designed.Skeptics look at the sleek, dark prototype for the $250,000 Vector and see a 12-year-old automobile that has logged more than 300,000 miles and three crashes. They see 14 years of hype and the specters of failed carmakers John DeLorean, Malcolm Bricklin and Preston Tucker.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 21, 2007
Your company is late filing financial disclosures, under investigation for stock-option irregularities, about to be ejected from Nasdaq and getting its pants sued off by shareholders. Want to get away? Now you can, thanks to the willingness of "private equity" funds to gather even dysfunctional public corporations into their unfathomable bosoms. SafeNet Inc., a Belcamp Web-security outfit that faces accounting, options and lawsuit problems, is going private. PHH Corp., which owns a Hunt Valley fleet-management operation and hasn't filed financial statements for 2006, looks like it'll be sold to General Electric and Blackstone Group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Waka Tsunoda and Waka Tsunoda,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
"Vector," by Robin Cook. Putnam. $24.95.Robin Cook has written plenty of scary medical thrillers, but his latest, "Vector," is probably the scariest.That's because it deals with a real and imminent danger to everyone -- biological terrorism.As the novel opens, Yuri Davydov, a disgruntled New York taxi driver, and a couple of hate-filled members of a violent far-right organization are plotting to spray the Big Apple with deadly anthrax bacterium and botulism toxin.Yuri, who had been a technician in a Russian bioweapons factory, manufactures inhalational anthrax in his basement laboratory.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | March 9, 2007
WILMINGTON, Del. -- SafeNet Inc., the Harford County technology company under federal investigation, has been sued by a shareholder who charged that some directors agreed to sell the company to a private equity firm to avoid potential liabilities from backdating of stock options. SafeNet, a maker of chips and software that encrypt data on computer networks, agreed to be acquired by Vector Capital Corp. for $634 million, or $28.75 a share, 1.6 percent higher than the stock's closing price last Friday.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
Pressing into new territory, toolmaker Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it has bought a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., designer and marketer of jump-starters and similar consumer products for $160 million. Towson-based Black & Decker said the privately owned Vector Products Inc. complements its line of power tools, kitchen appliances and other household items. Vector's products - which include vehicle battery chargers, power inverters and rechargeable spotlights - represent Black & Decker's first significant foray into the consumer automotive and marine markets.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | March 9, 2007
WILMINGTON, Del. -- SafeNet Inc., the Harford County technology company under federal investigation, has been sued by a shareholder who charged that some directors agreed to sell the company to a private equity firm to avoid potential liabilities from backdating of stock options. SafeNet, a maker of chips and software that encrypt data on computer networks, agreed to be acquired by Vector Capital Corp. for $634 million, or $28.75 a share, 1.6 percent higher than the stock's closing price last Friday.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
Analysts said yesterday that a bid by a California private equity firm to buy Harford County technology company SafeNet Inc. is too low, and one of the Belcamp company's largest investors said they were "very disappointed" with the offer. SafeNet, which has been under federal investigation for its stock options awards, said Monday that it had agreed to be acquired by Vector Capital of San Francisco for $28.75 a share, making the deal worth about $634 million. The company's board has unanimously approved the acquisition, but the deal requires that 78 percent of SafeNet shares be tendered.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 21, 2007
Your company is late filing financial disclosures, under investigation for stock-option irregularities, about to be ejected from Nasdaq and getting its pants sued off by shareholders. Want to get away? Now you can, thanks to the willingness of "private equity" funds to gather even dysfunctional public corporations into their unfathomable bosoms. SafeNet Inc., a Belcamp Web-security outfit that faces accounting, options and lawsuit problems, is going private. PHH Corp., which owns a Hunt Valley fleet-management operation and hasn't filed financial statements for 2006, looks like it'll be sold to General Electric and Blackstone Group.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowe and Liz Bowe,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
NASA put out a "For Sale" sign at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday and thousands of companies and entrepreneurs showed up to browse over more than 250 high-tech products.Call it a yard sale. Except don't think of used toasters. This is technology that has been used in a space shuttle or a fighter plane, but has a second life as another product.The Technology 2002 conference, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, shows off the wares of federal agencies and private companies that have developed products they hope to sell or license for use in new products.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
FREDERICK -- Dressed in thick rubber gloves, surgical garb and a helmet that fed him microbe-free air, Capt. Neal E. Woollen spent workday afternoons over the past two months standing in a clearing in an African forest, dissecting gazelles, lizards, monkeys, mongooses and jackals.The Army veterinarian was part of an international team of scientists sent to the city of Kikwit, in central Zaire, after an outbreak of the lethal Ebola virus. That outbreak has infected 296 people and killed 233 -- a mortality rate of almost 80 percent.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
Analysts said yesterday that a bid by a California private equity firm to buy Harford County technology company SafeNet Inc. is too low, and one of the Belcamp company's largest investors said they were "very disappointed" with the offer. SafeNet, which has been under federal investigation for its stock options awards, said Monday that it had agreed to be acquired by Vector Capital of San Francisco for $28.75 a share, making the deal worth about $634 million. The company's board has unanimously approved the acquisition, but the deal requires that 78 percent of SafeNet shares be tendered.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Stacey Hirsh and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTERS | March 6, 2007
SafeNet Inc., the Harford County technology company under federal investigation for its stock option grants, said yesterday that it has agreed to be acquired by a San Francisco private equity firm for about $634 million. Vector Capital will acquire all of SafeNet's outstanding shares for $28.75 per share - a 12 percent premium over the company's average closing share price for the 30 trading days that ended Friday. Shares of SafeNet closed up 5 cents yesterday at $28.35. A sale would end the Belcamp company's tenure in the public arena, where its shares have been subject to the ups and downs of the volatile technology sector.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
Pressing into new territory, toolmaker Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it has bought a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., designer and marketer of jump-starters and similar consumer products for $160 million. Towson-based Black & Decker said the privately owned Vector Products Inc. complements its line of power tools, kitchen appliances and other household items. Vector's products - which include vehicle battery chargers, power inverters and rechargeable spotlights - represent Black & Decker's first significant foray into the consumer automotive and marine markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Waka Tsunoda and Waka Tsunoda,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
"Vector," by Robin Cook. Putnam. $24.95.Robin Cook has written plenty of scary medical thrillers, but his latest, "Vector," is probably the scariest.That's because it deals with a real and imminent danger to everyone -- biological terrorism.As the novel opens, Yuri Davydov, a disgruntled New York taxi driver, and a couple of hate-filled members of a violent far-right organization are plotting to spray the Big Apple with deadly anthrax bacterium and botulism toxin.Yuri, who had been a technician in a Russian bioweapons factory, manufactures inhalational anthrax in his basement laboratory.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
FREDERICK -- Dressed in thick rubber gloves, surgical garb and a helmet that fed him microbe-free air, Capt. Neal E. Woollen spent workday afternoons over the past two months standing in a clearing in an African forest, dissecting gazelles, lizards, monkeys, mongooses and jackals.The Army veterinarian was part of an international team of scientists sent to the city of Kikwit, in central Zaire, after an outbreak of the lethal Ebola virus. That outbreak has infected 296 people and killed 233 -- a mortality rate of almost 80 percent.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowe and Liz Bowe,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
NASA put out a "For Sale" sign at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday and thousands of companies and entrepreneurs showed up to browse over more than 250 high-tech products.Call it a yard sale. Except don't think of used toasters. This is technology that has been used in a space shuttle or a fighter plane, but has a second life as another product.The Technology 2002 conference, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, shows off the wares of federal agencies and private companies that have developed products they hope to sell or license for use in new products.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Stacey Hirsh and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTERS | March 6, 2007
SafeNet Inc., the Harford County technology company under federal investigation for its stock option grants, said yesterday that it has agreed to be acquired by a San Francisco private equity firm for about $634 million. Vector Capital will acquire all of SafeNet's outstanding shares for $28.75 per share - a 12 percent premium over the company's average closing share price for the 30 trading days that ended Friday. Shares of SafeNet closed up 5 cents yesterday at $28.35. A sale would end the Belcamp company's tenure in the public arena, where its shares have been subject to the ups and downs of the volatile technology sector.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | March 13, 2007
Faced with a federal investigation into its stock options practices and the need to restate years of financial results, SafeNet Inc. contacted 35 potential buyers before agreeing to be bought by San Francisco private equity firm Vector Capital, the Harford County company disclosed in a document filed late yesterday with the SEC. Seventeen of those signed confidentiality agreements and conducted due diligence, and three - including Vector Capital -...
BUSINESS
By Nancy Rivera Brooks and Nancy Rivera Brooks,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- The Vector is Jerry Wiegert's dream car: It is his fighter plane without wings, his Rolex with wheels.Fans of the Vector -- the term is defined in promotional literature as "a quantity with force, velocity and direction in space" -- see one of the fastest, safest street cars ever designed.Skeptics look at the sleek, dark prototype for the $250,000 Vector and see a 12-year-old automobile that has logged more than 300,000 miles and three crashes. They see 14 years of hype and the specters of failed carmakers John DeLorean, Malcolm Bricklin and Preston Tucker.
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