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FEATURES
June 19, 1991
The next time you want to grill something a little a different, but very simple and delicious, try sesame veal Kebabs.The marinated strips are threaded onto skewers and cooked just until done, which takes only four to five minutes.Serve the Kebabs with easy accompaniments such as a colorful vegetable medley or a rice and snow pea salad.The recipe is from the National Live Stock and Meat Board.Sesame Veal Kebabs1 pound veal cutlets, cut 1/4 -inch thick1/3 cup dry white wine2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onion2 teaspoons sesame oil1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger2 garlic cloves, minced1/4 teaspoon saltCut veal cutlets into one-inch wide strips.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
I had one of those soul-satisfying, I-love-Baltimore nights a few Saturdays back at Cafe Gia Ristorante, a colorful, cheerful and satisfying Italian restaurant on the corner of High Street and Eastern Avenue. We showed up for early dinner reservations and were whisked right upstairs to the narrow second-floor balcony, which was pretty darn magical on this particular night. The view from there isn't spectacular, but it's captivating, a mix of old and new. Across the street, you can see diners on the balcony at Dalesio's, and further back, the high- and medium-rise luxury apartment buildings of the Harbor East development.
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NEWS
January 16, 2000
Food writer Frank Browning gives the apple an honorable place in culinary history as he introduces the recipe for savory Iranian Veal-Stuffed Apples in "An Apple Harvest" (Ten Speed Press, $17.95), the cookbook he co-authored with Sharon Silva. "Long before our European ancestors knew that there was more to a good meal than quarreling over flame-licked bear bones just beyond the cave door," he writes, "the Persians were sitting down to sumptuous feasts built around fruits and vegetables plucked from their own elaborate household gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
Waterfront Kitchen opens on Friday, Oct. 28, in the Living Classroom's Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Museum in Fells Point. The new restaurant, which seats 75 inside and 100 outside on a waterside promenade, is owned by Charles Nabit and Michael Klein. Levi Briggs has been named chef de cuisine. Jerry Pelligrino is credited with the menu's creation. On the eve of the restaurant's opening, his menu was still being tweaked, said Waterfront Kitchen's general manager Jamie Heffron. But as it stood on Thursday evening, the menu included eight appetizers and six principal plates.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | August 9, 2006
Veal can be a pricey item in the meat case, but occasionally you can find it on sale. For such a time, here's an easy pasta recipe that stretches a pound of veal to feed four. The tomato sauce mixes flavors from tangy capers and shredded basil. The dish is inspired by a recipe from In Three Easy Steps: Fabulous Food Without the Fuss, by chef Conrad Gallagher. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Linguine With Veal, Capers and Tomatoes Serves 4 -- Total time: 40 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pound veal scaloppine, cut in strips 1/2 teaspoon salt (divided use)
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,Knight Ridder News Service | April 5, 1992
A warm and inviting stew is usually not on a list of quick and easy dinners. Sauteed veal with leeks, however, is simple, delicious and will take just minutes to prepare.Stew veal is usually sold already cut into cubes. Try to buy cubes that are about 1 inch square and don't have a lot of gristle. These will cook more evenly and remain juicier than smaller pieces. The dish freezes very well; if you have time, double the recipe and save half for an emergency dinner.The recipe calls for a bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
As early morning sun bathes the sidewalks in Charles Village, it seems a perfect day to chill out, to contemplate life or, perhaps, to protest the sale of veal. Kerron Ramnath is already sitting in his green plastic chair outside Eddie's Market on St. Paul Street. For several days he has been collecting signatures he hopes will lead the store to stop offering veal. Which, in turn, will end the cruel treatment of veal calves. The poster on his backpack reads "Say No To Veal." Photos of caged, miserable creatures stare reproachfully at cheerful passers-by.
FEATURES
September 26, 1990
Weeknight meals for busy families have three requirements: easy, quick and good tasting.But do you sometimes yearn for classic dishes, which often require lengthy preparation and long cooking?Some of those favorites can be streamlined for weeknight dining. Cassoulet, for example. This hearty bean stew inspired by the cooking of southwestern France is traditionally made with white beans, seasonings and one or more meats which cook long and slow.Our Quick Veal Cassoulet features flavors and ingredients reminiscent of the traditional dish, but it's prepared in about 30 minutes.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 15, 1992
Getting a meal on the table in 30 minutes or less is no strange new phenomenon of the 1990s.Cookbook publishers have been churning out quick cookbooks on a regular basis during the past decade. But not all are created equal. Some of these supposed quick cook menus make your kitchen look like the aftermath of a tornado; it takes more time to clean up the mess than it takes to prepare the meal.Whether you are judging the quick-cook menu in a cookbook or developing one on your own, remember one basic: Keep it simple.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,EVENING SUN STAFF CoChin, THE SUN Capriccio THE SUNDAY SUN | December 29, 1990
Thompson's Sea Girt HouseThompson's Sea Girt House 5919 York Road, 435-1800. This popular establishment has been part of Baltimore's restaurant scene for more than 100 years. There are many traditional dishes on the menu, as well as touches of Spanish fare, which reflect the change in ownership several years ago. I found the Onion Soup a la Anciana unusual and quite good with its light base and sprinkling of Parmesan cheese. Some of the other offerings were not as flavorful. The $13.95 four-course dinner special, which is offered weeknights, draws many diners.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
Apples for Jam By Tessa Kiros Kitchen Memories By Anne Snape Parsons and Alexandra Greeley Capital Books News / 2007 / $24 This book takes the cooking memories concept on a global tour, offering a collection of family recipes from 25 countries. Some of the personal notes that accompany the recipes are truly interesting tales. The introduction to the Cambodian dish Chicken Amok is almost startling, and not just because the woman who contributes it declares, "I hate cooking." Phnom Penh native Montha C. Prom was "associated with the former Cambodian royal family" before she and her husband "escaped the killing fields into Thailand.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 24, 2006
Irish Charities of Maryland, which also sponsors the Baltimore Irish Festival at Timonium Fairgrounds, recently held a "What's in Your Guinness?" recipe contest to find the tastiest ways to use the Irish beer Guinness in food. Six restaurants entered; this hearty dish from Jeffrey Smith, chef/owner and operator of the Chameleon Cafe in Lauraville, won top honors. BRAISED SHORT RIBS WITH VEAL STOCK GUINNESS REDUCTION Serves 6 to 7 1/2 cup flour salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 2 pounds beef short ribs 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 pound onions, chopped 8 ounces carrots, chopped 3 cups veal stock 4 garlic cloves 1 bay leaf 4 peppercorns 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 can Guinness beer 1/4 cup each, diced: turnips, carrots, rutabaga, parsnips Season flour with salt and pepper.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | December 4, 2006
This is another story about the old dog who lives in my house and clings to life for the sole purpose of driving me crazy. Here's the new thing the dog is doing now: faking an eating disorder. It began a few months ago, when the dog didn't seem to have his usual appetite and my wife became concerned. "Maybe his teeth are bothering him," she said. "He is 14 years old." There's nothing wrong with the dog's teeth, I told her. This is all an act. Don't fall for this. This is exactly what he wants.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | October 1, 2006
Slow-cooked meals are a luxury in our fast-paced world. Yet you can still whip up a tasty stew by using quick- cooking meats and altering the cooking method. This veal and tomato stew captures the light, simple flavors of Tuscany. Using quick-cooking veal cutlets, the one-dish meal captures the flavors and textures of a stew without taking a lot of time. TUSCAN VEAL AND TOMATO STEW Makes 2 servings 1/4 cup flour 1 1/2 teaspoons dried rosemary, divided use Salt and freshly ground black pepper 3/4 pound veal cutlets 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided use 1/2 pound red potatoes, cut into 1-inch pieces 1/2 small onion sliced ( 1/2 cup)
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | August 9, 2006
Veal can be a pricey item in the meat case, but occasionally you can find it on sale. For such a time, here's an easy pasta recipe that stretches a pound of veal to feed four. The tomato sauce mixes flavors from tangy capers and shredded basil. The dish is inspired by a recipe from In Three Easy Steps: Fabulous Food Without the Fuss, by chef Conrad Gallagher. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Linguine With Veal, Capers and Tomatoes Serves 4 -- Total time: 40 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pound veal scaloppine, cut in strips 1/2 teaspoon salt (divided use)
SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 21, 2004
The Ravens signed Marques Ogden and Demetrin Veal to the practice squad today while releasing linebacker Brandon Barnes, defensive lineman David Upchurch and center Lenny Vandermade. Ogden, 6-foot-5, 300-pound tackle out of Howard, is the brother of All-Pro tackle Jonathan Ogden. Veal was originally drafted by the Falcons in the seventh round of the 2003 draft. In other news, former Raven Michael McCrary will be inducted into the team's Ring of Honor at halftime of the Oct. 4 against the Kansas City Chiefs Originally published September 21, 2004, 6:04 PM EDT
FEATURES
October 25, 1992
REVVED UP ABOUT RACINGEditor:I'd like your readers to know that there was once more to stock car racing ["Daze of Thunder," Aug. 2] besides the roar of the engines, partying and idolizing a few drivers who risk their lives for money.[One time] I was traveling to Florida and stopped overnight in Charlotte, N.C. I was having trouble with a manifold gasket. In the morning while I was eating breakfast I noticed Dick Rathman, who was driving in the Charlotte 500 that day. He was racing the same kind of car I was driving.
SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 21, 2004
The Ravens signed Marques Ogden and Demetrin Veal to the practice squad today while releasing linebacker Brandon Barnes, defensive lineman David Upchurch and center Lenny Vandermade. Ogden, 6-foot-5, 300-pound tackle out of Howard, is the brother of All-Pro tackle Jonathan Ogden. Veal was originally drafted by the Falcons in the seventh round of the 2003 draft. In other news, former Raven Michael McCrary will be inducted into the team's Ring of Honor at halftime of the Oct. 4 against the Kansas City Chiefs Originally published September 21, 2004, 6:04 PM EDT
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 5, 2004
If anyone has any doubt that Little Italy is keeping up with the times, consider the bread at Ciao Bella, a nice little restaurant steeped in neighborhood tradition. This is simply a spectacular loaf, crisp-crusted and fresh, with plenty of flavor -- a far cry from the tasteless but mildly enjoyable fluff that used to grace every restaurant table in Little Italy. Bravissimo! We didn't end up cheering about everything, though. We had some good food, but we also had some not-so-good food.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
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