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NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | November 15, 2006
The Town Theatre, the former west-side vaudeville house that will be Everyman Theatre's new home, closed in 1990 - coincidentally, the year Everyman was founded. But the Town had a long, colorful history before that. Originally called the Empire, the theater was designed by Otto Simonson of Baltimore and W.H. McElfatrick of New York. It opened on Christmas Day in 1911, with seating for more than 2,200 on several levels, as well as pool parlors, a soda fountain and a rathskeller, as Robert Kirk Headley Jr. recounted in his 1974 book, Exit: A History of Movies in Baltimore.
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NEWS
June 14, 2004
EVER WISH your dog could fetch something more useful than a moldy old chew toy? Like say, a snack from the fridge, or sweater from the chair? Or wouldn't it be great, when surprise guests turn up, if Fido could be instructed to use that big, fluffy tail to give the furniture a quick dusting - maybe clear cobwebs out of some corners? Looks like there's hope for house pets to begin pulling their weight. In fact, lazy, old Bowser might have been holding out on us. There's some chance the dog not only can eat your homework, but also do it for you. Old assumptions about the limits of canine intelligence are being reconsidered because of the skills of Rico, a German border collie with a vocabulary of 200 words who can find and match an unfamiliar object with a term he's never heard before.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2004
Eats Sushi King -- a longtime Columbia favorite -- is tucked next to a Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration and offers tasty food and an exceptionally pleasant ambience, page 18 Trips Just in time for Thanksgiving shopping, take a road trip out to the numerous markets in York County, page 28 Scene Notre Maison, a Charles Village teahouse and poetry cafe, celebrates its second anniversary Saturday. It offers events ranging from open-mike nights to game nights to philosophical "open chats."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | December 2, 1994
Chicago -- Neal Gabler, in a fascinating new book, ''Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity'' (Knopf), explains to us that if we have the Oprah-izing of America in the 1990s, it is only because we first had the Winchellizing of it in the 1930s.Walter Winchell was a minor hoofer and singer in vaudeville. He ** had started out in a boys' act with people who rose higher on the circuit than he did -- George Jessel and Eddie Cantor. But Winchell and his wife did well enough to stay alive for a few years singing and dancing.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
John James Urbanski, a trumpeter who knew hundreds of popular songs from memory and played in theatrical orchestra pits during his seven decades of entertaining, died of heart failure Monday at the North Oaks Retirement Community. The Parkville resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised on Andre Street in Locust Point, he attended city public schools until the 10th grade. He declined a scholarship to play soccer at Calvert Hall College High School and quit school to help support his family.
NEWS
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Contributing Writer | September 18, 1994
To say that a show about a striptease artist suffers from overexposure may seem odd.The hit 1959 musical "Gypsy," the fascinating story of burlesque queen Gypsy Rose Lee, made show business history. But after countless stage productions, a popular movie version and a recent television production starring Bette Midler, this show has been done to death.One would hope, then, that the Phoenix Festival Theater production playing at Harford Community College through next Sunday would offer some fresh perspective, updated choreography or perhaps some contemporary twist.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
George M. Cohan (1878-1942) was the son of an Irish-American vaudeville couple. He began performing as a child and grew up to be a phenomenally talented performer, playwright, song writer, director and producer. Cohan's career is celebrated in George M, a 1968 Broadway musical by Michael Stewart and John and Francine Pascal. The show, a feast of old-time song and dance, is running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through June 10 in a brisk production directed by Toby Orenstein. Cohan wrote more than 500 songs, but his reputation today rests on a handful of great numbers that appeared between 1904 and 1906 -- "Give My Regards to Broadway," "The Yankee Doodle Boy," "Mary's a Grand Old Name," "Harrigan," "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There" (1917)
FEATURES
By STEVE McKERROW | July 13, 1991
They've been the bane of generations of parents, an unfathomable annoyance to anyone who likes to combine the words "comedy" and "sophisticated," and the object of mimicry for countless comics.Yet a local independent station WNUV-FM, Channel 54, is wondering whether viewers need more of "The Three Stooges" in their lives.As Curly might say, "soitainly!"The station has scheduled a "Stooges"-a-thon tonight (beginning 8), airing six episodes of the slapstick trio's two-reel movie shorts that were subsequently packaged into an often-repeated TV series.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
Raymond M. Corbin has a face for deception.It is thin and pointed with a sinister goatee and piercing eyes. It's the face of Ray-Mond, the Aristocrat of Deception, magician from Westminster who for 70 years has dazzled audiences as diverse as schoolchildren in Carroll County and Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace.As many as 400 people will pay tribute to Ray-Mond tomorrow at Frock's Sunnybrook Farm in Westminster for a lifetime of community service. But the unflagging, self-promoting showman is renowned in magicians' circles everywhere.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
They have spent $62 million of public and private money to transform the Hippodrome Theater from a decrepit hulk on downtown Baltimore's west side into the region's sparkling showcase for Broadway shows. But a month before actors take the stage for opening night of The Producers, those guiding the theater's revival say the public does not seem to realize what a big change has taken place on North Eutaw Street. "I think it's still a well-kept secret in Baltimore," said Mark Sissman, president and chief executive of the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. "I was just with a bank manager, and she was shocked it was getting redone."
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