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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | November 30, 1993
GENUINE vaudeville in Baltimore has been dead since the early 1950s. (We're not talking here about burlesque, an offshoot of vaudeville, or the strip show, an offshoot of burlesque you can see tonight on The Block.)But now comes the National Museum of Live Entertainment Inc., a nonprofit group headed by Donald Hicken. He is talking about reopening the Hippodrome Theater, 12 N. Eutaw St., as a sort of "Smithsonian of live entertainment."There's still something magic that happens in live entertainment," he says, "and it's even more magic as we move away from it. We're going to keep the lamp lit."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 10, 2010
Harry R. Rosofsky, a retired vaudeville entertainer whose tap-dancing bird act during the 1940s and 1950s was described by a critic as "one of the most unusual novelty attractions in show business," died Aug. 26 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 90 and had lived at the Westminster House Apartments in Mount Vernon. The son of grocers, Mr. Rosofsky — whose stage name was Ross Harvey — was born in Baltimore and raised on Norfolk Avenue in Northwest Baltimore.
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NEWS
August 9, 1992
Services for Harriett Rose Kramer, a Baltimore native who danced in vaudeville, were conducted yesterday at the Frampton-Hawkins-Eskow Funeral Home in Federalsburg.Mrs. Kramer, who was 75 and lived in Broadkill Beach, Del., died Tuesday at a hospital in Milford, Del., after a heart attack.The former Harriett Rose Dunaway was a native of Baltimore and attended Western High. As a young woman, she toured vaudeville theaters as part of a two-girl dance act. While on tour she met trumpeter John Kramer, and they settled in the Baltimore area after their marriage.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 9, 2009
MICKEY CARROLL, 89 One of last surviving Munchkins from 'Wizard of Oz' Mickey Carroll, one of the last surviving Munchkins from the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz, died Thursday of natural causes at a caretaker's home in Crestwood, Mo. While in elementary school, Mr. Carroll danced at the Muny Opera. When his father died when Mr. Carroll was in his teens, he helped support his family by working in vaudeville. He later traveled to Chicago and worked in clubs and on the Orpheum Theater vaudeville circuit.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
For a dead art form, there's a lot of life left in vaudeville.A turn-of-the-century theatrical experience that put the emphasis not so much talent as personality, exuberance and speed, vaudeville may have been the ultimate example of giving the people what they want. Singers, dancers, comedians, sword-swallowers, plate-spinners: Everyone was welcome on the vaudeville stage, as long as they could keep the paying customers happy."Vaudeville," an "American Masters" special airing at 8 tonight on PBS, is fleshed out with vintage film clips (many from the silent era)
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | January 15, 1995
Although there's a lot of clowning around at Towson State University, there's no need to become alarmed about declining academic standards. This is officially sanctioned funny business.Clowns, jugglers, mimes and all sorts of other movement-theater folks are converging on TSU for the sixth annual Mid-Atlantic Movement Theatre Festival, running through Sunday. Kicking off the exquisitely choreographed silliness is the one-ring, San Francisco-based New Pickle Family Circus. It'll perform a movie spoof titled "Jump Cuts!"
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
Can vaudeville make a comeback in this electronic era of channel surfing and virtual reality?That's the question facing a local group seeking to restore Baltimore's once-magnificent Hippodrome Theater to its 1914 splendor.The National Museum of Live Entertainment Inc., a private, nonprofit group headed by Donald Hicken, last week secured an option to buy the vacant theater at 12 N. Eutaw St. for "about $800,000" from an affiliate of Continental Realty.The option gives the group until early next year to determine whether it would be feasible to reopen the building as part of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's effort to transform the Howard Street corridor into an "avenue of the arts."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
Baltimore's downtown entertainment district was born out of the ashes of the 1904 fire that leveled the commercial heart of the city.Far different from the uptown world of Howard Street where the higher-priced straight plays and musical comedies played, The Block, as it came to be known, began as a stretch of penny arcades, shooting galleries and vaudeville parlors.Just two years after the fire that leveled so much of Baltimore, the street's major landmark made its debut. Called The Gayety, it opened at 405 E. Baltimore St. on Feb. 5, 1906.
NEWS
October 3, 1998
IS IT A good idea to spend millions in taxpayers' money to turn Baltimore's old Hippodrome Theater into a 2,200-seat cultural center?Members of the House Appropriations Committee, touring the abandoned Eutaw Street vaudeville house recently, voiced reservations. They worry that the projected $35 million in renovation costs might go much higher. They also wonder whether the rundown neighborhood would scare away potential theater-goers.Their concerns are justified. Yet legislators ought to give free rein to their imagination and examine the Hippodrome project in a wider context.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 10, 2010
Harry R. Rosofsky, a retired vaudeville entertainer whose tap-dancing bird act during the 1940s and 1950s was described by a critic as "one of the most unusual novelty attractions in show business," died Aug. 26 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 90 and had lived at the Westminster House Apartments in Mount Vernon. The son of grocers, Mr. Rosofsky — whose stage name was Ross Harvey — was born in Baltimore and raised on Norfolk Avenue in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2008
Beatrice A. "Bobbie" Chudzik a former vaudeville performer and animal lover, died of ovarian cancer Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 85. Beatrice Valachovic was born in Baton Rouge, La., and moved with her family to New York City, where she attended city public schools. In the late 1930s, Mrs. Chudzik, who was a singer and dancer, joined a vaudeville troupe with her sister, Nona, playing theaters in the Northeast. She performed with Jimmy Durante, the Mills Brothers, Nat King Cole and Jack E. Leonard, among other celebrities, said her son, Michael B. O'Connell of Acton, Mass.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
George M. Cohan (1878-1942) was the son of an Irish-American vaudeville couple. He began performing as a child and grew up to be a phenomenally talented performer, playwright, song writer, director and producer. Cohan's career is celebrated in George M, a 1968 Broadway musical by Michael Stewart and John and Francine Pascal. The show, a feast of old-time song and dance, is running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through June 10 in a brisk production directed by Toby Orenstein. Cohan wrote more than 500 songs, but his reputation today rests on a handful of great numbers that appeared between 1904 and 1906 -- "Give My Regards to Broadway," "The Yankee Doodle Boy," "Mary's a Grand Old Name," "Harrigan," "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There" (1917)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
William Shakespeare wrote plays for the masses. So if he were alive today, chances are he'd be writing Broadway musicals. Composer Richard Rodgers, lyricist Lorenz Hart and playwright/director George Abbott blazed the way in 1938 with the first Broadway musical based on a Shakespeare play. Abbott adapted the script for The Boys from Syracuse from Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, and Rodgers and Hart filled it with such gems as "Falling in Love With Love" and "This Can't Be Love." The Boys from Syracuse runs through Jan. 14 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. $10-$65.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | November 15, 2006
The Town Theatre, the former west-side vaudeville house that will be Everyman Theatre's new home, closed in 1990 - coincidentally, the year Everyman was founded. But the Town had a long, colorful history before that. Originally called the Empire, the theater was designed by Otto Simonson of Baltimore and W.H. McElfatrick of New York. It opened on Christmas Day in 1911, with seating for more than 2,200 on several levels, as well as pool parlors, a soda fountain and a rathskeller, as Robert Kirk Headley Jr. recounted in his 1974 book, Exit: A History of Movies in Baltimore.
FEATURES
May 17, 2006
Vaudeville Yard Dogs Road Show at Ottobar At 9 tonight, check out the Yard Dogs Road Show, a troupe of saloon vaudeville performers at the Ottobar. Expect light bulb- and fire-eating and general cra ziness. Local burlesque act Trix ie Little opens. The Ottobar is at 2549 N. Howard St. Tickets are $10. Call 410-662-0069 or go to theottobar.com.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
John James Urbanski, a trumpeter who knew hundreds of popular songs from memory and played in theatrical orchestra pits during his seven decades of entertaining, died of heart failure Monday at the North Oaks Retirement Community. The Parkville resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised on Andre Street in Locust Point, he attended city public schools until the 10th grade. He declined a scholarship to play soccer at Calvert Hall College High School and quit school to help support his family.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1997
As I watched Talent Machine's "Santa's Frosty Follies" on Saturday night at St. John's College, I was overwhelmed by the numbers.Forty-five young people ages 3 to 19. Two full acts bulging at the seams with 27 production numbers, many of them sporting multiple songs, each requiring its own choreography and staging.Costume changes? Don't ask. I lost count about a third of the way through Act I."Follies," suffice to say, is a Christmas vaudeville show mounted on the largest possible scale.It's bright, pizzazzy, high-kicking stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KARA WEDEKIND and KARA WEDEKIND,SUN REPORTER | November 3, 2005
Nice Jewish Girls Gone Bad is not a Fox television special or the newest spinoff from the Girls Gone Wild video industry. It is a comedy-burlesque-spoken word hybrid that aims to challenge stereotypes of Jewish women through song, dance and parody of Fiddler on the Roof. The show's creator is New York-based singer/comedian Susannah Perlman, whose transition from member of the cheery group Up with People to the producer of this show's Hasidic striptease gives the show's title a little added significance.
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