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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Cardinal William H. Keeler joined Roman Catholic and Jewish leaders yesterday to light the first permanent menorah in Vatican City during the commemoration of Yom Hashoah, the annual Holocaust Memorial Day.The six-branch menorah was placed on the grounds of the Pontifical North American College, a seminary for American students studying for the priesthood in Rome. Keeler was chairman of the board of the college until recently and was instrumental in having the Menorah placed there."It is a reminder that people not forget the Shoah, the Holocaust," Keeler said in a telephone interview from Rome.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Ever since she met Pope John Paul II when she was a schoolgirl in 1995, Melissa Brent has frequently replayed the brief encounter in her mind. But when she learned that John Paul would be canonized as a saint this weekend, she burst into tears. "Everything was just real, all of those emotions just hit me at once. … All these years and it's like, 'Wow, I met a saint and I can feel it,' " said Brent, a 26-year-old nurse now living in Virginia Beach. In 1995, Brent was living in Columbia with her family and attending third grade at St. William of York School in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By JEFF ISRAELY and JEFF ISRAELY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 1999
VATICAN CITY -- For some Italians, dropping an important letter in the mailbox is cause for a quick prayer. Mail sent through Italy's famously unreliable postal service can take weeks or months to get where it's going.But in the heart of Rome is a post office that handles mail efficiently, with no need for divine intervention.Vatican City, the 108-acre island of Roman Catholic Church rule inside the city limits of Rome, is a virtually self-sufficient nation-state with a police force and a pharmacy, a diplomatic staff, a supermarket and a range of other services available to anyone who lives or works within its confines.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
As their church's cardinals gathered in Vatican City to select a new pope, Catholic schoolchildren in the Baltimore area joined the worldwide buzz over the secret balloting process in an online chat with a fairly well-placed source: Archbishop William E. Lori. "I'm not going to predict who the Holy Father is going to be," Lori told eighth-grade students at 20 schools in the Baltimore Archdiocese on Monday. "But what we can't miss is that at least two of the American cardinals have been spoken about as possible candidates.
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Feb. 11 1929 The Lateran Treaty was signed, with Italy recognizing the independence and sovereignty of Vatican City.
FEATURES
June 7, 2001
Today in history: June 7 In 1769, frontiersman Daniel Boone first began to explore the present-day Bluegrass State. In 1776, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia proposed to the Continental Congress a resolution for a Declaration of Independence. In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president at his party's convention in Baltimore. In 1929, the sovereign state of Vatican City came into existence as copies of the Lateran Treaty were exchanged in Rome. In 1998, in a crime that shocked the nation, James Byrd Jr., a 49-year-old black man, was chained to a pickup truck and dragged to his death in Jasper, Texas.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Workers hauled in trunks marked diplomatico. Crews labored over the entrance foyer. Maids gathered in the basement cafeteria to rest for a moment. There were so many things left to do yesterday to prepare the Casa Santa Marta for the conclave of cardinals it host to beginning April 18, when they begin their secret deliberations to elect a new pope. "Yes, I'm nervous," sighed one maid, who declined to give her name because neither the hotel staff nor its construction crews are allowed to speak publicly about their role.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
Catholic bishops reaffirm stance on celibacy of priests VATICAN CITY -- The first Synod of Bishops under Pope Benedict XVI ended yesterday with an embrace of tradition, acknowledging the severity of the shortage of priests in the Roman Catholic Church but rejecting solutions such as allowing married priests. "There has been a massive restatement of the importance of the tradition in the Latin Church of mandatory celibacy," Cardinal George Pell, archbishop of Sydney, Australia, told a news conference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2003
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II told the archbishop of Canterbury yesterday that the acceptance of openly gay clergy members by many Anglicans presented "new and serious difficulties" in relations between the two churches. His remark came during the first meeting here between the pope and the current archbishop, the Most Rev. Rowan Williams, the spiritual leader of more than 75 million Anglicans worldwide. Williams assumed that post this year and soon confronted a furious debate over homosexuality that threatens to rend the Anglican Communion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 25, 2003
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II did not show up here yesterday for one of his regularly scheduled public appearances, an unusual absence that comes at a time of increased concern over his health. The pope's spokesman, Dr. Joaquin Navarro-Valls, said in a written statement that the reason was an unspecified intestinal problem that had struck Pope John Paul, 83, Tuesday afternoon. Navarro-Valls said that physicians had advised the pope to cancel the weekly appearance, held on Wednesdays, when the pope welcomes and delivers remarks to Roman Catholic pilgrims in a Vatican hall.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
The Roman Catholic Church is at the most perplexing time in it's storied, at times sordid, history. For the first time in more than 600 years, a pope has chosen to retire, due mostly to deteriorating health issues. Is that truly the most prominent reason for his very hasty departure? I think not. The church faces myriad pressing issues, most notably worldwide sexual molestation at the hands of Roman Catholic priests. Cardinal Keith O'Brien of Scotland abruptly stepped down amid allegations he had sexual liaisons with young priests 20 years ago. This would have been a perfect and fitting opportunity for the Vatican to begin an immediate and transparent turn-around.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
Growing up in Rome, not far from Saint Peter's Basilica (whose dome I could see from my parents' bedroom) I did not think much of my circumstance. I thought it was just normal to drive my scooter by the Vatican walls and to see the Swiss guards seriously guarding the entrance to Vatican City. I also thought it normal to be able to go into Vatican City (as my father was a Vatican employee) to buy cheaper gas and imported goods free of the high Italian taxes. It is only after moving to America that I realized the exceptional luck of my youth.
NEWS
By From Sun news service reports | January 25, 2009
Bishops' rehabilitation prompts protests 4 VATICAN CITY : Pope Benedict XVI has lifted the excommunications of four traditionalist bishops, including that of a Holocaust denier whose rehabilitation sparked outrage among Jewish groups. The four bishops were excommunicated 20 years ago after they were consecrated by the late ultraconservative Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre without papal consent - a move the Vatican said at the time was an act of schism. The Vatican said yesterday that Pope Benedict had rehabilitated the four as part of his efforts to bring Lefebvre's Society of St. Pius X back into the Vatican's fold.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | April 15, 2008
WASHINGTON -- From the moment Shepherd One touches down today at Andrews Air Force Base, Pope Benedict XVI will be afforded all the protection due a man who is both a head of state - Vatican City - and leader of the world's largest church. Airspace will be restricted, waterways blockaded and streets shut down for the pontiff, who is making the first papal visit to the United States since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 - and his first trip anywhere since al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden accused him of leading a "new Crusade" against Muslims.
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Feb. 11 1929 The Lateran Treaty was signed, with Italy recognizing the independence and sovereignty of Vatican City.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and James Gerstenzang and Tracy Wilkinson and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2007
VATICAN CITY -- With Italians converging on Rome to decry the war in Iraq, President Bush received a more subtle but pointed message yesterday about America's Middle East policy in his first meeting with Pope Benedict XVI. Pope Benedict urged the U.S. president to pursue a "regional and negotiated" solution to the violent crises engulfing the Middle East, a Vatican statement said, and voiced alarm about "the worrying situation in Iraq" and the plight of...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 9, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II's successor won't just face dwindling church attendance and an elderly priesthood: He also has to find new revenue to balance the Vatican's budget. After making a gain for eight years, the Holy See, the central administration for the church, ran deficits in the three years through 2003, the Vatican's financial statements show. The separately run budget for Vatican City, the independent papal state in Rome, was also in the red in 2003, the latest year for which figures are available.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
Growing up in Rome, not far from Saint Peter's Basilica (whose dome I could see from my parents' bedroom) I did not think much of my circumstance. I thought it was just normal to drive my scooter by the Vatican walls and to see the Swiss guards seriously guarding the entrance to Vatican City. I also thought it normal to be able to go into Vatican City (as my father was a Vatican employee) to buy cheaper gas and imported goods free of the high Italian taxes. It is only after moving to America that I realized the exceptional luck of my youth.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
VATICAN CITY -- Pope Benedict XVI made his most important change yet in the Vatican hierarchy yesterday, placing in the church's No. 2 position a conservative cardinal who once tried to lead a boycott of the novel The Da Vinci Code. The Vatican announced the appointment of Italian Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone of Genoa as secretary of state, a position similar to that of prime minister. He will succeed Cardinal Angelo Sodano, 78, who held the post for 15 years and became especially powerful as the health of Pope John Paul II deteriorated.
NEWS
April 10, 2006
At least 30 killed in Pakistani stampede ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- At least 30 people were killed in a stampede at the end of a religious gathering for women in the southern port city of Karachi, police and hospital officials said yesterday. Scores of women and children were also injured. About 10,000 women had gathered at an Islamic center, Faizan-e-Madina, in the Sabzi Mandi neighborhood of Karachi, Pakistan's largest city, to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, which will be celebrated tomorrow.
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