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NEWS
August 30, 2005
On August 27, 2005, MARIAN H. (nee Hill) VARNEY of Shrewsbury, formerly of Baltimore, wife of the late Sumner O. Varney, mother of Richard C. Varney & his wife Barbara. Also survived by a grandson Robert Varney and two great-grandsons: Kyle & Tyler Varney. She was predeceased by a son Robert S. Varney. Funeral services will be held 8:00 P.M. Wednesday August 31, 2005, at J.J. Hartenstein Mortuary Inc., 24 Second St. New Freedom, Pa. Following cremation interment will be private. Friends may call at the Mortuary from 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Wednesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2006
On Monday, January 16, 2006, MAURICE LEADERMAN; beloved husband of Roxana Leaderman (nee Wolpert); loving father of Bennett Leaderman of Deep Creek Lake, MD., and Arthur Leaderman of University Park, MD.; loving father-in-law of Rebecca Rubenstein and Alice Varney Leaderman; devoted brother of the late Alexander "Zandy" Leaderman, Mollie Mernick and Edith Bugatch; beloved grandfather of Nancy Leaderman-Bray, Eve Mahowald, Elizabeth Naomi Leaderman and...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | February 20, 2000
The film world suffered a loss with the recent death of comic actor Jim Varney. Varney might have made his reputation with the idiotic "Ernest" movies, but his last film performance was no doubt his most inspired. In "Existo," he plays a member of a manic performance art group trying to do battle with the forces of Christian fundamentalism. The film, which had its Baltimore premiere last year at MicroCineFest and returns Saturday to the Charles Theatre for a limited run, is filled with indelible moments, among them star Bruce Arnston hopping around on a pogo-stick that resembles a part of the male anatomy.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
Suddenly on September 4, 2005, TIMOTHY J. CHANEY, 57, of Davenport, FL, formerly of Baltimore, MD. He is survived by Mrs. Heidi Chaney, son Sean Chaney and daughter Lisa Chaney-Black, granddaughters, Jessie and Cassie. Son of the late Philip J., and Barbara E. Chaney, brother of Kathleen Varney, Mary Parrott, Michael Chaney, Brian Chaney, Philip J. Chaney, III, and Kevin Chaney and the late Phyllis Chaney. A memorial service is planned for September 15, 2005, at 11 A. M at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Thurmont, MD.
NEWS
January 18, 2006
On Monday, January 16, 2006, MAURICE LEADERMAN; beloved husband of Roxana Leaderman (nee Wolpert); loving father of Bennett Leaderman of Deep Creek Lake, MD., and Arthur Leaderman of University Park, MD.; loving father-in-law of Rebecca Rubenstein and Alice Varney Leaderman; devoted brother of the late Alexander "Zandy" Leaderman, Mollie Mernick and Edith Bugatch; beloved grandfather of Nancy Leaderman-Bray, Eve Mahowald, Elizabeth Naomi Leaderman and...
NEWS
September 6, 1993
Alice B. VarneyRegistered nurseAlice B. Varney, a registered nurse and Baltimore native, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at Francis Asbury Manor in Ocean Grove, N.J. She was 91.The former Alice Moore Bennett was reared in East Baltimore and graduated from Eastern High School. She became a registered nurse after completing course work at the University of Maryland School of Nursing.She was the night supervisor of nursing at University Hospital when she married Dr. William H. Varney in 1932.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
Suddenly on September 4, 2005, TIMOTHY J. CHANEY, 57, of Davenport, FL, formerly of Baltimore, MD. He is survived by Mrs. Heidi Chaney, son Sean Chaney and daughter Lisa Chaney-Black, granddaughters, Jessie and Cassie. Son of the late Philip J., and Barbara E. Chaney, brother of Kathleen Varney, Mary Parrott, Michael Chaney, Brian Chaney, Philip J. Chaney, III, and Kevin Chaney and the late Phyllis Chaney. A memorial service is planned for September 15, 2005, at 11 A. M at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Thurmont, MD.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2001
A 71-year-old man lay motionless on a hospital gurney, tubes entering his mouth and arm, a foam brace holding his neck unnaturally taut. "Can you wiggle your toes?" Dr. Shawn Varney called out yesterday, his face just inches from the unconscious patient. "Can you wiggle your fingers?" Varney, a 37-year-old emergency physician, is an Air Force major who has come to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore to gain experience treating the sorts of injuries that are encountered during war. An elderly man with a head injury - the patient suffered a brain hemorrhage when he fell and hit his head at his home in West Baltimore - might seem to have little in common with an injured soldier.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 25, 2000
One of the biggest hits of last year's MicroCineFest was "Existo," a wackily subversive musical comedy made by the same Nashville artists who brought us the "Ernest" movies. The film, which stars Nashville performance artist Bruce Arnston, won the festival's grand prize and audience awards for best feature and returns tomorrow to the Charles Theatre by popular demand. Baltimore filmgoers were not alone in their enthusiasm for the film, according to Arnston, who plays the movie's title character -- an inspired, slightly addled poet-provocateur fomenting an anti-fundamentalist revolution.
NEWS
By Sean Elder | April 6, 2000
THE WAR DRUMS started beating last week, after it was announced that talks between Microsoft and the Department of Justice had broken down. Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson would render his verdict Monday, it was speculated, and it wasn't going to be pretty. The press could hardly wait. The Microsoft decision is, of course, a bona fide big deal; stocks trembled and fell in anticipation of Judge Jackson's decision and legitimate historical questions about the relevance of anti-trust legislation in the age of the Internet were on the lips of news readers who thought Sherman was Peabody's assistant.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
On August 27, 2005, MARIAN H. (nee Hill) VARNEY of Shrewsbury, formerly of Baltimore, wife of the late Sumner O. Varney, mother of Richard C. Varney & his wife Barbara. Also survived by a grandson Robert Varney and two great-grandsons: Kyle & Tyler Varney. She was predeceased by a son Robert S. Varney. Funeral services will be held 8:00 P.M. Wednesday August 31, 2005, at J.J. Hartenstein Mortuary Inc., 24 Second St. New Freedom, Pa. Following cremation interment will be private. Friends may call at the Mortuary from 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2001
A 71-year-old man lay motionless on a hospital gurney, tubes entering his mouth and arm, a foam brace holding his neck unnaturally taut. "Can you wiggle your toes?" Dr. Shawn Varney called out yesterday, his face just inches from the unconscious patient. "Can you wiggle your fingers?" Varney, a 37-year-old emergency physician, is an Air Force major who has come to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore to gain experience treating the sorts of injuries that are encountered during war. An elderly man with a head injury - the patient suffered a brain hemorrhage when he fell and hit his head at his home in West Baltimore - might seem to have little in common with an injured soldier.
NEWS
By Sean Elder | April 6, 2000
THE WAR DRUMS started beating last week, after it was announced that talks between Microsoft and the Department of Justice had broken down. Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson would render his verdict Monday, it was speculated, and it wasn't going to be pretty. The press could hardly wait. The Microsoft decision is, of course, a bona fide big deal; stocks trembled and fell in anticipation of Judge Jackson's decision and legitimate historical questions about the relevance of anti-trust legislation in the age of the Internet were on the lips of news readers who thought Sherman was Peabody's assistant.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 25, 2000
One of the biggest hits of last year's MicroCineFest was "Existo," a wackily subversive musical comedy made by the same Nashville artists who brought us the "Ernest" movies. The film, which stars Nashville performance artist Bruce Arnston, won the festival's grand prize and audience awards for best feature and returns tomorrow to the Charles Theatre by popular demand. Baltimore filmgoers were not alone in their enthusiasm for the film, according to Arnston, who plays the movie's title character -- an inspired, slightly addled poet-provocateur fomenting an anti-fundamentalist revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | February 20, 2000
The film world suffered a loss with the recent death of comic actor Jim Varney. Varney might have made his reputation with the idiotic "Ernest" movies, but his last film performance was no doubt his most inspired. In "Existo," he plays a member of a manic performance art group trying to do battle with the forces of Christian fundamentalism. The film, which had its Baltimore premiere last year at MicroCineFest and returns Saturday to the Charles Theatre for a limited run, is filled with indelible moments, among them star Bruce Arnston hopping around on a pogo-stick that resembles a part of the male anatomy.
NEWS
September 6, 1993
Alice B. VarneyRegistered nurseAlice B. Varney, a registered nurse and Baltimore native, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at Francis Asbury Manor in Ocean Grove, N.J. She was 91.The former Alice Moore Bennett was reared in East Baltimore and graduated from Eastern High School. She became a registered nurse after completing course work at the University of Maryland School of Nursing.She was the night supervisor of nursing at University Hospital when she married Dr. William H. Varney in 1932.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 27, 1991
Jim Varney has said that there's a little of every man in his alter ego, the lovable goofball Ernest P. Worrell."And I do stress 'just a little,' " the actor said in a recent interview to promote his latest comedy, "Ernest Scared Stupid."And in spite of what audiences might believe, there's more than Ernest in Jim Varney.Mr. Varney and director John Cherry have helped make the character a mainstay in American culture. With more than 4,000 commercials on television and radio, it's tough not to have seen or heard Ernest at some time or another.
FEATURES
By David A. Keeps, Special to Tribune Newspapers | December 1, 2011
In "Mr. Color," his lavish new 232-page coffee table book, Carleton Varney provides plenty of proof to back up his nickname. The book, subtitled "The Greenbrier and Other Decorating Adventures," takes readers on a tour of the greatest hotel projects of Dorothy Draper, the midcentury Manhattan decorator (and Varney mentor) whose style could be called Park Avenue Rococo. Varney, now president of Dorothy Draper and Co., updated the venerable interiors of The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., and the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island in Michigan, and his book lovingly describes the method to his colorful madness.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 27, 1991
Jim Varney has said that there's a little of every man in his alter ego, the lovable goofball Ernest P. Worrell."And I do stress 'just a little,' " the actor said in a recent interview to promote his latest comedy, "Ernest Scared Stupid."And in spite of what audiences might believe, there's more than Ernest in Jim Varney.Mr. Varney and director John Cherry have helped make the character a mainstay in American culture. With more than 4,000 commercials on television and radio, it's tough not to have seen or heard Ernest at some time or another.
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