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Varicose Veins

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HEALTH
July 29, 2010
Varicose veins, the unsightly and often painful condition, affects one out of two people above age 50, according to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Robert A. Weiss, a dermatologic surgeon at the Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute and past president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, says newer, less-invasive treatments exist now, such as endovenous laser therapy, that have replaced "the old, barbaric procedure of stripping." He answered some questions about the condition.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014
Annapolis Center These activities are being offered through the Annapolis Senior Activity Center, 119 S. Villa Ave. Information: 410-222-1818. Free concerts: •Project Natale, Wednesday, April 23, 12:30 p.m. •Red Right Return, Monday, April 28, 12:30 p.m. Varicose veins Joseph McClain of Maryland Vein Professionals will speak at 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 23, on why varicose veins should not be considered a cosmetic problem but a sign of venous insufficiency, a disorder of the circulatory system.
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HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 4, 2010
Treating twisted, bulging varicose veins used to require painful invasive surgery. Today, a booming industry beckons patients with free screenings and deals on "lunch break" treatments promising faster, more effective and painless procedures. But how do you know which treatment to choose - or if you need to be treated at all? Are varicose veins a legitimate medical problem, or purely cosmetic? For many of the estimated 20 million Americans with the condition, varicose veins are ugly and bothersome, not an indication of a medical problem.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Hemorrhoids can be a painful and embarrassing condition, but many people suffer from it, especially as they get older. Luckily, the condition is easy to treat. Sergey Kantsevoy, director of the Center for Therapeutic Endoscopy at Mercy Medical Center, said one new treatment is simpler and quicker than the older options. What are hemorrhoids and what causes them? Hemorrhoids are the clumps or pillow-like clusters of veins and supporting tissue, including muscle and elastic fiber, that lie within the anal canal just beneath the mucous membranes.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 3, 1993
Q: One of my friends told me about sclerotherapy that was used to treat her varicose veins. What is sclerotherapy? Is it an accepted form of treatment?A: Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins resulting from a defect in venous valves that normally aid in the return of blood to the heart. Valve failure leads to a backward flow of blood (away from the heart) with venous pooling of the blood causing the varicose veins.Sclerotherapy involves injecting into the swollen veins a solution that irritates and damages the inner lining of the veins.
FEATURES
By Dr.Neil Solomon | December 25, 1990
Dear Dr. Solomon: I have varicose veins. I'd like to know if the injection treatments used for this are safe and effective. -- Mr. A.P.Dear Mr. A.P.: Sclerotherapy is both safe and effective. The procedure involves injecting a chemical solution into the vein, killing the cells that line it. The blood is then spontaneously redirected into healthy veins. This eases the pressure on the veins whose valves have failed (which gave rise to the varicose veins), making the varicose veins less obvious.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | September 10, 1991
After years of hiding her legs under long slacks, Nancy Revella was looking forward to a vacation in Ocean City last summer without worrying that her kids would ask -- yet again -- "Mom, what are those bumps on your legs?"The bumps were varicose veins -- unsightly, swollen blood vessels that had begun to bulge during her first pregnancy and had worsened during the second. Her distress was more than just cosmetic: "My legs were throbbing and restless," she says ++ now.But that's all a memory.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 27, 2006
Now that it's harder to get decongestants containing pseudoephedrine, will cold and allergy sufferers have to make do with weaker over-the-counter drugs? That depends. As of Sept. 30, the effective date of an amendment to the U.S. Patriot Act, nasal products containing pseudoephedrine must be sold "behind the counter," which means the purchaser has to show a photo ID and sign a log book to get them. The idea is to make it harder for illegal drug suppliers to make methamphetamine from pseudoephedrine, though whether the new law will do so is an open question.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 15, 2002
Q. I was alarmed to read that eating licorice can lead to high blood pressure, weakness, fatigue, loss of libido and mineral imbalance. Is this only true of black licorice? I eat a good deal of strawberry licorice. Besides the obvious excess sugar, are there any problems with this product? A. You have nothing to worry about (except for the calories). The ingredient that can cause so many serious side effects is glycyrrhizin. This is the natural flavor found in black licorice, but it is absent from red "licorice."
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2005
A Towson doctor who uses a Web site to promote the laser treatment of varicose veins filed more than $500,000 worth of fake insurance claims in order to receive Medicare reimbursement, federal prosecutors alleged yesterday. In a civil complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Dr. David C. McCarus, 54, of Timonium is accused of bilking government health insurance programs for four years by performing elective work such as laser hair and stretch mark removal and billing the procedures as medically necessary.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 4, 2012
On Friday, Ravens coach John Harbaugh didn't sound optimistic that Matt Birk would be available for Thursday night's preseason opener at the Atlanta Falcons. But the 36-year-old center said Saturday that he is holding out hope that he might be able to play Thursday. “I hope I don't” miss the game, Birk said after the team's practice at M&T Bank Stadium on Saturday. “We talked today, and although you can't predict the future, I hope I don't. My goal is to be out there.” Birk confirmed Harbaugh's diagnosis that back spasms have shelved him for the past six days.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Like many young men who labored through youth football leagues, high school competition and eventually the college gridiron, Gino Gradkowski had visions of reaching the pinnacle of his profession and playing in the NFL. But Gradkowski - whose dream became reality when the Ravens used the first of two fourth-round picks in April's draft to select the Delaware product - conceded that there was one facet that gave him reason to pause. "You hear the horror stories about the NFL, about the guys who tell you the wrong thing or just won't talk to you at all," the rookie center-guard said.
SPORTS
July 24, 2012
After undergoing surgery to repair varicose veins in his legs, Matt Birk said he feels optimistic that his legs won't be a hindrance for him during the upcoming season. “I feel better,” the Ravens starting center said Tuesday, after the team's opening day of training camp . “[The doctors] say it'll help me feel better during the season. My leg won't get as fatigued. So it's a good thing.” Birk was among the limited group of players (quarterbacks, rookies and injured veterans)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 12, 2012
The Ravens opened up their mandatory minicamp Tuesday afternoon without two starters from their offensive line. Offensive tackle Bryant McKinnie and center Matt Birk were not on the rain-soaked practice field, though head coach John Harbaugh said their absences were excused. McKinnie was held out of practice due to concerns about his conditioning, but he was inside the practice facility. Meanwhile, Birk had surgery to have varicose veins fixed in his legs, something that has been on his plans since the end of last season but wasn't taken care of until last week.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
Many women of child-bearing years feel pain in their pelvic area and don't know what it is. It gets worse as the day goes on, and with each pregnancy. Their doctors also sometimes can't determine the cause. Dr. Kelvin Hong, an assistant professor of radiology and surgery at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, said it could be pelvic congestion syndrome. And it could get worse over time. Question: What is pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS)? Answer: According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pelvic congestion syndrome is one of the recognized causes of chronic pelvic pain.
HEALTH
July 29, 2010
Varicose veins, the unsightly and often painful condition, affects one out of two people above age 50, according to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Robert A. Weiss, a dermatologic surgeon at the Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute and past president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, says newer, less-invasive treatments exist now, such as endovenous laser therapy, that have replaced "the old, barbaric procedure of stripping." He answered some questions about the condition.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | December 3, 1991
Almost every medication prescribed to treat high blood cholesterol levels can cause muscle pain and interfere with your ability to exercise. I know. I'm writing from experience.My blood cholesterol level has been too high ever since I was in medical school in the 1950s. I once believed that hard exercise would prevent heart attacks, so I took up running and began competing in marathons. Then, in the early 1960s, I learned that running more than 100 miles a week can only lower blood cholesterol a little.
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | December 18, 1991
Even the silliest of today's fashions don't look so odd when they are compared with their historical predecessors.But few comprehensive fashion history books dare to poke fun at centuries of clothing vanity. Lynn Schnurnberger does. The author of "Let There Be Clothes: 40,000 Years of Fashion," (Workman; $19.95), applies wit and an eye for the outrageous to the text and abundant illustrations in her 415-page book.Schnurnberger, a former special consultant in costume to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, took nine years to compile the book, she said during a recent Los Angeles visit.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 4, 2010
Treating twisted, bulging varicose veins used to require painful invasive surgery. Today, a booming industry beckons patients with free screenings and deals on "lunch break" treatments promising faster, more effective and painless procedures. But how do you know which treatment to choose - or if you need to be treated at all? Are varicose veins a legitimate medical problem, or purely cosmetic? For many of the estimated 20 million Americans with the condition, varicose veins are ugly and bothersome, not an indication of a medical problem.
FEATURES
July 5, 2007
Events Legal documents seminars -- The Baltimore County Department of Aging and the law firm of Frank, Frank and Scherr LLC are offering free discussions on health care decision-making, estate planning and asset management in area senior centers this month. The first is at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Parkville Senior Center, 8601 Harford Road in Parkville. Information: 410-887-2594. Classes What is pilates and why you should do it -- Synergy, 8815 Columbia 100 Parkway #2, Columbia / 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
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