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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | April 15, 1995
The first question most people have when they're considering building an addition to an existing structure is: How will it work; how will it attach to the existing building?The answer, like the old joke, is "very carefully."The care becomes even more important when the new addition is being built on top of a previous addition. In that case, the problem becomes how to securely attach the new structure to the old one at the sides and at the floor/ceiling in a way that distributes the load, or weight, securely.
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NEWS
By Thomas Neas, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Vacant buildings are many things: signs of decay, eyesores and dangerous. They might also hold a strong relationship to crime. According to frequently updated data provided by Open Baltimore, there is a strong correlation between vacant buildings and certain crimes, such as shootings and homicides. Common assault, a physical attack, increases from neighborhood to neighborhood as the number of vacant houses increases — a trend shared with crime in general. And it does so at a much more pronounced rate than other crimes.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 7, 2006
Heaven knows it would be great to go to Miami in late January, sip a couple of umbrella drinks at South Beach and spend a week listening to the Ravens tell the national media that no one gave them any credit or believed they could get to the Super Bowl. It would be great to predict that Steve McNair will lead the team to an 11-win season and bang out a couple of playoff wins and maybe get another Most Valuable Player Award. Who among the purple-clad legions wouldn't want to see that? So, let me be the first to say that it is not out of the question ... that it is within the realm of possibility ... that the Ravens are a good-looking team on paper and have a chance to be pretty good on FieldTurf.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
When Orioles season-ticket holders receive their renewal packages in the mail over the next few days, they will find slightly higher average ticket prices and an expanded version of the variable-pricing plan the club has used for single-game ticket sales over the past seven years. The Orioles are raising season-ticket prices on all plans by an average of approximately 5 percent, the first increase in cost since 2008, an Orioles spokeswoman confirmed Friday. Season-ticket packages start at $168 for a 13-game plan; 29-game and full-season packages are also available.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 3, 2000
You seek help on retirement planning and your financial adviser suggests Monte Carlo, drumming up visions in your head of your nest egg disappearing on the spin of a roulette wheel. Time to get a new adviser? Not quite. More likely, the adviser is recommending an increasingly popular financial planning tool: Monte Carlo simulation. It's a mathematical technique that can generate thousands of potential situations using random variables to estimate the probability of an outcome. And when used in retirement planning, it allows investors to put their portfolios and retirement goals through hundreds and even thousands of economic scenarios via computer to figure the likelihood of success.
SPORTS
April 11, 2007
On the use of pitch counts in baseball In today's game, the pitch count can be a little overemphasized - 100 pitches seems to be the cut line for most pitchers these days. I think it's viable in a number of instances, but there are also a number of variables that go into whether it's useful or not. In Japan, pitch count means nothing. A pitcher will be removed only if he is getting roughed up or he is tired.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | August 11, 1996
IF YOU WANT to really understand Anne Arundel County's school construction dilemma, consider an algebraic equation with many variables.One key variable is the number of students in the county. The other is the number of schools and classrooms.Simply matching these two doesn't solve the problem because this particular equation has many more variables.The county needs to have the appropriate number of elementary, middle and high schools for the current school-aged population. Having lots of high school classrooms doesn't work if the elementary population is burgeoning.
NEWS
March 5, 2000
Why not use state surplus for shock trauma? I'm certain that all Marylanders, including myself, fully appreciate the excellent service rendered by the Shock Trauma Center. Why, however, when the state of Maryland has the largest tax surplus in its history, would it be necessary, as recommended by The Sun, to increase the annual surcharge on motor vehicle registrations? History tells us that once that tax is in place it will never be rescinded. I have been a reader of The Sun for 40 years and cannot recall your editorial staff ever opposing any tax increases.
NEWS
January 25, 1999
IT'S EASY to second guess a police officer who fires his or her gun. Even officers who have been in such a situation can't say they would react the same way every time. Any number of variables -- even how much sleep the officer got the night before -- could have an impact on the choice he makes. The decision that Howard County police Sgt. A. J. Bellido de Luna made last Tuesday left a man dead. John R. Sierra, 39, of Ellicott City died after being shot once in the chest by the officer. Sgt. Bellido de Luna had responded to a report of an intoxicated man with a knife.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 5, 1992
Washington. --Last week, while that spoonful of silliness called Perot was pondering whether to make of himself a gift to the nation, two of Washington's grown-ups, going against the grain of this political season, said something both radical and sensible.Sens. Pete Domenici, the New Mexico Republican, and Sam Nunn, the Georgia Democrat, are co-chairmen of the Strengthening America Commission, whose report, if implemented, would give America much more change than Bill Clinton, the ''candidate of change,'' has contemplated.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Independence Day means steamed crabs for many Marylanders, but the outlook for celebrating the nation's birthday with a heaping tableful of locally caught crustaceans is as iffy as the weather of late. Despite a bumper crop of crabs tallied in the Chesapeake Bay during last winter's survey, that bounty has yet to show up at local docks or seafood outlets, watermen and dealers report. The big crab houses and restaurants always stock their coolers with crabs shipped up from Louisiana or Texas, and some seafood businesses have augmented the local catch with crabs trucked in from down the bay or North Carolina.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
I sympathize with letter writer Arthur Lapenotiere ("In Westboro Baptist case, court upheld the law," Oct. 10), who wrote this in defense of the Supreme Court's ruling, quoting from Justice William J. Brennan, "If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive. " Oh, what a noble sentiment. If only it were true. Think back to another recent ruling that involved the same principle, Morse v. Frederick (and the infamous "Bong hits for Jesus" sign)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 27, 2010
If you're willing to let bygones be bygones, it'll be fun to see Miguel Tejada back in an Orioles uniform this spring. It'll also be fun to see Nolan Reimold walking without a limp and Nick Markakis clean-shaven again and all of them working out in a spring training facility that wasn't built when their parents were still in short pants. It'll be fun because it's always fun in February and March, when the losses don't hurt that much and it's still possible to at least imagine a scenario in which the Orioles can end their ugly string of 12 straight losing seasons.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Drivers on the new Intercounty Connector highway linking the Washington suburbs could be paying among the nation's highest tolls, as the Maryland Transportation Authority approved Thursday a plan to charge two-axle vehicles up to 35 cents per mile during peak travel times. Brushing aside complaints that its proposed tolls were too steep, the nine-member authority that oversees Maryland's bridges, tunnels and toll roads approved a variable rate plan for the ICC with few changes from what it had unveiled in September, though it did set a new "overnight" rate as low as 10 cents per mile.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | July 17, 2008
My computer is about two years old. I added 1 gigabyte of RAM so I would be able to play newer games on it. Normally, I use it all day for gaming, Web surfing and word processing. The internal fan is quiet after startup, but after some use it sometimes suddenly becomes loud. It may only stay loud for a few minutes or until the computer is powered down. - Keegan Nesbitt Many computers have fans that change speed based on the heat inside the computer. While it's possible something is wrong with your computer or fan, odds are things are operating just as they should.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | June 22, 2008
We have a problem. "I have an annuity purchased for me by an investment broker at my bank," a reader wrote. "I'm having difficulty understanding what this is. He has since left the bank and his successor isn't much help. The money is tied up for four years with a 9 percent early withdrawal penalty." From another reader: "My husband and I are being pressured to buy a variable annuity. I was told we'd never lose our principal, but I am really scared. We have to do this in about two weeks."
NEWS
December 9, 1995
THE FRIENDSHIP between Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Kenneth J. Strong goes back 30 years, when they were both in the Lancers Boys Club. That's why it was surprising when the mayor stood silent while Mr. Strong -- for 18 months head of the Bureau of Solid Waste -- was fired in November by Director of Public Works George W. Balog.Mr. Balog's initial lack of candor about why Mr. Strong was fired fueled political speculation as to why Mr. Schmoke didn't stand up for his pal. Further explanation has been provided by public works fiscal officer Robert J. Elliott, who says Mr. Strong had spent his entire annual overtime budget of $800,000 in three months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | June 25, 2000
There's something about the letter X. It marks the spot, defines a generation, keeps Mulder and Scully busy, labels superhero mutants and warns of sexual content. It even made headlines recently, when two hard drives chock full of nuclear confidences were reported missing from Los Alamos National Laboratory. They disappeared from its top-secret "X Division," where nuclear weapons are designed. X is mysterious, it's a highly sensitive unknown, it's hip, and it's been that way for centuries.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2008
So many things can go wrong. That's the reality for any given horse in any given race. Maybe he's burned out from training too hard. Maybe he has a sore hoof. Maybe it's raining and he doesn't like the mud. Maybe he stumbles coming out of the gate or another horse bangs into him. Maybe his jockey doesn't devise the right tactical plan. Maybe he's simply tired compared with the rest of the field. Multiply those possibilities over three races packed with the best 3-year-old thoroughbreds in the world and it's easy to understand why we haven't had a Triple Crown winner in 30 years.
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