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NEWS
August 26, 1996
PAPER OR PLASTIC? Not at the supermarket checkout, but at Carroll County school cafeterias this fall where parents can use credit cards to pay for a year's lunches in advance, and get a discount. (But no refunds for missed meals.)Paper money (and coins) will still be accepted, but Carroll officials expect the credit-card charge to win favor, as it has in Howard County for eight years. Some jurisdictions, such as Baltimore County, offer prepaid debit-cards for a set number of lunches. But more significant changes are in store for Carroll County schools when more than 26,000 youngsters return to the classroom today.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
It started when a few people on the Carroll side of Mount Airy noticed some Maryland license plates that commemorated Frederick County schools.So Margaret Potito and Carole Carr, two Mount Airy parents, looked into it and found they could do the same for Carroll County, and raise up to $400,000 for computer technology for schools in the county.They're taking names from people who want to sign up for a commemorative license plate issued by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.The tags will have the Carroll County Schools logo -- a red one-room schoolhouse with a flag -- and the letters QS, for "quality schools" or "quality students."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1996
Pam Erisman cannot drive anywhere without being asked: "Are you Cal Ripken's wife?"The reason for the question is obvious. The front and rear bumpers of her 1995 Nissan Altima bear the license plates "CAL 8."Adding to the confusion is that, like Kelly Ripken, Ms. Erisman, 26, is an attractive blonde who adores the 35-year-old Orioles shortstop. But Ms. Erisman lacks two things that Mrs. Ripken has: height (Ms. Erisman stands 5 feet 9 inches, about three inches shorter than Mrs. Ripken) and the wedding ring.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | October 29, 1995
What fun to find Vanity Fair refraining from its usual star worship. The gusher runs dry for Ralph Fiennes, the pale British actor who played such a convincing Nazi sadist in "Schindler's List." During his two-hour interview in the November issue, Mr. Fiennes is a model of chilly reserve: "Not that one expected a teddy bear," writes Leslie Bennetts. "Maybe an infinitesimal bit of charm, perhaps -- would that be too much to ask?" Indeed, Mr. Fiennes declines eye contact with the reporter, who is left to theorize about the murky depths lurking beneath the 32-year-old actor's "aristocratic exterior," depths that have electrified his performances -- in "Hamlet" onstage, in Robert Redford's "Quiz Show," in the futuristic "Strange Days."
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | August 20, 1995
Vanity Fair has joined the star-of-the-month club. Like Rolling Stone and other publications surrendering to the time-lapse 1990s, VF is now willing to lend its cover to ephemeral celebrities like Courtney Love, Keanu Reeves, Brad Pitt and Nicole Kidman. It no longer caters solely to the superstar set. For the September issue, Sandra Bullock is flashing her crocodile smile in the front window -- an appropriate reaction to being dubbed "Golden Girl" and "America's Sweetheart" after only three ordinary movies, "Speed," "While You Were Sleeping" and "The Net."
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | May 21, 1995
Recently, I vowed never again to muse on Courtney Love in this column. The punky grunge diva has been iconized by every popular magazine this side of Seattle since she became a power widow. There was nothing left to say. OK, but I can't resist an angelic Miss World on the cover of June's Vanity Fair, the same magazine that accused her of shooting heroin when pregnant with daughter Frances Bean.Strangely, the new VF contains not a single mention of the 1992 article, which Ms. Love has viciously and repeatedly attacked as untrue, claiming it robbed her of all her happiness.
FEATURES
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,Los Angeles Times | March 20, 1995
If women in Hollywood have made any inroads into what has always been a man's world -- and empirical evidence says they have -- you certainly wouldn't know it by picking up the latest copy of Vanity Fair.Outraged industry folks -- males as well as females -- say the magazine's current special issue on Hollywood is sexist and demeaning to women, who are largely depicted in suggestive high-fashion undergarments, or high-fashion designer-wear made to look like undergarments.A group photo of top screenwriters overlooks women altogether.
NEWS
March 8, 1995
POLICE LOG* Ellicott City: 3800 block of Palmetto Court: Police said a woman was awakened by barking dogs when someone tried to pry open her home's rear doorearly Saturday.* Elkridge: 6600 block of Old Washington Road: A white 1990 Nissan 300ZX with vanity tags LADYTEE was stolen late Friday or early Saturday, police said.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | December 26, 1994
he is first in line whenstores open, to dip hands/!in the pool of ties on sale.He stands handling the silks,1#harmonious as a musical score,colors introduced, repeated,0`cadenced in shirt, tie, suit.In hot July his business look%is crisp as winterwhen he bargain hunts. In him4&there seems no vanity, no mirror-lure, no sense of audience,1#no peacock's pride -- just theannually augmented pleasure of1#a present to and from himself.
NEWS
December 22, 1994
POLICE LOG* Harper's Choice: 5400 block of El Camino: A blue 1987 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer with Maryland vanity tags BARCODE was stolen Sunday, police said.* Wilde Lake: 10500 block of Twin Rivers Road: A white 1990 Pontiac Grand Am with Maryland vanity tags HZGRACE was stolen Sunday, police said.
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