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NEWS
July 30, 2010
Despite complaints about the new Maryland license plates that have a War of 1812 theme, sales of vanity plates increased after the design was introduced in mid-June, the Motor Vehicle Administration says. MVA spokesman Buel Young said that from June 14 to June 30, the state sold 454 vanity plates with a design evoking the image of the 1814 bombardment of Fort McHenry. He said that compares with 334 vanity plates sold during the May 14-30 period, when the old black-on-white design was in use. The 1812 design is scheduled to be used as the default template for regular and vanity plates through 2015, when the state would revert to the former design.
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NEWS
By Annie Middlestadt | January 6, 2013
When I heard the news that Ray Lewis was retiring at the end of this season, I cried. Ray Lewis has an emotional hold on this community, state, and fan base - and on my family. He has been, for 17 years, a leader, an inspiration, a sign of hope. A constant. I was a daddy's girl, but inside there was always a yearning to be one of the boys. I was the middle child, a "rose between two thorns" as my mother said, with a brother on either side. I was always wanting to be one of the guys but never quite fitting in. When the Ravens came to town, that all changed.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Want to express yourself on a license plate? Go ahead. The state will gladly take your $50 per year. You can't say any old thing, though. The Motor Vehicle Administration has cataloged more than 4,000 words, phrases and letter-number combinations it won't put on a tag. The agency's Objectionable Plate List, as it's called, is a compendium of vulgarities, obscenities and other no-no's aimed at keeping tags out of the gutter. The Baltimore Sun requested the information last week, hoping to share what the MVA doesn't want you to see on the road.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Want to express yourself on a license plate? Go ahead. The state will gladly take your $50 per year. You can't say any old thing, though. The Motor Vehicle Administration has cataloged more than 4,000 words, phrases and letter-number combinations it won't put on a tag. The agency's Objectionable Plate List, as it's called, is a compendium of vulgarities, obscenities and other no-no's aimed at keeping tags out of the gutter. The Baltimore Sun requested the information last week, hoping to share what the MVA doesn't want you to see on the road.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 23, 1991
WHILE LIVING in another state, I used to see this woman driving around in a red sports car with vanity license plates that read: 2COOL.With her tinted aviator shades and frosted hair, I thought she looked, well, fairly cool. But not too cool, or even 2COOL, although I tend to be somewhat conservative about these things.What intrigued me is how the woman arrived at the conclusion that she was too cool. Did someone tell her she was too cool? Was she at a party, for instance, doing a hilarious send-up of Madonna when one of her friends, giddy from a couple of screwdrivers, cried out: "Margie (or whatever her name was)
NEWS
February 27, 1997
TAKEN TO ITS ultimate absurdity, U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin's ruling that Maryland officials cannot deny groups special vehicle license plates could make it impossible to stop citizens from requesting profanities on their tags. In fact, Judge Smalkin's decision could even make it illegal for the state to assign alphanumeric license plates to car owners because it would violate the right to free speech.The judge's decision equating an auto license plate with free speech stretches credulity.
FEATURES
By Ricky Young and Ricky Young,Orange County Register | January 20, 1994
A haiku has 17 syllables. A sonnet has 14 lines. And a California innovator has come up with a way to pack literature into an even tighter limit: seven letters.GADZOOX!Daniel Nussbaum of Silver Lake, Calif., has written a novelty book using nothing but vanity plates.In it, he retells 24 stories, from "LILRED RIDING HOOD" to "ROMYOH ANNDE JULYET.""All of these stories exist in California," Mr. Nussbaum said. "They're just scattered all over the freeways, and not very organized."Most of us idle along, trying clumsily to decipher messages in one license plate at a time.
NEWS
By Annie Middlestadt | January 6, 2013
When I heard the news that Ray Lewis was retiring at the end of this season, I cried. Ray Lewis has an emotional hold on this community, state, and fan base - and on my family. He has been, for 17 years, a leader, an inspiration, a sign of hope. A constant. I was a daddy's girl, but inside there was always a yearning to be one of the boys. I was the middle child, a "rose between two thorns" as my mother said, with a brother on either side. I was always wanting to be one of the guys but never quite fitting in. When the Ravens came to town, that all changed.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
The "XTRRVNU" vanity license plate mocked up on Sunday's front page ("Raising revenue," March 27) is impossible to actually get because the War of 1812 design has replaced the classic black on white Maryland tag. One of the reasons I asked Del. Keiffer Mitchell to introduce legislation to restore the use of the classic tag for personalized plates (HB 697) is that vanity messages of five to seven characters obscure the Star Spangled Banner. (By the way, the heron on the Chesapeake Bay tag goes missing in action when the plates are personalized.)
NEWS
August 26, 1996
PAPER OR PLASTIC? Not at the supermarket checkout, but at Carroll County school cafeterias this fall where parents can use credit cards to pay for a year's lunches in advance, and get a discount. (But no refunds for missed meals.)Paper money (and coins) will still be accepted, but Carroll officials expect the credit-card charge to win favor, as it has in Howard County for eight years. Some jurisdictions, such as Baltimore County, offer prepaid debit-cards for a set number of lunches. But more significant changes are in store for Carroll County schools when more than 26,000 youngsters return to the classroom today.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
The "XTRRVNU" vanity license plate mocked up on Sunday's front page ("Raising revenue," March 27) is impossible to actually get because the War of 1812 design has replaced the classic black on white Maryland tag. One of the reasons I asked Del. Keiffer Mitchell to introduce legislation to restore the use of the classic tag for personalized plates (HB 697) is that vanity messages of five to seven characters obscure the Star Spangled Banner. (By the way, the heron on the Chesapeake Bay tag goes missing in action when the plates are personalized.)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
A House committee went to work Friday on rewriting portions of Gov. Martin O'Malley's $14 billion budget proposal, rolling back the governor's most significant cuts by chopping elsewhere and raising roughly $67 million in fees. Lawmakers worked into the night on a plan produced by the Democratic House leadership that would increase the cost of titling cars and trucks, registering land records and getting a vanity license plate. The extra revenue would go to three groups that have objected most to O'Malley's spending plan: the counties, state workers and school systems.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
Despite complaints about the new Maryland license plates that have a War of 1812 theme, sales of vanity plates increased after the design was introduced in mid-June, the Motor Vehicle Administration says. MVA spokesman Buel Young said that from June 14 to June 30, the state sold 454 vanity plates with a design evoking the image of the 1814 bombardment of Fort McHenry. He said that compares with 334 vanity plates sold during the May 14-30 period, when the old black-on-white design was in use. The 1812 design is scheduled to be used as the default template for regular and vanity plates through 2015, when the state would revert to the former design.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2003
What are proud Baltimoreans to do when there's no space left on their cars' bumpers among all those "Believe" and "I City Life" stickers? Now they can make a more permanent statement by making their vehicles "rolling billboards" for the city with Live Baltimore's new "I City Life" license plates. Unveiled last week, the new vanity plates go beyond ephemeral displays of civic pride such as bumper stickers or T-shirts - but could also make a more permanent dent in your wallet. Unlike the ubiquitous "I City Life" bumper stickers, offered free to city ambassadors who support Live Baltimore and to passers-by at city events, the license plates are a fund-raising tool.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
TAKEN TO ITS ultimate absurdity, U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin's ruling that Maryland officials cannot deny groups special vehicle license plates could make it impossible to stop citizens from requesting profanities on their tags. In fact, Judge Smalkin's decision could even make it illegal for the state to assign alphanumeric license plates to car owners because it would violate the right to free speech.The judge's decision equating an auto license plate with free speech stretches credulity.
NEWS
August 26, 1996
PAPER OR PLASTIC? Not at the supermarket checkout, but at Carroll County school cafeterias this fall where parents can use credit cards to pay for a year's lunches in advance, and get a discount. (But no refunds for missed meals.)Paper money (and coins) will still be accepted, but Carroll officials expect the credit-card charge to win favor, as it has in Howard County for eight years. Some jurisdictions, such as Baltimore County, offer prepaid debit-cards for a set number of lunches. But more significant changes are in store for Carroll County schools when more than 26,000 youngsters return to the classroom today.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
A House committee went to work Friday on rewriting portions of Gov. Martin O'Malley's $14 billion budget proposal, rolling back the governor's most significant cuts by chopping elsewhere and raising roughly $67 million in fees. Lawmakers worked into the night on a plan produced by the Democratic House leadership that would increase the cost of titling cars and trucks, registering land records and getting a vanity license plate. The extra revenue would go to three groups that have objected most to O'Malley's spending plan: the counties, state workers and school systems.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2003
What are proud Baltimoreans to do when there's no space left on their cars' bumpers among all those "Believe" and "I City Life" stickers? Now they can make a more permanent statement by making their vehicles "rolling billboards" for the city with Live Baltimore's new "I City Life" license plates. Unveiled last week, the new vanity plates go beyond ephemeral displays of civic pride such as bumper stickers or T-shirts - but could also make a more permanent dent in your wallet. Unlike the ubiquitous "I City Life" bumper stickers, offered free to city ambassadors who support Live Baltimore and to passers-by at city events, the license plates are a fund-raising tool.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
It started when a few people on the Carroll side of Mount Airy noticed some Maryland license plates that commemorated Frederick County schools.So Margaret Potito and Carole Carr, two Mount Airy parents, looked into it and found they could do the same for Carroll County, and raise up to $400,000 for computer technology for schools in the county.They're taking names from people who want to sign up for a commemorative license plate issued by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.The tags will have the Carroll County Schools logo -- a red one-room schoolhouse with a flag -- and the letters QS, for "quality schools" or "quality students."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1996
Pam Erisman cannot drive anywhere without being asked: "Are you Cal Ripken's wife?"The reason for the question is obvious. The front and rear bumpers of her 1995 Nissan Altima bear the license plates "CAL 8."Adding to the confusion is that, like Kelly Ripken, Ms. Erisman, 26, is an attractive blonde who adores the 35-year-old Orioles shortstop. But Ms. Erisman lacks two things that Mrs. Ripken has: height (Ms. Erisman stands 5 feet 9 inches, about three inches shorter than Mrs. Ripken) and the wedding ring.
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