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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Rick Hite, who retired from the Baltimore Police Department in 2010, will be named the chief of the Indianapolis Police Department, the Indianapolis Star is reporting .  Hite left Baltimore while holding a position of a community and youth liaison, and for years had been active in the department's Vanguard Justice Society, an organization representing the agency's black officers.  Hite became interim chief in Indianapolis eight months ago....
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Rick Hite, who retired from the Baltimore Police Department in 2010, will be named the chief of the Indianapolis Police Department, the Indianapolis Star is reporting .  Hite left Baltimore while holding a position of a community and youth liaison, and for years had been active in the department's Vanguard Justice Society, an organization representing the agency's black officers.  Hite became interim chief in Indianapolis eight months ago....
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Irvin Bradley, a decorated retired Baltimore City homicide detective who had worked on some of the city's most publicized cases, died of heart disease Wednesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The West Baltimore resident was 55. A native of Sumter, S.C., Irvin C. Bradley moved to Baltimore as a youngster. He was a 1974 Southwestern High School graduate. He attended Morgan State University. He joined the Baltimore Police Department in early 1979 and was assigned to the Southern District, working in patrol, drug enforcement and vice, as well as with the Police Athletic League.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Irvin Bradley, a decorated retired Baltimore City homicide detective who had worked on some of the city's most publicized cases, died of heart disease Wednesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The West Baltimore resident was 55. A native of Sumter, S.C., Irvin C. Bradley moved to Baltimore as a youngster. He was a 1974 Southwestern High School graduate. He attended Morgan State University. He joined the Baltimore Police Department in early 1979 and was assigned to the Southern District, working in patrol, drug enforcement and vice, as well as with the Police Athletic League.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris shook up the highest ranks of his department yesterday, promoting 17 commanders and shifting two others to new jobs. Norris, who declined to be interviewed, issued a statement saying that he "periodically reviews the command structure, looks at the big picture - crime and other factors - and makes changes accordingly." The promotions will take effect in coming days, officials said. Col. John McEntee, who heads the patrol division, will become deputy commissioner of operations and will oversee the day-to-day running of the department's crime-fighting strategies.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 16, 1996
Baltimore Police Maj. Wendell M. France, head of the homicide unit, has been elected chairman of the National Black Police Association, which represents 35,000 officers in 35 states.Major France, a 26-year veteran who is commander of the crimes against persons section, will serve two years as chairman, a job he will perform in his spare time. He is a past president of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents black Baltimore officers.The police association was organized in 1972 to create a network among minority officers.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | July 30, 2008
The head of the Baltimore Police Department's internal investigations division will retire shortly, said Sterling Clifford, a police spokesman. Col. Walter J. Tuffy, who has been with the department for almost 27 years, will continue in his post until a new commander is named, Clifford said. In March, the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents black officers, called for the resignation of Tuffy and two others. The group spoke out after a black sergeant was charged internally with raping a woman in a police station, though he was far away on vacation.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 1996
A group that represents black city police officers expressed concern yesterday that splitting the Field Operations Bureau between two commanders, with those they supervise falling along racial lines, could result in unequal police service to poor, black communities."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Members of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents black city police officers, criticized the organization's leadership because several candidates were excluded yesterday from the group's elections. "We have dues-paying members who are puzzled and don't know what is going on," said Detective Irvin Bradley, a former president of the group. "I'm in disbelief. The members are highly upset. ... We wanted a fair election." Leaders of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents about 600 black city police officers, declined to say why they deleted the names of three outspoken members from ballots.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1997
The Vanguard Justice Society, an organization of black officers, has kicked out Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier and is holding a vigil tomorrow to pray for his ouster as chief.Frazier's membership was revoked by unanimous vote at the group's general membership meeting May 22, based on "domestic spying, unfair practices and failure to recognize freedom of assembly and free speech," said Sgt. Teresa E. Cunningham, president of the society."We're going to be praying for the police commissioner to do the right thing, which is to be fair," Cunningham said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris shook up the highest ranks of his department yesterday, promoting 17 commanders and shifting two others to new jobs. Norris, who declined to be interviewed, issued a statement saying that he "periodically reviews the command structure, looks at the big picture - crime and other factors - and makes changes accordingly." The promotions will take effect in coming days, officials said. Col. John McEntee, who heads the patrol division, will become deputy commissioner of operations and will oversee the day-to-day running of the department's crime-fighting strategies.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
Several African-American city police officers and state Sen. Clarence M. Mitchell IV held a news conference outside City Hall yesterday, criticizing Police Department efforts in hiring and promoting black officers. Two hundred feet away, more than three dozen African-American officers -- including several commanders, the deputy police commissioner, the president of the Vanguard Justice Society and president of the city police union -- held a counter-protest, saying the situation in the department has improved during the past two years.
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