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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
MEDINAH, Ill. -- He has become more recognized, whether it's on the streets of Paris or the fairways of Medinah Country Club here at the 81st PGA Championship. He is now well-known, though it's for losing last month's British Open at Carnoustie rather for anything he has accomplished in his career.But don't look at Jean Van de Velde as a tragic figure, the Bill Buckner of golf.The 33-year-old Frenchman certainly doesn't."Maybe it's my temperament, I don't know," Van de Velde said yesterday.
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By Chuck Culpepper and Chuck Culpepper,Los Angeles Times | July 23, 2007
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- Even with its meandering Barry Burn, ravenous pot bunkers and ball-swallowing rough, the 18th hole at Carnoustie needs a makeover. It needs curtains, a marquee and ushers. It's not a golf hole; it's a theater. Eight years after Jean Van de Velde took off his shoes and waded unforgettably into the Barry Burn on his way to an unthinkable triple-bogey, the hole called "Home" staged a fiendish twist in the plot yesterday. It had this 35-year-old Irishman, Padraig Harrington, dunking two balls into the creek to blow a one-shot lead so graphically that even Harrington's wife thought of Van de Velde.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 17, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- Maybe it's ludicrous. Maybe golf isn't meant to be played on a course where the rough is thigh deep, the fairways are as narrow as tennis courts, and the wind roars like a rush-hour subway.But it doesn't matter. The British Open at Carnoustie is setting up as a classic test of golfing survival.Yesterday, unheralded Frenchman Jean Van de Velde showed the best golfers in the world how to take the nasty out of Carnoustie.Aiming for pars and hoping for the best, Van de Velde's 3-under 68 gave him the 36-hole lead at 1-over-par 143.Lying second at 144 was another international mystery guest, Argentina's Angel Cabrera, who shot 69.But it's the players just off the pace who provided the tournament with an air of anticipation even as the diabolical winds whipped off the Firth of Tay.Sweden's Jesper Parnevik, twice a runner-up and battling hay fever so awful he wandered around with pieces of paper shoved up his nose, was at 145.Tiger Woods and Greg Norman were tied at 146, with Sweden's Patrik Sjoland, immaculately placed to make a charge for the silver claret jug in tomorrow's closing round.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
You can argue for hours about the singular flavors in a spectacular single malt whiskey or a good glass of wine. Vodka is different. This drink is judged not so much by its flavor as by its lack of flavor. Reasonably sophisticated palates can tell the difference between a cheap vodka and a beautiful, silken shot of clear spirits that deserves to be quaffed all by itself from an ice-cold shot glass. But most bartenders will tell you that vodka's surge in popularity in recent years can be attributed more to its qualities as an empty canvas than to all those new premium brands on the market.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 19, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- It ended in the gloom and rain, with the lilt of bagpipes wafting over the 18th green, with the crowd singing "The Flower Scotland" and with an unlikely champion finally holding aloft a silver claret jug and shouting, "I'm a local boy! Let's hear it!' "Scotland's Paul Lawrie won a three-way playoff and claimed the British Open at Carnoustie yesterday, capping a moment of golfing drama that nearly defied belief.This was the storybook finish that nobody expected, a Scot winning on home turf.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Jean Van de Velde came to last year's British Open at Carnoustie a virtual unknown, a European Tour journeyman whose claim to fame was his lone victory at the 1993 Masters - the Roma Masters. Van de Velde still only has one win in 13 years as a pro, but it was his agonizing and widely second-guessed defeat at last year's Open that raised the profile of the 34-year-old Frenchman. Who can forget Van de Velde blowing a three-shot lead on the final hole of regulation with a triple-bogey 7, then losing in a four-hole playoff?
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 18, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- This isn't supposed to happen at a British Open. Qualifiers from France don't just show up, slam home 70-foot birdie putts and threaten to lap the field.But yesterday, Jean Van de Velde continued what can only be called a European golf dream, holding his nerve and his lead through the third round of the British Open at windy and treacherous Carnoustie.Van de Velde, the midway leader, shot a 1-under 70 and emerged at even-par 213 to carry a five-stroke advantage into today's final round.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
GULLANE, Scotland - Will Jean-Francois Remesy of France become the Jean Van de Velde of the 131st British Open at Muirfield? Or, even better, will he become the Arnaud Massy? Remesy, 38, hopes to emulate his friend and countryman Van de Velde in some ways, but Massy in one significant way - becoming the first Frenchman to win the Open since Massy in 1907. With a 3-under-par 68 in yesterday's opening round that tied him for second, Remesy took a significant step in both directions. Given the history he has learned from Massy's victory - also the only one in the Open by a Frenchman - and the perspective he has learned from Van de Velde's cruel defeat at Carnoustie in 1999, Remesy is patiently awaiting his opportunity.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
You can argue for hours about the singular flavors in a spectacular single malt whiskey or a good glass of wine. Vodka is different. This drink is judged not so much by its flavor as by its lack of flavor. Reasonably sophisticated palates can tell the difference between a cheap vodka and a beautiful, silken shot of clear spirits that deserves to be quaffed all by itself from an ice-cold shot glass. But most bartenders will tell you that vodka's surge in popularity in recent years can be attributed more to its qualities as an empty canvas than to all those new premium brands on the market.
SPORTS
By Chuck Culpepper and Chuck Culpepper,Los Angeles Times | July 23, 2007
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- Even with its meandering Barry Burn, ravenous pot bunkers and ball-swallowing rough, the 18th hole at Carnoustie needs a makeover. It needs curtains, a marquee and ushers. It's not a golf hole; it's a theater. Eight years after Jean Van de Velde took off his shoes and waded unforgettably into the Barry Burn on his way to an unthinkable triple-bogey, the hole called "Home" staged a fiendish twist in the plot yesterday. It had this 35-year-old Irishman, Padraig Harrington, dunking two balls into the creek to blow a one-shot lead so graphically that even Harrington's wife thought of Van de Velde.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
GULLANE, Scotland - Will Jean-Francois Remesy of France become the Jean Van de Velde of the 131st British Open at Muirfield? Or, even better, will he become the Arnaud Massy? Remesy, 38, hopes to emulate his friend and countryman Van de Velde in some ways, but Massy in one significant way - becoming the first Frenchman to win the Open since Massy in 1907. With a 3-under-par 68 in yesterday's opening round that tied him for second, Remesy took a significant step in both directions. Given the history he has learned from Massy's victory - also the only one in the Open by a Frenchman - and the perspective he has learned from Van de Velde's cruel defeat at Carnoustie in 1999, Remesy is patiently awaiting his opportunity.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
CAPTION: Into the swing: Retief Goosen saved par after errant shots on the first three holes, later building a five-shot lead that allowed him enough breathing room so that a final-hole bogey still gave him a par-70 and the title. Unlucky 13: Mark Brooks finds trouble in a 13th-hole bunker. Bogeys on the ninth and 10th holes helped put him at a five-shot disadvantage. TULSA, Okla. - Some professional golfers have needed months, even years, to find redemption. Some never find it at all, chasing those demons of chances blown and championships lost for the rest of their careers.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Talk about getting your feet wet at your first British Open. Notah Begay III did so yesterday on the Old Course- figuratively - and in the Swilken Burn - literally. Making his debut in the 129th Open, Begay found himself in the lead at 7-under through 16 holes. After hitting his first two shots on the par-4 17th in the rough, Begay found himself in the water. With his ball sitting up and his lead coming down, Begay decided to have a little fun. "It was fun getting in the burn," Begay said later.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Jean Van de Velde came to last year's British Open at Carnoustie a virtual unknown, a European Tour journeyman whose claim to fame was his lone victory at the 1993 Masters - the Roma Masters. Van de Velde still only has one win in 13 years as a pro, but it was his agonizing and widely second-guessed defeat at last year's Open that raised the profile of the 34-year-old Frenchman. Who can forget Van de Velde blowing a three-shot lead on the final hole of regulation with a triple-bogey 7, then losing in a four-hole playoff?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
MEDINAH, Ill. -- He has become more recognized, whether it's on the streets of Paris or the fairways of Medinah Country Club here at the 81st PGA Championship. He is now well-known, though it's for losing last month's British Open at Carnoustie rather for anything he has accomplished in his career.But don't look at Jean Van de Velde as a tragic figure, the Bill Buckner of golf.The 33-year-old Frenchman certainly doesn't."Maybe it's my temperament, I don't know," Van de Velde said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 19, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- It ended in the gloom and rain, with the lilt of bagpipes wafting over the 18th green, with the crowd singing "The Flower Scotland" and with an unlikely champion finally holding aloft a silver claret jug and shouting, "I'm a local boy! Let's hear it!' "Scotland's Paul Lawrie won a three-way playoff and claimed the British Open at Carnoustie yesterday, capping a moment of golfing drama that nearly defied belief.This was the storybook finish that nobody expected, a Scot winning on home turf.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Talk about getting your feet wet at your first British Open. Notah Begay III did so yesterday on the Old Course- figuratively - and in the Swilken Burn - literally. Making his debut in the 129th Open, Begay found himself in the lead at 7-under through 16 holes. After hitting his first two shots on the par-4 17th in the rough, Begay found himself in the water. With his ball sitting up and his lead coming down, Begay decided to have a little fun. "It was fun getting in the burn," Begay said later.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
CAPTION: Into the swing: Retief Goosen saved par after errant shots on the first three holes, later building a five-shot lead that allowed him enough breathing room so that a final-hole bogey still gave him a par-70 and the title. Unlucky 13: Mark Brooks finds trouble in a 13th-hole bunker. Bogeys on the ninth and 10th holes helped put him at a five-shot disadvantage. TULSA, Okla. - Some professional golfers have needed months, even years, to find redemption. Some never find it at all, chasing those demons of chances blown and championships lost for the rest of their careers.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 18, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- This isn't supposed to happen at a British Open. Qualifiers from France don't just show up, slam home 70-foot birdie putts and threaten to lap the field.But yesterday, Jean Van de Velde continued what can only be called a European golf dream, holding his nerve and his lead through the third round of the British Open at windy and treacherous Carnoustie.Van de Velde, the midway leader, shot a 1-under 70 and emerged at even-par 213 to carry a five-stroke advantage into today's final round.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 17, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- Maybe it's ludicrous. Maybe golf isn't meant to be played on a course where the rough is thigh deep, the fairways are as narrow as tennis courts, and the wind roars like a rush-hour subway.But it doesn't matter. The British Open at Carnoustie is setting up as a classic test of golfing survival.Yesterday, unheralded Frenchman Jean Van de Velde showed the best golfers in the world how to take the nasty out of Carnoustie.Aiming for pars and hoping for the best, Van de Velde's 3-under 68 gave him the 36-hole lead at 1-over-par 143.Lying second at 144 was another international mystery guest, Argentina's Angel Cabrera, who shot 69.But it's the players just off the pace who provided the tournament with an air of anticipation even as the diabolical winds whipped off the Firth of Tay.Sweden's Jesper Parnevik, twice a runner-up and battling hay fever so awful he wandered around with pieces of paper shoved up his nose, was at 145.Tiger Woods and Greg Norman were tied at 146, with Sweden's Patrik Sjoland, immaculately placed to make a charge for the silver claret jug in tomorrow's closing round.
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