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By Kellie Woodhouse | August 30, 2011
In the living room of his Ellicott City home, Christopher Shih sits with his legs curled beneath him on a beige leather love seat. Relaxed in a pair of shorts and a T-shirt, he speaks humbly of his accomplishments as an amateur pianist. In the kitchen Shih's two eldest daughters, Nina and Elena, sing and play, and upstairs his youngest daughter, Sonia, sleeps. “During the six months prior to the competition, I essentially have no time,” Shih says, and then stops mid-thought after hearing a roar of laughter from one of his daughters.
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By Kellie Woodhouse | August 30, 2011
In the living room of his Ellicott City home, Christopher Shih sits with his legs curled beneath him on a beige leather love seat. Relaxed in a pair of shorts and a T-shirt, he speaks humbly of his accomplishments as an amateur pianist. In the kitchen Shih's two eldest daughters, Nina and Elena, sing and play, and upstairs his youngest daughter, Sonia, sleeps. “During the six months prior to the competition, I essentially have no time,” Shih says, and then stops mid-thought after hearing a roar of laughter from one of his daughters.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2004
An expert in waste-water treatment, two pathologists, a tennis coach, an acupuncturist, the wife of a Canadian senator, a flight attendant, and a computer network administrator from Baltimore will be among the contestants in the Van Cliburn Foundation's Fourth International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning May 31. "It's a great opportunity to meet other people crazy enough to be doing what you're doing," says...
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 6, 2005
FORT WORTH -- Every four years, optimists, realists and skeptics alike gather here to witness an intense rite not entirely unlike the great cattle drives that once rolled through this friendly city. A strong stock of eager, tightly focused musicians parade past a seasoned jury, an enthusiastic public and a sizable contingent of the domestic and foreign press as they take their best shot at fame and fortune in the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, probably the best known and most closely watched event of its kind in the world.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 6, 2005
FORT WORTH -- Every four years, optimists, realists and skeptics alike gather here to witness an intense rite not entirely unlike the great cattle drives that once rolled through this friendly city. A strong stock of eager, tightly focused musicians parade past a seasoned jury, an enthusiastic public and a sizable contingent of the domestic and foreign press as they take their best shot at fame and fortune in the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, probably the best known and most closely watched event of its kind in the world.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 17, 2001
When a gangly young Texan pianist named Van Cliburn won the Tchaikovsky International Competition in Moscow in 1958, in the midst of the Cold War, he became an instant American hero. The irony of his career is that he couldn't top that moment in history; within a decade, questions were being raised about limited repertoire and limited interpretive imagination. He never really lost his status as a legend; he just had trouble living up to it. The same has been said of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which he founded in 1962.
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By Allan Kozinn and Allan Kozinn,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE $$TC | March 21, 1996
NEW YORK - About 2,000 admirers of the music of Morton Gould filled Carnegie Hall's parquet and the lower two balconies yesterday afternoon to pay tribute to this eclectic composer of symphonic works, Broadway musicals, ballets and film scores.The program, called "A Celebration of Morton Gould," was presented by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, of which Gould had been president for eight years. Gould died Feb. 21 at age 82.Gould's successor, Marilyn Bergman, presided over the tribute, a nearly two-hour program that included performances that touched on the enormous range of styles Gould's music encompassed, as well as recollections by friends and colleagues, and videotape of Gould himself.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1999
WHEN MOST of us think of young, female athletes on ice, we visualize sequined costumes and figure skates.That image will have to change, said Rene Weisz of Severna Park, who coaches girls hockey."
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By Phil Greenfield | July 28, 1996
"LISTEN TO your heart," I heard people saying.And what my heart was telling me back in the mid-1980s was that I desperately wanted to spend some of my allotted time on this planet as a bona-fide music critic writing for a real, live newspaper.So in October of 1987, I, gulp, submitted an unsolicited review of the Annapolis Symphony's season-opening concert to what was then a daily tabloid called the Anne Arundel County Sun.Andrew Ratner, a compassionate editor with an interest in the arts and a whole lot of space to fill up, was gracious enough to print my lukewarm assessment of the local orchestra's handiwork and, whaddya know!
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By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 26, 2001
The Kennedy Center Honors program is a strange hybrid. Part variety show, part awards program, part pop culture spectacle and national celebration, you might not think the parts would mesh - especially when the recipients range from Hollywood actors to Italian tenors on the same night. But in tonight's 24th annual edition of The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, the disparate parts not only mesh, but they also click, crackle, sizzle, pop and light up the screen with moments of great entertainment and emotion.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2004
An expert in waste-water treatment, two pathologists, a tennis coach, an acupuncturist, the wife of a Canadian senator, a flight attendant, and a computer network administrator from Baltimore will be among the contestants in the Van Cliburn Foundation's Fourth International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning May 31. "It's a great opportunity to meet other people crazy enough to be doing what you're doing," says...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 26, 2001
The Kennedy Center Honors program is a strange hybrid. Part variety show, part awards program, part pop culture spectacle and national celebration, you might not think the parts would mesh - especially when the recipients range from Hollywood actors to Italian tenors on the same night. But in tonight's 24th annual edition of The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, the disparate parts not only mesh, but they also click, crackle, sizzle, pop and light up the screen with moments of great entertainment and emotion.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 17, 2001
When a gangly young Texan pianist named Van Cliburn won the Tchaikovsky International Competition in Moscow in 1958, in the midst of the Cold War, he became an instant American hero. The irony of his career is that he couldn't top that moment in history; within a decade, questions were being raised about limited repertoire and limited interpretive imagination. He never really lost his status as a legend; he just had trouble living up to it. The same has been said of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which he founded in 1962.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1999
WHEN MOST of us think of young, female athletes on ice, we visualize sequined costumes and figure skates.That image will have to change, said Rene Weisz of Severna Park, who coaches girls hockey."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | July 28, 1996
"LISTEN TO your heart," I heard people saying.And what my heart was telling me back in the mid-1980s was that I desperately wanted to spend some of my allotted time on this planet as a bona-fide music critic writing for a real, live newspaper.So in October of 1987, I, gulp, submitted an unsolicited review of the Annapolis Symphony's season-opening concert to what was then a daily tabloid called the Anne Arundel County Sun.Andrew Ratner, a compassionate editor with an interest in the arts and a whole lot of space to fill up, was gracious enough to print my lukewarm assessment of the local orchestra's handiwork and, whaddya know!
FEATURES
By Allan Kozinn and Allan Kozinn,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE $$TC | March 21, 1996
NEW YORK - About 2,000 admirers of the music of Morton Gould filled Carnegie Hall's parquet and the lower two balconies yesterday afternoon to pay tribute to this eclectic composer of symphonic works, Broadway musicals, ballets and film scores.The program, called "A Celebration of Morton Gould," was presented by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, of which Gould had been president for eight years. Gould died Feb. 21 at age 82.Gould's successor, Marilyn Bergman, presided over the tribute, a nearly two-hour program that included performances that touched on the enormous range of styles Gould's music encompassed, as well as recollections by friends and colleagues, and videotape of Gould himself.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | August 21, 1994
" There are no second acts in American lives," F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote. That maxim was put to the test earlier this year when pianist Van Cliburn announced, amid much fanfare, that he would make a comeback tour with the Moscow Philharmonic this summer.That tour -- the pianist's first after more than 16 years of a scarcely interrupted retirement -- ends today at Wolf Trap when Cliburn performs Tchaikovsky's First Concerto. From the beginning of his comeback attempt, however, it was clear that the wisdom of Fitzgerald's remark had been sadly, even pathetically, confirmed.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
* Rildia Bee O'Bryan Cliburn, the mother of Van Cliburn and his only piano teacher until he was 17, died Wednesday in Fort Worth, Texas, after suffering a stroke. She was 97 and lived in Fort Worth.* Artie Glenn, 79, whose song "Crying in the Chapel" became a hit for Elvis Presley in 1965, died of a heart attack July 25 in a Dallas hospital.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | August 21, 1994
" There are no second acts in American lives," F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote. That maxim was put to the test earlier this year when pianist Van Cliburn announced, amid much fanfare, that he would make a comeback tour with the Moscow Philharmonic this summer.That tour -- the pianist's first after more than 16 years of a scarcely interrupted retirement -- ends today at Wolf Trap when Cliburn performs Tchaikovsky's First Concerto. From the beginning of his comeback attempt, however, it was clear that the wisdom of Fitzgerald's remark had been sadly, even pathetically, confirmed.
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