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NEWS
April 17, 2010
Residents of eastern Baltimore County can expect a series of water service interruptions next weekend as officials perform maintenance work on a 12-inch water main valve off Back River Neck Road. To do the work, which begins 9 p.m. Friday, crews from the Baltimore City Department of Public Works will shut down two major water mains in the east county. The resulting water cutoffs are expected to affect residents of the Back River Neck, Middle River, Middleborough, Turkey Point, Hyde Park, Rocky Point, Breezy Point and Marlyn Avenue areas.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
It is a chilling tale of winter, one that in ghost-story fashion begins with a sign that all is not right. Maybe there's a damp spot spreading ominously across a wall, or faint sounds that grow louder and more insistent. "I heard water dripping," Liz Simon-Higgs of Baltimore said, "but mostly what I heard was my water meter spinning. " Similarly, Kacey Gaige heard the tell-tale sound of water on the move in her Severna Park home, "but I wasn't running the laundry. " As she headed into her garage to pick her kids up at school Thursday, the source of the mystery sound was revealed.
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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1996
An employee at the Maryland-Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative in North Laurel was seriously injured Wednesday when a mechanical valve broke and ammonia was blown into his face, Howard County rescue officials said.Dennis Wilson, 53, of Cordova in Talbot County, was in the intensive care burn unit of Washington Hospital Center yesterday. He was being treated for respiratory complications and severe burns to his head and face. A hospital spokeswoman said he was in good condition.Rescue officials said Mr. Wilson was working on a ladder at the milk plant in the 8300 block of Leishear Road when the accident occurred.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Passersby on Falls Road may catch a quick glimpse of what looks like a misplaced limestone mausoleum sitting atop a slight grassy berm in front of the Village of Cross Keys. What they're looking at is one of three surviving Greek Revival valve houses that once played a vital role in Baltimore's municipal water system. The 16-foot-by-11-foot structure, originally called the Harper Waste Weir by the city water department, was designed by James Slade, the city engineer for Boston and a consulting engineer for the Baltimore Water Works.
NEWS
August 1, 2003
A water-valve leak in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood caused flood damage to 10 homes near a pumping station at Old Cold Spring Lane and Underwood Road, the city Department of Public Works reported. Robert H. Murrow, a DPW spokesman, said the leak occurred after routine maintenance on water valves and released a cascade of water into an alley near the Guilford pumping station and reservoir. Water damaged several yards and basements in the area, Murrow said. About a dozen Public Works employees were dispatched to the scene and halted the leak about 8 p.m., Murrow said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
A Harford County utility worker is suing a Bel Air engineering firm and a Fallston contractor for alleged negligence and faulty design and installation of an air relief valve that burst and struck him in the face in 1992.In the lawsuit, Ronald Burns, 34, of the 2400 block of Rocks Road in Forest Hill, contends he was removing the valve to repair a leaky water main when it burst, injuring his head and neck.Mr. Burns, an employee of the Department of Public Works, is seeking $350,000 in damages from Frederick Ward Associates Inc., the company that designed the water line; David R. Hall, an engineer for Frederick Ward Associates; and T. C. Simons Inc., ++ the contractor responsible for building Wheel Road Feeder System, a county project, in 1991 and 1992.
NEWS
By Jonathan Lerner | September 10, 1998
MY FATHER HAS always had enormous energy. If he ever felt ill, you didn't know it. Twenty-five years after ending his career as a foreign service officer, he was enjoying vigorous retirement, a pillar of the Florida community where he lives.Then a bad infection -- one he might have avoided if he'd received an adequate warning from his doctor -- dramatically changed all that.It's a problem that affects scores of people annually -- those who, like my father, have had a joint or heart-valve replacement.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 2, 1998
Vandals opened a valve at an outdoor pump house in Harford County on Wednesday night, spilling home heating oil onto an oil company's property and into a stream, police said yesterday.Investigators said it could take up to two days to clean the site at Heaps Oil Co. in the 4600 block of Green Marble Road in Whiteford.Police said they did not know how much oil from the 6,500-gallon tank had spilled into the stream. They said an unknown amount had been stolen. The oil company's owner found the spill about 9 LTC a.m. yesterday and notified the county Sheriff's Department and the Maryland Department of the Environment, police said.
NEWS
By SARAH ABRUZZESE and SARAH ABRUZZESE,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
The Clifton Park Valve House is a wreck, slowly decaying as time passes. Surrounded by chain-link fence, its stained-glass windows are shattered, and the sky is clearly visible through missing roof tiles. Developer Charles T. Jeffries wants to restore the rare 1888 octagonal structure and transform it into offices. But his dream seems unlikely to become reality. After years of delay and wrangling, city officials have had enough of Jeffries and his Center Development Corp. He missed the contractual deadline to begin construction, so the city has terminated his 50-year lease on the property in Northeast Baltimore's Clifton Park.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
The guessing games are over at Carroll Springs School: A plumber has found not only the source of the rubbing-alcohol odor in the school's water, but also the cause.A valve that regulates the mixing of hot and cold water was leaking diethyl ether from a diaphragm that expands and contracts according to the water temperature. The valve was probably weakened by a hot water heater set too high, said Vernon Smith, director of support services for Carroll County schools."That was the source of the problem all along; it had nothing to do with the solar panels on top of the building," Mr. Smith said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 16, 2012
News Roundup •••• The “is Valve making a console?” rumors got a lot more interesting as Apple is now being linked to the Steamers (as I like to call them), but in terms of “wearable computing” (i.e. Google's first potential Project Glass competitor). Huh? [ Metro ] •••• Video game sales continue to plummet, down another 20% in March. The steepest decline in the area of hardware might be due to the fact that the current most popular hardware available is really freaking old . You're not helping either, Vita . [ Zacks ]
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Around 1,000 gallons of corn syrup escaped from a South Baltimore storage tank Friday night, and 300 gallons of the sticky substance wound up in the Inner Harbor before a leaking valve was plugged, fire officials say. The leak occurred at Westway Feed Products in Locust Point, said fire operation aide Kris Floyd. Fire officials originally reported the location as the nearby Domino Sugar factory. By 10:30 p.m. Friday, firefighters had set up blockades on Hull Street to keep the syrup from reaching storm drains, Cartwright said Friday night.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Baltimore County homes in the area of Seven Courts Lane in Perry Hall will lose water service Friday night until Saturday morning as crews replace water valves, officials said. Service will be shut off around 10 p.m. Friday and will return 6 a.m. Saturday, after replacements are made on Seven Courts Lane, according to a statement from the Baltimore City Department of Public Works. About 500 residences on Seven Courts Lane and all the courts between Joppa Road to Plantagenet Circle will be affected and should receive a notification flier.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
Colfax Corp., which makes industrial pumps and valves, announced Wednesday that it's relocating its Richmond, Va.-based headquarters to Columbia in January. Clay Kiefaber, Colfax's chief executive, said in a statement that the new Maryland location provides "an opportunity to continue recruiting the associates we need to build the best team. " With proximity to Baltimore and Washington, the company "will have improved access to international travel and to our key advisors in the immediate area and the northeast," Kiefaber said.
NEWS
April 17, 2010
Residents of eastern Baltimore County can expect a series of water service interruptions next weekend as officials perform maintenance work on a 12-inch water main valve off Back River Neck Road. To do the work, which begins 9 p.m. Friday, crews from the Baltimore City Department of Public Works will shut down two major water mains in the east county. The resulting water cutoffs are expected to affect residents of the Back River Neck, Middle River, Middleborough, Turkey Point, Hyde Park, Rocky Point, Breezy Point and Marlyn Avenue areas.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | March 30, 2009
Former first lady Barbara Bush and comedian Robin Williams made headlines recently because both underwent aortic valve replacement surgery. Although open-heart surgery sounds scary, Dr. John V. Conte, associate director in the division of cardiac surgery and a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute, says aortic valve replacement is one of the most common procedures heart surgeons perform. Most patients can expect a full recovery. What is the aortic valve?
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2004
A broken water valve in an underground pipe on U.S. 40 at Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City affected operations in Howard County's George Howard Building yesterday, and repairs will disrupt traffic tomorrow night, county officials said. James M. Irvin, the county public works director, said county workers tried to repair the valve early yesterday but postponed the job after finding it would be more complex than first thought. As a result, the valve bringing water down Rogers Avenue to the county government complex was closed to stop water leakage, and rerouting the flow caused another blockage to the George Howard Building.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
The flight engineer of a World Airways plane that dumped jet fuel onto a Glen Burnie woman and her son this year knew well before landing that a fuel valve was stuck but foresaw no threat that warranted alerting the airport.Airline officials met with U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest yesterday to go over the events of Jan. 20. Gilchrest, a Republican who represents areas near Baltimore-Washington International Airport, met the representatives as part of his investigation on whether congressional hearings on midair jet fuel dumpings are necessary.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Noel Blair Hunter Cochrane, founder and president of an industrial valve and filtering business, died of a respiratory ailment Feb. 3 at his Lutherville home. He was 88. Born in London on Christmas Day and known as Blair, he emigrated at age 3 with his family to the United States. His father, great-grandnephew of Adm. Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, was recruited to work in the United States. The elder Mr. Cochrane was chief financial officer of the newly opened Lord Baltimore Hotel.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | April 8, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Egypt will host a high-level international conference in May to discuss ways to stabilize Iraq and prevent the spread of sectarian violence to its neighbors, Iraq's foreign minister said yesterday. The meeting will provide a rare opportunity for U.S. officials to sit at the same table with counterparts from Iran and Syria. Tensions have skyrocketed in the wake of accusations by Washington that its adversaries are providing support to militants fighting U.S. soldiers in Iraq.
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