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Values Education

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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | October 14, 1990
Parents, students, school employees and county residents surveyed by a school system task force overwhelmingly favored the teaching of values ranging from freedom of speech to compassion in the county public schools.The task force, appointed in April 1989, drew up a list of 18 values, then, last March, sent out 10,000 questionnaires randomly through PTAs, school administrators, and school employee paychecks asking people whether they agreed that these values should be taught in school.Of the 2,775 people who responded, 88 percent said "yes" and 3 percent said "no" (undecideds omitted)
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NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 2, 2014
UMBC is home to students from more than 100 countries and to thousands of students who are first- and second-generation Americans. I continually think about the experiences and perspectives these students bring to our campus and to Maryland. One particular exchange stands out in my mind. "If I don't do well in my classes," a Jamaican student told me, "my younger brothers and sisters may not eat. I know I am not just here for myself but for my family. " There is hardship and worry in that statement, but at its center, there is hope.
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NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | November 21, 1990
Facing little public opposition, the Howard County school board unanimously agreed last night to teach values in the classroom, adopting a list of 18 "common values" that will be worked into the curriculum.The values, ranging from appreciation for diversity to self-discipline, were recommended by a 24-member task force of parents, students and administrators appointed by Superintendent Michael E. Hickey.The task force said education in values was needed because of "increasing national attention concerning statistics on crime rates, drug and alcohol abuse, teen pregnancy and a general deterioration of societal values."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Frank Bond Sr., a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver and neighborhood activist who believed in the value of education, died Monday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. "Frank was a wonderful man who treasured education even though he was not an educated man," said W. Byron Forbush II, who retired in 1998 after 38 years as headmaster of Friends School. "His three children went to Friends as well as two grandchildren," said Mr. Forbush. "He was so devoted and proud that his family was part of that institution.
FEATURES
April 6, 1997
WHEN MY OWN personal middle-schooler entered a behavioral slump, particularly in his relationships with substitute teachers, I went to the principal of his school and asked for her help."
BUSINESS
By Bruce Reid | January 22, 1992
Instilling fundamental values, such as ethical treatment of employees, in the workplace will make the Baltimore region competitive as it moves into the next century, says a report released today by leaders of local businesses, religious groups and other organizations."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 26, 1994
One of the best ways to find out what your children are learning at school, since they can't seem to find the words when you ask, is to sort through the mess in their backpacks.The last backpack load of the school year is especially revealing, since the teachers insist that the kids empty their desks of all the forgotten permission slips and notes home before they will promote them to the next grade. Though it is a little late in the game, you finally get a look at what your children have spent an academic year learning.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
NTC Who says TV is all trash?Teachers at Talbott Springs Elementary School don't think so. They're using the tube to expound on such values as responsibility, integrity, honesty, self-worth and care for the environment.The lessons come in 10-minute "TV Talks," periodic discussions about what's good and bad, as portrayed in popular television programs.The talks are the brainchild of Principal Thomas Brown, who was looking for ways to incorporate Howard County's 2-year-old values education initiative into the curriculum.
NEWS
September 2, 1992
In the 1960s and 1970s, when social change came in radical spurts, a number of approaches to teaching values in the public schools gained favor only to be thrown out and replaced by something new. Teachers were understandably confused. Most eventually shied away from teaching values at all.Since the mid-1980s, a number of Maryland school districts have been struggling with ways to teach values in the classroom again. Howard County is the latest to step forward with a far-reaching plan to begin teaching a set of 18 "core values" throughout its public schools this year.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
Should the life of a severely handicapped newborn be preserved at all cost? Or should nature be allowed to claim the infant's life, sparing both child and parents the pain and anguish that might follow?On a recent sunny afternoon, Barbara Chase, headmistress of Bryn Mawr, and eight seniors at Baltimore's all-girls school sat around a conference table, discussing the perplexing issue.On another part of the campus, Marlisa Parker, lower school director, led a similar seminar for six fifth-graders over lunch.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Rosie L. Stanfield, a registered nurse who later became the first African-American director of nursing at Spring Grove Hospital Center, died Saturday of ovarian cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Randallstown resident was 66. The daughter of a long-distance truck driver and a homemaker, Rosie Louise Walker — who went by the name Rose — was born one of 10 children in Olney. The family later moved to Catonsville, where she attended Baltimore County public schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | July 25, 2009
Theresa V. "Granny" Fenwick, former supervisor of laundry services at the old Provident Hospital who stressed the value of education to her children and grandchildren, died in her sleep July 18 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Elkridge resident had celebrated her 100th birthday in June. Theresa Veroma Hammond, whose parents were Cherokee Indians, was born and raised in Anderson, S.C., where she attended public schools through the third grade. "In the early 1930s, her father was threatened with lynching, which caused him to gather his family and flee in the middle of the night to the North.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1997
HE IS known to his colleagues as "the conscience of the Maryland Senate."And last week, in the final hours of the General Assembly's 1997 session, it was obvious why.Rising to deliver one of the more impassioned speeches all year, Senate Majority Leader Clarence W. Blount was able to do what no one else had seemed to do in the previous 89 days.Just before a critical vote on the city schools deal, he focused the attention of the legislature where it belonged -- on the schoolchildren of Baltimore City.
FEATURES
April 6, 1997
WHEN MY OWN personal middle-schooler entered a behavioral slump, particularly in his relationships with substitute teachers, I went to the principal of his school and asked for her help."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 26, 1994
One of the best ways to find out what your children are learning at school, since they can't seem to find the words when you ask, is to sort through the mess in their backpacks.The last backpack load of the school year is especially revealing, since the teachers insist that the kids empty their desks of all the forgotten permission slips and notes home before they will promote them to the next grade. Though it is a little late in the game, you finally get a look at what your children have spent an academic year learning.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
NTC Who says TV is all trash?Teachers at Talbott Springs Elementary School don't think so. They're using the tube to expound on such values as responsibility, integrity, honesty, self-worth and care for the environment.The lessons come in 10-minute "TV Talks," periodic discussions about what's good and bad, as portrayed in popular television programs.The talks are the brainchild of Principal Thomas Brown, who was looking for ways to incorporate Howard County's 2-year-old values education initiative into the curriculum.
NEWS
By William K. Kilpatrick | July 23, 1993
IN CAMBRIDGE, Mass., a 15-year-old is accused of murdering a college student during a mugging, then bragging to his two high school-age accomplices that the knife went all the way through the body.After the boy's arraignment, some of his classmates cried. Not for the loss of a promising life, but for the high bail that had been placed on their friend. When a reporter asked one of them what the appropriate punishment for murder should be, he responded, "counseling." Said another, a girl, "What's the big bleepin' deal?
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 2, 2014
UMBC is home to students from more than 100 countries and to thousands of students who are first- and second-generation Americans. I continually think about the experiences and perspectives these students bring to our campus and to Maryland. One particular exchange stands out in my mind. "If I don't do well in my classes," a Jamaican student told me, "my younger brothers and sisters may not eat. I know I am not just here for myself but for my family. " There is hardship and worry in that statement, but at its center, there is hope.
NEWS
By William K. Kilpatrick | July 23, 1993
IN CAMBRIDGE, Mass., a 15-year-old is accused of murdering a college student during a mugging, then bragging to his two high school-age accomplices that the knife went all the way through the body.After the boy's arraignment, some of his classmates cried. Not for the loss of a promising life, but for the high bail that had been placed on their friend. When a reporter asked one of them what the appropriate punishment for murder should be, he responded, "counseling." Said another, a girl, "What's the big bleepin' deal?
NEWS
September 2, 1992
In the 1960s and 1970s, when social change came in radical spurts, a number of approaches to teaching values in the public schools gained favor only to be thrown out and replaced by something new. Teachers were understandably confused. Most eventually shied away from teaching values at all.Since the mid-1980s, a number of Maryland school districts have been struggling with ways to teach values in the classroom again. Howard County is the latest to step forward with a far-reaching plan to begin teaching a set of 18 "core values" throughout its public schools this year.
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