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NEWS
April 19, 1995
As the nation slowly revives from yet another ordeal with the Internal Revenue Service, Republicans in Congress deserve encouragement as they seek fundamental reform of a system that has run amok. A flat tax, a modified flat tax, a national sales tax, a value added tax, a tax only on money spent -- all these are in the congressional hopper and on next year's presidential campaign agenda.From the Clinton administration comes mostly pious rhetoric that, yes, the present set-up is a horror but, no, it is too risky to indulge in experiments with the world's largest economy.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 4, 2013
Congressional frustration with efforts to get to the bottom of the IRS' targeting of conservative groups plainly shows the tax agency is dangerous to civil liberties, irrevocably broken and corrupting of national politicians. Investigators on Capitol Hill and in the Justice Department may be able to finger a few malefactors, but that won't fix the IRS. The union representing IRS employees is deeply involved in the management of the agency. Its leaders have the self-pronounced goal of doing whatever it takes to defeat conservative politicians, it consults regularly with leading Democratic politicians - including President Barack Obama - on electoral strategy, and it has cultivated a culture that encourages employees to exercise discretion in ways harmful to free speech and association.
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NEWS
By Ron Smith | April 8, 2010
Paul Volcker, the former Federal Reserve chairman and current Obama economic adviser, said this week that our esteemed rulers must consider a European-style value-added tax in order to raise the money needed to bring deficits under control. Appearing at a New York Historical Society event, Mr. Volcker also said a carbon or other energy-related tax might become necessary for the same reason. There you have it: What was once unthinkable in this country is now likely to be imposed on us because — well, because the nation's balance sheet is crimson from top to bottom.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | April 8, 2010
Paul Volcker, the former Federal Reserve chairman and current Obama economic adviser, said this week that our esteemed rulers must consider a European-style value-added tax in order to raise the money needed to bring deficits under control. Appearing at a New York Historical Society event, Mr. Volcker also said a carbon or other energy-related tax might become necessary for the same reason. There you have it: What was once unthinkable in this country is now likely to be imposed on us because — well, because the nation's balance sheet is crimson from top to bottom.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | May 29, 2009
The biggest question facing all of us right now - not to mention our children, their children and all those yet unborn - is how in the world we're going to get out from under the mountains of debt that we have piled up over the years. We owe, as a nation, somewhere in the neighborhood of $11 trillion, and that is a conservative figure. Using generally accepted accounting standards that consider our gigantic unfunded liabilities, the national debt is several times that. We can no longer count on the people of other nations to lend us money that they now know will never be repaid in other than nominal ways, i.e., with vastly cheapened dollars.
NEWS
April 16, 1993
The Clinton administration celebrated the just-passed midnight deadline for filing income taxes in an odd way. It floated balloons suggesting that a value-added tax, a form of national sales or consumption tax, is under consideration as a means of financing health care reforms that may cost anywhere from $30 billion to $90 billion a year.Such timing was less than smart politically. Not only does the balloon float catch citizens at a moment when they are particularly allergic to the subject of taxes; it gives Republicans fighting the president's $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus plan further reason to charge that the Democrats are once again hellbent to tax and spend everything in sight.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A Maryland business-profits tax that reaches out-of-state affiliates of corporations that operate inside the state withstood a constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court yesterday.Without comment, the court turned aside a complaint that Maryland was reaching far beyond its own borders to tax, in an unconstitutional way, some of the profits of export-sales companies.Maryland tax officials, the unsuccessful appeal said, were engaging in "a revolutionary expansion of state taxing power."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The last time a leading Western politician introduced a flat tax, she paid dearly for it.Margaret Thatcher's 1988 poll, or head, tax on every Briton led to demonstrations around the country and a violent riot in London's Trafalgar Square, and inflamed the "fairness issue" that contributed to her downfall a year later.The ordinary Briton was outraged at the notion that the pauper in public housing had to pay exactly the same tax as the lord in his manor. By popular demand, the head tax, which replaced a value-based property tax, is to be converted into a more progressive system next year.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 4, 2013
Congressional frustration with efforts to get to the bottom of the IRS' targeting of conservative groups plainly shows the tax agency is dangerous to civil liberties, irrevocably broken and corrupting of national politicians. Investigators on Capitol Hill and in the Justice Department may be able to finger a few malefactors, but that won't fix the IRS. The union representing IRS employees is deeply involved in the management of the agency. Its leaders have the self-pronounced goal of doing whatever it takes to defeat conservative politicians, it consults regularly with leading Democratic politicians - including President Barack Obama - on electoral strategy, and it has cultivated a culture that encourages employees to exercise discretion in ways harmful to free speech and association.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | March 12, 2002
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - President Bush has signed into law an economic stimulus bill that's too small to be a real stimulus and too late to be of much use. Congress could have enacted legislation of this sort in the fall but for an unseemly political quarrel. Republicans fought for fiscally irresponsible retroactive tax cuts of dubious value in stimulating current spending. Democratic plans, while more balanced toward people of lesser means and the unemployed, weren't (and aren't) well targeted to raise consumption broadly across the economy.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | May 29, 2009
The biggest question facing all of us right now - not to mention our children, their children and all those yet unborn - is how in the world we're going to get out from under the mountains of debt that we have piled up over the years. We owe, as a nation, somewhere in the neighborhood of $11 trillion, and that is a conservative figure. Using generally accepted accounting standards that consider our gigantic unfunded liabilities, the national debt is several times that. We can no longer count on the people of other nations to lend us money that they now know will never be repaid in other than nominal ways, i.e., with vastly cheapened dollars.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | March 12, 2002
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - President Bush has signed into law an economic stimulus bill that's too small to be a real stimulus and too late to be of much use. Congress could have enacted legislation of this sort in the fall but for an unseemly political quarrel. Republicans fought for fiscally irresponsible retroactive tax cuts of dubious value in stimulating current spending. Democratic plans, while more balanced toward people of lesser means and the unemployed, weren't (and aren't) well targeted to raise consumption broadly across the economy.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
As the nation slowly revives from yet another ordeal with the Internal Revenue Service, Republicans in Congress deserve encouragement as they seek fundamental reform of a system that has run amok. A flat tax, a modified flat tax, a national sales tax, a value added tax, a tax only on money spent -- all these are in the congressional hopper and on next year's presidential campaign agenda.From the Clinton administration comes mostly pious rhetoric that, yes, the present set-up is a horror but, no, it is too risky to indulge in experiments with the world's largest economy.
NEWS
July 4, 1993
The Pam Davis Case: A System Of InjusticeI am a 15-year-old freshman at Westminster High School. Maybe I'm young, arrogant and stupid, but something seems bitterly wrong in our judicial system right now.Pamela S. Davis did commit a crime and did deserve some type of penalty for that. I can admit that much with a clear conscience. And maybe I could even accept the excessive punishment heaped upon Ms. Davis if this kind of unfairness was consistent.But it makes me want to cry when I hear that a convicted rapist doesn't even go to jail when he's taken so much from society and all Ms. Davis did in her advocacy for the legalization of marijuana was to encourage free thinking and education.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,Los Angeles Times | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to raise about $60 billion to pay for health care reform, the Clinton administration is considering a new payroll deduction akin to the taxes already being taken out of paychecks for Social Security, Medicare and disability insurance, Hillary Rodham Clinton said yesterday.Consulting with Republican and Democratic senators in a morning meeting, Mrs. Clinton also made clear that the White House has all but ruled out a national sales tax, also known as a value-added tax. That idea had met with bipartisan opposition in Congress.
NEWS
April 16, 1993
The Clinton administration celebrated the just-passed midnight deadline for filing income taxes in an odd way. It floated balloons suggesting that a value-added tax, a form of national sales or consumption tax, is under consideration as a means of financing health care reforms that may cost anywhere from $30 billion to $90 billion a year.Such timing was less than smart politically. Not only does the balloon float catch citizens at a moment when they are particularly allergic to the subject of taxes; it gives Republicans fighting the president's $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus plan further reason to charge that the Democrats are once again hellbent to tax and spend everything in sight.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
LONDON -- In what the opposition called the "biggest climb-down in modern political history," the British government retreated yesterday from the unpopular poll tax and announced a major switch from local to central funding of services.The move shifted the cost of $8 billion worth of services previously financed by local communities to the central government. This will lower the average cost of the local poll, or head, tax by $250 per person.To enable the central government to cover the tab, Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont announced an increase in the value-added tax (VAT)
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The last time a leading Western politician introduced a flat tax, she paid dearly for it.Margaret Thatcher's 1988 poll, or head, tax on every Briton led to demonstrations around the country and a violent riot in London's Trafalgar Square, and inflamed the "fairness issue" that contributed to her downfall a year later.The ordinary Briton was outraged at the notion that the pauper in public housing had to pay exactly the same tax as the lord in his manor. By popular demand, the head tax, which replaced a value-based property tax, is to be converted into a more progressive system next year.
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