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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 6, 2005
DALLAS - A new study has found no clear "normal" level for a PSA test, a finding likely to add to growing uncertainty over one of the foundations of prostate cancer screening. Doctors had once hoped that blood tests for prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, a substance made normally in a man's prostate gland, could signal when the prostate had turned malignant. Since the introduction of the PSA test two decades ago, most doctors have settled on a benchmark of 4 nanograms of PSA per milliliter of blood as the warning point for a PSA test.
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SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
During the dark days of Baltimore baseball, the true fans never gave up. Despite the 14 losing seasons. Despite the maddening trades. Despite the deriding jokes from friends in New York or Boston. So when the Orioles on Sunday finally locked up a spot in the American League Championship Series for the first time in nearly a generation, fans were elated. After sweeping the Detroit Tigers in the AL Division Series, the Orioles need to win four games in the upcoming best-of-seven series to earn their first World Series appearance in 31 years.
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NEWS
By New York Times | March 6, 1992
RICHMOND, Va. -- An Australian syndicate that tried to corner a $27 million Virginia Lottery game handed over a pink ticket bearing the winning numbers yesterday. But state officials here said they would not pay the prize until they investigate the ticket's validity.The Lottery Department said last night that it would rule on the matter by the end of next week.Lottery officials said that the International Lotto Fund, based in Melbourne, Australia, bought 5 million of the 7 million possible numerical combinations in the Feb. 15 game.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
As Orioles rookie first baseman Christian Walker strove this season to develop as a power hitter and solidify his future at first base, a position where power is paramount, he never strayed from the hitting approach that had earned him acclaim. Hitters desperate for power can end up getting pull-happy and sacrifice the bat-to-ball skills that had carried them so far, and Walker, in search of over-the-fence power, continued to focus his approach on hitting up the middle of the field.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
An internal audit of Baltimore crime statistics has concluded that police made only minor paperwork errors in the vast majority of problematic rape reports unearthed during a preliminary review this summer, police officials said yesterday. In August, police officials confirmed the existence of an internal review into potential underreporting of rape statistics to the FBI. The initial review found 78 instances in which departmental records did not seem to support the contention of detectives that a reported rape had actually not occurred.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2002
Darnestown Elementary outside Gaithersburg is a National Blue Ribbon School with many pupils coming from half-million-dollar homes, a stable teaching staff and a principal who seems to be doing all the right things. But the school's latest MSPAP test scores, released this week, tell a different story -- one of falling achievement. In the tests given last spring, 65.5 percent of the schools' third-graders met state standards, down from 78.3 percent the year before. Now, like not a few of his peers across the state, Darnestown Principal Larry Chep is scratching his head -- unsure what to do with this mess of data he has in front of him. He's supposed to look at the numbers from the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program test and tweak instruction at his school -- the hallmark of any good assessment tool.
NEWS
July 12, 1995
Helene Johnson, 89, whose poetry about the life of blacks in America contributed to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and '30s, died Friday in New York. In an essay published in 1972, Ronald Primeau wrote that Ms. Johnson helped establish the Harlem Renaissance's "validity as a movement."Sir James Cameron Tudor, 75, a former deputy prime minister in Barbados, died Sunday after a heart attack in Bridgetown.
NEWS
May 13, 1995
An Anne Arundel Circuit judge ordered prosecutors to reveal what deals it may have made with witnesses in the trial of two brothers charged with being drug kingpins.Judge H. Chester Goudy Jr. ordered prosecutors to disclose the "existence and substance of promises of immunity, leniency or preferentialtreatment" of its witnesses against Roger Lee Emory, 46, of Glen Burnie and his brother, James Mitchell Emory, 48, of Pasadena. Both men were convicted of drug kingpin charges April 19, 1993, but their convictions were overturned last September by the 0Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
September 9, 1997
Hans Eysenck,81, a psychologist who questioned the scientific validity of psychotherapy and published controversial books on intelligence, crime and smoking, died of cancer Thursday in London. A persistent critic of conventional psychotherapy, he advocated "behavior therapy," which aims to treat immediate problems rather than probing for buried causes, as would those schooled in the Sigmund Freud approach.Harold Elwood Yuker,73, a psychologist who defied the cerebral palsy with which he was born to become a leading educator at Hofstra University and an authority on attitudes toward the disabled, died of hypertension and cardiovascular disease Aug. 25 at his home in Bellmore, N.Y.Derek Taylor,65, publicist for the Beatles, died of cancer Sunday at his home in England.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The recent commentary regarding the Baltimore School for the Arts and the experience of Jabril Leach who was dismissed from the school, has some validity ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). No, the school is not equipped to deal with the Jabrils of Baltimore, but at the Baltimore School for the Arts, you will find teachers and administrators willing to meet you halfway. As a student coming from the city's hood, I needed teachers who would go beyond the call of duty (Stephanie Powell and R.C. Gladney to name two)
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The recent commentary regarding the Baltimore School for the Arts and the experience of Jabril Leach who was dismissed from the school, has some validity ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). No, the school is not equipped to deal with the Jabrils of Baltimore, but at the Baltimore School for the Arts, you will find teachers and administrators willing to meet you halfway. As a student coming from the city's hood, I needed teachers who would go beyond the call of duty (Stephanie Powell and R.C. Gladney to name two)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Don Zimmerman may have raised a few eyebrows when he elected to promote freshman Max Maxwell to join senior Matt Gregoire and sophomore Nate Lewnes as starting attackmen for UMBC's season opener at No. 3 Maryland on Feb. 15. Maxwell endured a rough debut when he committed a game-high four turnovers and took zero shots in the team's 14-3 loss to the Terps, but he may have validated his coach's decision when he scored his first career hat trick on...
NEWS
April 15, 2013
For years, Baltimore officials felt they could do little more than throw up their hands in frustration over the archipelago of small liquor stores that blight many of the city's poorest neighborhoods. Local residents complain the businesses are magnets for crime whose patrons are unruly and a threat to public safety, while public health officials cite the strong correlation between a range of serious health disorders and the number of liquor stores in a community. The ineffectiveness of the state-controlled city liquor board, as documented in a recent audit, only makes matters worse.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The College Board reports that Maryland high school students again led the country last year in their pass rate on Advanced Placement tests. Even better, the board reported that more African-American students earned passing scores than ever before. That Maryland has been able to increase the number and diversity of students taking AP classes while continuing to see rising test scores is a hopeful sign as the state stands poised to adopt a more challenging curriculum. Last year, 29.6 percent of Maryland high seniors passed at least one of the AP exams, which are offered in 34 subjects including chemistry, calculus, English literature, history and foreign languages.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Noel Tshiani wasn't at his wedding — he listened by phone in another country to the ceremony in the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to court records — but he's just as married as if he'd stood at his bride's side. And soon, he'll be just as divorced and responsible for alimony and child support, a Maryland court has ruled. A World Bank employee, Tshiani was working in another African country when he and Marie-Louise Tshiani married in a 1993 ceremony. He answered questions and listened to the ceremony by telephone, while his cousin stood in his place for the ceremony, court records say. The exchange among families included money, clothes and a goat, and within days, the bride flew to join her husband, according to court records.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
In reporter Annie Linskey 's analysis of an opposition ad against Question 6 ("Claim about marriage referendum is disputed," Oct. 30), she concludes that consequences are not part of the decision to vote on a referendum, but part of a "broader narrative. " Her statement ignores the consequences demonstrated by the ad she criticizes were the result of a federal judge's decision permitting inclusion of same-sex marriage in the curriculum after same-sex marriage was approved in another state.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
The Maryland Court of Appeals denied yesterday a request to have the murder conviction of a Waldorf man erased on the grounds that the man died while his appeal was pending. The request was made on behalf of Stefan Tyson Bell, who was convicted in August 2003 of first-degree murder in the fatal beating of a Gambrills teenager, Joseph A. Demarest, 17, who was killed in 1996. Bell, 27, died of a heroin overdose in prison in March 2005 before an appeal. Bell's lawyer, assistant public defender George E. Burns Jr., had argued that according to court precedent, Bell's conviction should be vacated because he died before a first-level appeal was completed.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 9, 1992
The exhibit of Joseph Sheppard's work now on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery shows he can do a lot of things.He can paint almost anything and make it look real at first glance, whether it's a person, a lobster, a grape, a flower. He's equally at home with individual figures, still lifes and crowded scenes with lots of action. He can organize a complex picture, such as "On the Ganges," so the eye travels where it's supposed to. He can deal with light, shadow and texture -- he can paint a bedcovering that has the proper weight, and make the folds and wrinkles of a sheet or a tablecloth look just right.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Everyone likes to be recognized for a job well done. But despite playing his best defensive seasons the past two years, Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy never thought he'd win a Gold Glove. These days, shortstop is a position of flash - of acrobatic, diving plays, off-balanced throws and behind-the-back tosses. But Hardy was rewarded Tuesday, winning the first Gold Glove of his eight-year big league career, joined by second-time winners Adam Jones and Matt Wieters to make the Orioles' first trifecta of Gold Glove winners since 1998.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
In an effort to quell doubts about the city school system's graduation rate, school officials said this week that the district has ordered principals to take an extra measure this year to validate that all graduating seniors have fulfilled state requirements to obtain a diploma. "We are very, very conscious of making sure that everyone is abiding by [state regulation]," said Tisha Edwards, chief of staff for the school system. "So the high school validation process allows principals to be very, very specific about ensuring that seniors are meeting requirements.” The revelation about the new policy -- which requires principals to sign off that they personally know their seniors are eligible for graduation -- came amid a Baltimore Sun inquiry about graduation requirements being met at the National Academy Foundation high school, where officials confirmed that nearly half of the senior class was found to have not completed graduation requirements.
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