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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 25, 1994
Russia may have political and economic problems, but its music -- at least in the old imperial city of St. Petersburg -- has rarely sounded so good. That's because a dynamo named Valery Gergiev, the young conductor who is artistic director of the great Kirov Opera, has been staging a one-man fight against stagnation."
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By Mike Giuliano | April 5, 2013
Beethoven is such a dominant figure in classical music history that the Hermitage Piano Trio's all-Beethoven program will be heard by an eager audience on Saturday, April 6 at 8 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. This second concert in the sponsoring Candlelight Concert Society's Beethoven Piano Trio Cycle presents that composer's Trio in G Major, Op. 1 No. 2; Trio No. 8 in E-flat Major, WoO 38; Trio in G Major, Op. 121a "Kakadu Variations"; and Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70 No. 2. These pieces collectively give a sense of how Beethoven was a compositional bridge between the formality associated with 18th-century classical music and the freer and more romantic expression associated with 19th-century classical music.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,sun music critic | April 19, 1998
A story about Herbert von Karajan, when the German maestro was simultaneously music director of orchestras in London, Berlin, Paris and Vienna, has him hailing a cab in front of Carnegie Hall."
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 23, 1999
Anna Netrebko is the Anna Kournikova of the operatic world. The difference is that Netrebko is an even better singer than Kournikova is a tennis player.Only one thing may keep Netrebko from achieving superstar status: She never wants to leave her native Russia."What will happen there, I don't know," says Netrebko, who lives in St. Petersburg. "All I know is that I don't want to leave my country."The slim, exquisitely featured Netrebko, with her jet-black hair and eyes and ivory skin, has the sort of face and figure one usually expects to appear on the cover of the European edition of Vogue, not on the opera stage.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 23, 1999
Anna Netrebko is the Anna Kournikova of the operatic world. The difference is that Netrebko is an even better singer than Kournikova is a tennis player.Only one thing may keep Netrebko from achieving superstar status: She never wants to leave her native Russia."What will happen there, I don't know," says Netrebko, who lives in St. Petersburg. "All I know is that I don't want to leave my country."The slim, exquisitely featured Netrebko, with her jet-black hair and eyes and ivory skin, has the sort of face and figure one usually expects to appear on the cover of the European edition of Vogue, not on the opera stage.
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By Mike Giuliano | April 5, 2013
Beethoven is such a dominant figure in classical music history that the Hermitage Piano Trio's all-Beethoven program will be heard by an eager audience on Saturday, April 6 at 8 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. This second concert in the sponsoring Candlelight Concert Society's Beethoven Piano Trio Cycle presents that composer's Trio in G Major, Op. 1 No. 2; Trio No. 8 in E-flat Major, WoO 38; Trio in G Major, Op. 121a "Kakadu Variations"; and Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70 No. 2. These pieces collectively give a sense of how Beethoven was a compositional bridge between the formality associated with 18th-century classical music and the freer and more romantic expression associated with 19th-century classical music.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | August 19, 1994
The U.S. Naval Academy Music Department's 1994-1995 Distinguished Visitors Concert Series promises to be the most exciting in the history of Alumni Hall.The season begins on Sept. 24 at 7:30 p.m. with a performance by the Kirov Orchestra of St. Petersburg, under the direction of Valery Gergiev. The talented Russian's career has advanced steadily since he won the Karajan Competition in Berlin at age 23 and moved to the Kirov Opera as Yuri Temirkanov's assistant.Mr. Gergiev will conduct Wagner's Prelude to "Parsifal," Prokofiev's Fifth Piano Concerto and the wrenching Eighth Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 20, 2003
Just blocks away from the mad tobacco farmer who held D.C. cops and traffic at bay for two days, and perhaps just a sunset or two away from what may well be a devastating war, the Kennedy Center Concert Hall and the profound music of Gustav Mahler offered welcome refuge Tuesday night. On stage was the Kirov Orchestra of the famed Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society. Valery Gergiev, artistic director of the theater since 1988 and one of the hottest conducting forces around, was on the podium.
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By Stephen Wigler | April 19, 1998
Because Valery Gergiev has been so deeply involved with the Kirov Opera, most of his recordings have been primarily of operas - Russian operas, at that. It seems safe to say that in his 10 years on the international scene, Gergiev has done more for the cause of Russian opera than anyone since the legendary basso Fyodor Chalipin.The conductor's two most recent recordings are of operas all but unknown in the West. Both will be performed for perhaps the first time in the United States this week when Gergiev and the Kirov arrive at the Met: Prokofiev's Mozart-like "Betrothal in a Monastery" (Philips 289 462 107-2)
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 26, 1994
Music lovers in the West have been hearing a good deal about the great things taking place at St. Petersburg's Kirov Orchestra under its music director, Valery Gergiev. To judge from the all-Russian program that Gergiev and the Kirov gave yesterday at the Kennedy Center, it's all true.This was an perhaps an even better concert than the one that conductor Mariss Jansons and the St. Petersburg Philharmonic gave at the Kennedy Center last year. This is not said to compare unfavorably one splendid Russian-trained conductor with another.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,sun music critic | April 19, 1998
A story about Herbert von Karajan, when the German maestro was simultaneously music director of orchestras in London, Berlin, Paris and Vienna, has him hailing a cab in front of Carnegie Hall."
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 25, 1994
Russia may have political and economic problems, but its music -- at least in the old imperial city of St. Petersburg -- has rarely sounded so good. That's because a dynamo named Valery Gergiev, the young conductor who is artistic director of the great Kirov Opera, has been staging a one-man fight against stagnation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 13, 2003
Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto in D major; Myaskovsky: Violin Concerto n D minor Vadim Repin, violinist; Kirov Orchestra; Valery Gergiev, conductor. (Philips 289 473 343-2) * * * * If Vadim Repin isn't the finest violinist of his generation (and our time), he sure is doing a great impression of it. This latest recording reconfirms his extraordinarily assured technique, impeccable intonation and absolutely gorgeous tone - not to mention the spark of spontaneity and sheer enjoyment that invariably marks his music-making.
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