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Valerie Harper

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | October 8, 2013
The show opens with its now-regular pro/troupe number. And then the contestants are shown briefly by way of introduction. Of all the changes necessitated by the change to one night a week, the elimination of the grand staircase entrance is an unexpected favorite of mine. OOOooh, Carrie Ann and Bruno are introduced near the end of the routine and do a little shaking and shimmying of their own while moving over to the judges' table. I'm always happy to see the judges dance. But where's Len?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
OK, this Midweek Madness selection is ever so slightly politically incorrect, by 2013 standards. So sue me. This skit from the classic 1960s comedy album "When You're in Love, the Whole World is Jewish" features a young Valerie Harper and some great colleagues. So enjoy it, already. And have a nice hot glass of tea.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and By J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 20, 2002
There are three women of a certain age in Valerie Harper's life -- three women with whom she is intimately acquainted. The first is Rhoda Morgenstern, the TV character Harper played for more than eight years in the 1970s -- first on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, then on her own spinoff, Rhoda -- and with whom she'll forever be associated. The second is Marjorie Taub, the title character of Charles Busch's play, The Tale of the Allergist's Wife. Harper starred in the hit comedy on Broadway and has now taken it on the road (it opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | October 8, 2013
The show opens with its now-regular pro/troupe number. And then the contestants are shown briefly by way of introduction. Of all the changes necessitated by the change to one night a week, the elimination of the grand staircase entrance is an unexpected favorite of mine. OOOooh, Carrie Ann and Bruno are introduced near the end of the routine and do a little shaking and shimmying of their own while moving over to the judges' table. I'm always happy to see the judges dance. But where's Len?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- One could turn the world on with her smile. The other could turn the most embarrassing moment into a punch line full of belly laughs. Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were network television's prime-time response to changing attitudes of and toward women in the 1960s and '70s. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
OK, this Midweek Madness selection is ever so slightly politically incorrect, by 2013 standards. So sue me. This skit from the classic 1960s comedy album "When You're in Love, the Whole World is Jewish" features a young Valerie Harper and some great colleagues. So enjoy it, already. And have a nice hot glass of tea.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 7, 2006
WHEN WILLIAM GIBSON'S PLAY ABOUT Golda Meir, Golda's Balcony, opens at the Hippodrome on Tuesday with Valerie Harper as its star, Baltimore audiences may experience a bit of deja vu. Nearly three decades ago, another Gibson play about the Israeli prime minister played a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre. It was not an event Gibson remembers fondly. GOLDA'S BALCONY -- May 9-21 -- Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. -- $24-$64 -- 410-547-SEAT
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 11, 1995
"The Office" is not the place to be on Saturday nights.I'm talking about the new CBS sitcom "The Office," which premieres at 9 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).The CBS public relations department calls the series "An 'Upstairs, Downstairs' look at office life in America." Right, and "Married . . . With Children" is an "Upstairs, Downstairs" look at the shoe business in America."The Office" does have Valerie Harper ("Rhoda") in the lead and some experienced hands behind the camera. But neither amounts to a pile of paper clips if the concept and writing aren't there.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Ah, just what we need for a relaxing weekend evening: contentious political debates! The lineup offers a couple of prime examples, both local and national. But movies and a Burt Reynolds guest spot may provide relief.* "Square Off" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Although re-scheduled to air only four times a year, the venerable argument show now offers a whole hour of conflict, with host Richard Sher moderating veteran panelists, including: Elane Stein, Tom Marr, Carl Snowden, Boyse Mosley, Arnold Weiner, St. George Crosse, Toni Keane, Ava Lias-Booker, Carter Clews and Bob Scherr.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here's a cool example of what-goes-around-comes-around: In 1965, a British -made thriller called "Die! Die! My Darling!" hit the movie houses. This study in strangeness and sadism starred the indelibly foggy-voiced, deliciously irreverent Tallulah Bankhead in her last film. She plays Mrs. Trefoile, a religious fanatic who keeps a tight rein on her country house and her suspiciously loyal servants. Obsessed with the recent death of her son, Mrs. Trefoile is only too happy to welcome as a guest her son's former fiancee, the decidedly worldly Patricia Carroll.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here's a cool example of what-goes-around-comes-around: In 1965, a British -made thriller called "Die! Die! My Darling!" hit the movie houses. This study in strangeness and sadism starred the indelibly foggy-voiced, deliciously irreverent Tallulah Bankhead in her last film. She plays Mrs. Trefoile, a religious fanatic who keeps a tight rein on her country house and her suspiciously loyal servants. Obsessed with the recent death of her son, Mrs. Trefoile is only too happy to welcome as a guest her son's former fiancee, the decidedly worldly Patricia Carroll.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 7, 2006
WHEN WILLIAM GIBSON'S PLAY ABOUT Golda Meir, Golda's Balcony, opens at the Hippodrome on Tuesday with Valerie Harper as its star, Baltimore audiences may experience a bit of deja vu. Nearly three decades ago, another Gibson play about the Israeli prime minister played a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre. It was not an event Gibson remembers fondly. GOLDA'S BALCONY -- May 9-21 -- Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. -- $24-$64 -- 410-547-SEAT
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and By J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 20, 2002
There are three women of a certain age in Valerie Harper's life -- three women with whom she is intimately acquainted. The first is Rhoda Morgenstern, the TV character Harper played for more than eight years in the 1970s -- first on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, then on her own spinoff, Rhoda -- and with whom she'll forever be associated. The second is Marjorie Taub, the title character of Charles Busch's play, The Tale of the Allergist's Wife. Harper starred in the hit comedy on Broadway and has now taken it on the road (it opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2000
The movie is not that great, but it does feel good to see Mary and Rhoda again and get a chance to spend some time with them after all these years. That's the nicest thing I can say about "Mary and Rhoda," the ABC made-for-TV movie tonight that brings back Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) and Rhoda Morgenstern (Valerie Harper) from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," one of the most beloved and important sitcoms in television history. Mary deserves respect. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- One could turn the world on with her smile. The other could turn the most embarrassing moment into a punch line full of belly laughs. Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were network television's prime-time response to changing attitudes of and toward women in the 1960s and '70s. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Ah, just what we need for a relaxing weekend evening: contentious political debates! The lineup offers a couple of prime examples, both local and national. But movies and a Burt Reynolds guest spot may provide relief.* "Square Off" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Although re-scheduled to air only four times a year, the venerable argument show now offers a whole hour of conflict, with host Richard Sher moderating veteran panelists, including: Elane Stein, Tom Marr, Carl Snowden, Boyse Mosley, Arnold Weiner, St. George Crosse, Toni Keane, Ava Lias-Booker, Carter Clews and Bob Scherr.
FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina and Mark de la Vina,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
While everyone else focuses on what's going to happen to actor David Caruso, the producers of the television show "NYPD Blue" have to figure out what to do with Det. John Kelly.They could get Hong Kong action director John Woo to work the season's fourth episode and have him die in a maelstrom of shrapnel while trying to stop the Zodiac killer.Or, if Steve Bochco and his writers need more inspiration, they could look at how past shows have handled the departure of important cast members:* Shannen Doherty, "Beverly Hills, 90210."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2000
The movie is not that great, but it does feel good to see Mary and Rhoda again and get a chance to spend some time with them after all these years. That's the nicest thing I can say about "Mary and Rhoda," the ABC made-for-TV movie tonight that brings back Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) and Rhoda Morgenstern (Valerie Harper) from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," one of the most beloved and important sitcoms in television history. Mary deserves respect. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 11, 1995
"The Office" is not the place to be on Saturday nights.I'm talking about the new CBS sitcom "The Office," which premieres at 9 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).The CBS public relations department calls the series "An 'Upstairs, Downstairs' look at office life in America." Right, and "Married . . . With Children" is an "Upstairs, Downstairs" look at the shoe business in America."The Office" does have Valerie Harper ("Rhoda") in the lead and some experienced hands behind the camera. But neither amounts to a pile of paper clips if the concept and writing aren't there.
FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina and Mark de la Vina,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
While everyone else focuses on what's going to happen to actor David Caruso, the producers of the television show "NYPD Blue" have to figure out what to do with Det. John Kelly.They could get Hong Kong action director John Woo to work the season's fourth episode and have him die in a maelstrom of shrapnel while trying to stop the Zodiac killer.Or, if Steve Bochco and his writers need more inspiration, they could look at how past shows have handled the departure of important cast members:* Shannen Doherty, "Beverly Hills, 90210."
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