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Valentine S Day

ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Sure, not everyone wants to celebrate Valentine's Day. It's not so hard to sit it out. But imagine if you and your sweetheart worked together in the Valentine's Day industry, catering to romance but, come dinnertime on Feb. 14, never able to experience it yourselves. That's the situation facing couples who work together in restaurants. Picture them: One is firing up a filet mignons, the other is clambering over boxes of sparkling wine in the walk-in. All the while, customers are glowing dreamily in the candlelight, clasping hands under the table and feeding each other succulent bites of lobster Thermidor.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
An Annapolis floral institution that over the years counted lawmakers, lobbyists and even governors among its clientele, has changed hands. Flowers by James -- a family business for 45 years on State Circle -- is now York Flowers, bought by a third-generation florist whose shop is in an upscale neighborhood of northwest Washington. Just steps from the State House and governor's mansion, Flowers by James has decorated weddings for thousands of brides around Annapolis, supplied corsages for the Naval Academy and many a May Day basket for businesses in Annapolis's Historic District.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
For this Valentine's season, the folks at Bay Theatre are offering A. R. Gurney's 1989 off-beat near-classic, "Love Letters. " This two-person play is ideally suited to Bay's intimate space, as well as its intention of extending the Valentine season through March 4. Contemporary playwright Gurney describes his work as, "a sort of play which needs no theater, no lengthy rehearsal, no special set, no memorization of lines and no commitment from its...
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 14, 1992
CHICAGO -- It's the season of love, and the spy-on-your-lover business is hopping.While card shops net secret admirers and restaurants serve cuddling couples, detective agencies are busy looking out for suspicious sweethearts.Valentine's Day and the days before and after it, according to some Chicago-area investigators, keep detectives busy tracking illicit lovers and videotaping them in compromising positions.Many clients consider the season prime time for catching mates and spouses in the arms of secret paramours, detectives said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | February 12, 2013
Septimius somehow remains mysterious even though he puts a lot of himself out there. First, he goes by Septimius the Great, a Roman emperor who conquered the Parthian Empire, which, we assume, is a lot to live up to. Septimius (the singer, not the emperor) says he is influenced most by "diversity and adversity," which is simulatenously confusing and intriguing. A few minutes spent on his website, septimiusthegreat.com , and you're deeply immersed in striking fashion, tunes such as "Iam Fashion" and "Zodiac Lover," and a photo of him sitting on a "human throne" (pictured here in all its glory)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Nearly 102, Rose Sudmeier still feels a thrill when she receives flowers for Valentine's Day. "You are never too old," said Sudmeier, a resident of Oakland Manor Assisted Living in Sykesville. "There is nothing like pretty live flowers." She was among 700 seniors to have bouquets delivered this week, gifts from volunteers at St. Joseph Catholic Community in Eldersburg. Firmly clutching the bud vase and chatting amiably between gentle whiffs of floral scent, Sudmeier said, "I have no other valentines.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 7, 1999
Early February is the sanctioned time for romance to enter every corner of life, as Valentine's Day approaches. On the assumption that your sweetheart might like something that isn't covered in chocolate, here are some suggestions for gifts that are sweet but not edible.It's time to recall romantic erasMaximal Art's designer, John Wind, gets inspiration from Victorian, Edwardian and antique French sources. The line features watches, bracelets, necklaces, mezuzot, picture frames and clocks.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
You're smitten with your valentine, but not with the idea of a mass-produced card or a pricey trinket. Then why not give the objection of your affection a handmade gift? While crafting was once the domain of your grandmother, these days do-it-yourself projects are hip and retro-chic. And thanks to such popular websites as Etsy - a marketplace for handmade and vintage items - and fun reads like Suzie Williams' "The Complete Book of Retro Crafts," it's now a cinch to go "crafty. " And there's sentimental value.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
It started with an invitation to participate in an art show that would present works by couples on Valentine's Day. Two MICA alumni, Christina Ayala and John Morris, decided to give it a try, and a twist. "I had been kicking around the idea of telepathy for a while," says the Georgia-born Morris, 35, an adjunct photography faculty member. "We wanted to see if we could create art using the telepathic process." Ayala, 40, who works for Southwest Airlines (she's originally from Texas)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susanne Althoff and Susanne Althoff,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Today's Valentine's Day is planets away from the simple pagan festival of Roman origin that allowed boys to draw a girl's name from a love urn. Now the day is celebrated with gifts of lingerie, long-stemmed roses and, oh no, chocolates in heart-shaped boxes with garish flowers on top.If you're looking for something different to do this year, here are 14 suggestions:1.The Walters Art Gallery has collected sculpture, chocolate tortes, orchestra rhythms and more chocolate for tonight's "Dessert and Dancing."
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