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Valentine S Day

NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 15, 2007
The quartets were hired to knock on doors and deliver messages of love through song. They were prepared to belt out tunes like "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" and "Heart of My Heart." They would be armed with roses, candy and cards. But some of the singers could not make it out of their driveways. "We went to bed last night with every intention of hitting the road running, and it just didn't work out that way," Dennis Hawkins, the singing-valentine coordinator for Dundalk's Chorus of the Chesapeake, said yesterday.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,sun reporter | February 10, 2007
Younger men cower in the doorway of the lingerie store, but 74-year-old Chester Taplette practically gallops across the leopard-print carpet. He's been staking out this Frederick's of Hollywood in Glen Burnie's Marley Station Mall for weeks now, "scheming," he says, about which lacy item to buy for his Annie on their 48th Valentine's Day as husband and wife. And because Annie has been his partner in every decision for nearly half a century now, why would he exclude her from this one? The 67-year-old follows a few steps behind her husband, her head swaddled in a scarf to conceal the curlers in her hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Red velvet is huge at weddings but it's a big deal for Valentine's Day. You can line your sweetheart's Valentine's Day with red velvet from sunup to sunset. Red velvet waffles and pancakes make a striking appearance on the breakfast table. Treat someone to breakfast at the Blue Moon Cafe in Fells Point, where Sarah Simington's red velvet pancakes, studded with white chocolate chips, are making their annual Valentine's Day appearance. For cocktail hour, head to Morton's the Steakhouse, which is serving its red velvet cocktail, a pretty potion of prosecco, raspberry lambic and Chambord, garnished with a raspberry.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 11, 1998
VALENTINE'S DAY is sneaky. Unlike Thanksgiving, which can be counted on to land on the same day of the week, this one moves around. One year it is Tuesday. The next year it is not.Often I am one of the masses of males who, on the eve of the elusive Valentine's Day, rush out and buy anything red.This year I tried to jog my memory by linking the date of Valentine's Day with another significant cultural event held in February, the National Basketball Association All-Star game. The two events usually fall within a few days of each other.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
For this Valentine's season, the folks at Bay Theatre are offering A. R. Gurney's 1989 off-beat near-classic, "Love Letters. " This two-person play is ideally suited to Bay's intimate space, as well as its intention of extending the Valentine season through March 4. Contemporary playwright Gurney describes his work as, "a sort of play which needs no theater, no lengthy rehearsal, no special set, no memorization of lines and no commitment from its...
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | January 4, 2008
Friends, acquaintances and family members are never at a loss when it comes to buying a gift for Mike and Karen Washburn. At any time of year - or for any conceivable occasion - the jolly old man in red is always gratefully accepted. Replicas, naturally. Big red hearts, inflatable bunnies and giant pumpkins are also welcome. Not to mention flags and bunting. Seasonal decorating of their Hanover home is a task the Washburns relish. The front lawn of the Anne Arundel County home changes appropriately with the calendar - Christmas, Valentine's Day, Easter, Halloween, Independence Day. This holiday season, displays included an inflatable Santa on his sleigh inside a snow globe and a life-size Mr. Claus on a motorcycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Patrick Dahlgren is busy. The Baltimore native is helping to launch a beer-themed restaurant near Harbor East and is about to revamp his own restaurant in Federal Hill. "I've always been around good food," Dahlgren said. "I grew up running around Sisson's. " Dahlgren's stepfather is Hugh Sisson, who established Baltimore's first microbrewery in Federal Hill back in 1989 and went on to found Clipper City Brewing Co., producers of Heavy Seas beers. Dahlgren is part of the team behind the eagerly awaited Heavy Seas Alehouse, scheduled for a Feb. 15 opening in the Old Holland Tack Factory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | February 12, 2013
Septimius somehow remains mysterious even though he puts a lot of himself out there. First, he goes by Septimius the Great, a Roman emperor who conquered the Parthian Empire, which, we assume, is a lot to live up to. Septimius (the singer, not the emperor) says he is influenced most by "diversity and adversity," which is simulatenously confusing and intriguing. A few minutes spent on his website, septimiusthegreat.com , and you're deeply immersed in striking fashion, tunes such as "Iam Fashion" and "Zodiac Lover," and a photo of him sitting on a "human throne" (pictured here in all its glory)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 10, 1993
Valentine's Day used to be a wonderful time in the heady days before romance entered into its sordid relationship with Big Business.Back then a man could dash into a drug store after work and pick up a sappy Hallmark card and cheap box of candy, and be relatively certain that the woman in his life would just about turn cartwheels at this incredible thoughtfulness.Then, I don't know . . . something happened.Suddenly, it wasn't enough to burst into a Rite-Aid 10 minutes before closing time and bark at the startled Whitesnake freak with the nose ring behind the register: "The little, y'know, chocolates in the, uh, sampler thing . . . YOU GOT ANYMORE OF THEM?
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1994
C On the day after Valentine's Day, it's the thought that doesn't count.No matter what you buy, the fact is, the gift is a day late. And if you give the wrong gift even if it's on the right day, you're still in trouble.Greg Rogers, a 42-year-old sales manager from Kent Island, had this idea. Call it impulsive, romantic -- and ultimately useless. On Valentine's Day night, he suggested to his wife that they fly to Florida for a long weekend. Forget the flowers and candy. Think sunshine, honey.
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