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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 21, 2003
Val Kilmer throws his head back and laughs at the question. Then he narrows his eyes and furrows his brow. He looks skyward to ponder the question for a few moments. "Hmmm, there must have been one," he says. "Oh, what about Top Gun? I suppose that was one. "And Batman Forever. That was definitely one. And I really thought Red Planet was one, although it didn't turn out to be one." He shakes his head. "That might be it. I can't think of any more." The question was: "Have you ever picked a role because it might actually help your career?
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By From Sun news services | January 31, 2009
Val Kilmer to be among Mardi Gras royalty at Bacchus parade Actor Val Kilmer will reign as celebrity king when the Krewe of Bacchus parade rolls through New Orleans on Feb. 22, two days before Mardi Gras. Kilmer will be decked out in royal apparel as he rides through the city on a float in the annual parade. "He's very excited," said Bacchus captain Owen "Pip" Brennan, who has been in contact with Kilmer about the event. Kilmer will visit Children's Hospital, a tradition every reigning Bacchus has participated in for the past three decades, Brennan said.
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By Josh Mooney | September 27, 1991
THE DOORSLive Home Video$92.95No less an important critic than Doors' keyboardist Ray Manzarek was not happy -- not in the least -- with the way director Oliver Stone portrayed his band in this big-budget return to the '60s. If he'd been dismayed at the way he was portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan, or by the general dullness of the film, he would have had a point. But Mr. Manzarek's complaint was with Mr. Stone's depiction of the Door frontman Jim Morrison, rock deity, worldwide cult hero and all-around crazy man genius.
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By ROBIN ABCARIAN and ROBIN ABCARIAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 16, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- Backstage at the El Capitan Theatre, comedian Sarah Silverman is kneeling on the floor of her boyfriend's crowded office, looking rapturously at his image on a flat-screen monitor. She is wearing low-slung jeans, a worn navy crew-neck sweater over a baseball T-shirt, and sneakers. Her silky black hair is pulled into a ponytail. She is very pretty, looking more like a fresh-scrubbed college kid than the 34-year-old showbiz vet that she is. On the TV monitor, her boyfriend, Jimmy Kimmel, whose late-night talk show is taped at the El Capitan, is interviewing Val Kilmer.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The sinner who is "The Saint" and the saint who is his co-star came here to attract attention to that movie on which, for both of them, much rides.For him, it's a chance to prove that he can carry a big movie without wearing a bat cape; for her it's a chance to consolidate after the triumph of "Leaving Las Vegas."She's very angular; he's very unangular. She's got a profile; he's got a blur. Both are blond; neither is very big. He eats Bagel Chips and smokes Merits while he talks and literally wears rose-colored glasses; she eats a fruit salad.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
There's too much plot and not enough story in "The Saint." It's one of those big, busy things that doesn't quite work: Every two minutes a baffling new character enters, speaks in a heavy Russian accent and tilts the movie in some unfathomable direction. You sit there waiting for something not to happen, for a moment of repose, so you can add it all up.The movie re-creates the famous Leslie Charteris character, the elegant, unflappable, bemused professional thief Simon Templar, played previously by slick cads Roger Moore and George Sanders.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 11, 2005
No one does erupting instinct better than Robert Downey Jr. - his id plays hopscotch with his superego and usually wins. No one does calculated outrageousness better than Val Kilmer, who long ago decided moviegoers must take him as he is, supercilious wit and all. They're itchy-funny and potent together, like two lone wolves strapped to a dogsled, in the recklessly headlong murder mystery Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. Downey plays a New York thief who escapes from a botched robbery attempt into a casting call that lands him a possible role in a City of Angels movie thriller.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
Wonderland marks a "biopic" first: Moviegoers will know less about the real-life subject going out than they did going in. Forget porno-watchers who remember John Holmes (Val Kilmer) as the monarch of blue movies in the '70s. Those who've seen Boogie Nights, with its Holmes-inspired antihero Dirk Diggler, will already have a better grasp of the porn boom's cruddy drug-fueled euphoria and death spiral than they'll get from Wonderland. The movie tells and retells, roughly two and a half times, the story of how Holmes, already over the hill in 1981, either triggered or took direct part in a quadruple killing in a drug dealer's pad on Hollywood's Wonderland Avenue.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
If only a few minutes of "At First Sight" rang true.Although based on a true story, this tale of a blind massage therapist whose busybody new girlfriend convinces him to undergo a risky operation to restore his sight comes across as phony as anything Washington has to offer these days.Leads Val Kilmer and Mira Sorvino exhibit hardly any chemistry (though they do share the bond of being inordinately attractive people), the script never opts for a single tug at your heartstrings when a dozen will do, and the supporting players (including Nathan Lane, Kelly McGillis and Bruce Davison)
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 2005
Mindhunters is a credulity-stretching thriller that comes to the United States only after having made the rounds of the rest of the civilized world. Yeah, it's pretty bad. This Renny Harlin-directed dopefest has a premise that should have been laughed out of the first script conference. FBI cadets studying to be profilers are spending the weekend at an uninhabited island training facility where, as a sort of final exam, they must try to solve a series of mock murders by a fiendish killer.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 11, 2005
No one does erupting instinct better than Robert Downey Jr. - his id plays hopscotch with his superego and usually wins. No one does calculated outrageousness better than Val Kilmer, who long ago decided moviegoers must take him as he is, supercilious wit and all. They're itchy-funny and potent together, like two lone wolves strapped to a dogsled, in the recklessly headlong murder mystery Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. Downey plays a New York thief who escapes from a botched robbery attempt into a casting call that lands him a possible role in a City of Angels movie thriller.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 2005
Mindhunters is a credulity-stretching thriller that comes to the United States only after having made the rounds of the rest of the civilized world. Yeah, it's pretty bad. This Renny Harlin-directed dopefest has a premise that should have been laughed out of the first script conference. FBI cadets studying to be profilers are spending the weekend at an uninhabited island training facility where, as a sort of final exam, they must try to solve a series of mock murders by a fiendish killer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 12, 2004
When he did Wag the Dog, David Mamet parodied the lengths to which modern-day politicians will go in pursuit of power. In Spartan, he's made that pursuit the stuff of nightmares. At its essence, Spartan is the story of a kidnapping, with the president's daughter as the victim. Charged with finding her is Robert Scott (Val Kilmer), a career military man of extreme toughness and force of will -- he's one of those guys who'll do anything he's ordered to do, from mop a floor to murder a civilian, and worry about the moral implications never.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
Wonderland marks a "biopic" first: Moviegoers will know less about the real-life subject going out than they did going in. Forget porno-watchers who remember John Holmes (Val Kilmer) as the monarch of blue movies in the '70s. Those who've seen Boogie Nights, with its Holmes-inspired antihero Dirk Diggler, will already have a better grasp of the porn boom's cruddy drug-fueled euphoria and death spiral than they'll get from Wonderland. The movie tells and retells, roughly two and a half times, the story of how Holmes, already over the hill in 1981, either triggered or took direct part in a quadruple killing in a drug dealer's pad on Hollywood's Wonderland Avenue.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 21, 2003
Val Kilmer throws his head back and laughs at the question. Then he narrows his eyes and furrows his brow. He looks skyward to ponder the question for a few moments. "Hmmm, there must have been one," he says. "Oh, what about Top Gun? I suppose that was one. "And Batman Forever. That was definitely one. And I really thought Red Planet was one, although it didn't turn out to be one." He shakes his head. "That might be it. I can't think of any more." The question was: "Have you ever picked a role because it might actually help your career?
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
He's starred in 27 films, some of them blockbusters. He's played Moses and Elvis, Doc Holliday and Batman. He bagged $9 million for his latest role in a major release, and no less a luminary than Nicole Kidman says he has "the best lips in the business." Yet if you heard the name Val Kilmer, you might well be unable to summon a clear image to mind. He just might be America's most anonymous major star. "If there is an award for the most unsung leading actor of his generation," writes critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times, "Kilmer should get it."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 12, 2004
When he did Wag the Dog, David Mamet parodied the lengths to which modern-day politicians will go in pursuit of power. In Spartan, he's made that pursuit the stuff of nightmares. At its essence, Spartan is the story of a kidnapping, with the president's daughter as the victim. Charged with finding her is Robert Scott (Val Kilmer), a career military man of extreme toughness and force of will -- he's one of those guys who'll do anything he's ordered to do, from mop a floor to murder a civilian, and worry about the moral implications never.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
He's starred in 27 films, some of them blockbusters. He's played Moses and Elvis, Doc Holliday and Batman. He bagged $9 million for his latest role in a major release, and no less a luminary than Nicole Kidman says he has "the best lips in the business." Yet if you heard the name Val Kilmer, you might well be unable to summon a clear image to mind. He just might be America's most anonymous major star. "If there is an award for the most unsung leading actor of his generation," writes critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times, "Kilmer should get it."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
If only a few minutes of "At First Sight" rang true.Although based on a true story, this tale of a blind massage therapist whose busybody new girlfriend convinces him to undergo a risky operation to restore his sight comes across as phony as anything Washington has to offer these days.Leads Val Kilmer and Mira Sorvino exhibit hardly any chemistry (though they do share the bond of being inordinately attractive people), the script never opts for a single tug at your heartstrings when a dozen will do, and the supporting players (including Nathan Lane, Kelly McGillis and Bruce Davison)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
There's too much plot and not enough story in "The Saint." It's one of those big, busy things that doesn't quite work: Every two minutes a baffling new character enters, speaks in a heavy Russian accent and tilts the movie in some unfathomable direction. You sit there waiting for something not to happen, for a moment of repose, so you can add it all up.The movie re-creates the famous Leslie Charteris character, the elegant, unflappable, bemused professional thief Simon Templar, played previously by slick cads Roger Moore and George Sanders.
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