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By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Jack Kemp, the Republican vice presidential nominee, yesterday blamed the "worsening situation" in Iraq on President Clinton's "vacillation" and failure to state clear objectives in the Persian Gulf."
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Critics took aim Tuesday at proposed regulations to create a medical marijuana industry in Maryland as a state commission tasked with writing the rules rushed toward a deadline it might not meet. Physicians, patients, advocates and potential growers said the commission did not collect enough public input before drafting the rules - which they said appear to forbid a medical marijuana dispensary anywhere within Baltimore city limits. Final regulations are due in less than three weeks, but the public hearing in Annapolis Tuesday was the commission's first.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1995
The state's highest court has struck down Frederick's curfew, ruling that its wording, which is identical to Baltimore's curfew law, is too vague to be constitutional.The Court of Appeals decision Friday may trigger a legal challenge to Baltimore's year-old law because the ruling warns that a municipality may be liable if it uses an unconstitutional curfew to detain juveniles, legal experts said."What it means is any municipality, like Baltimore, that continues to enforce a curfew that could be unconstitutional is doing so at its own peril," said Deborah A. Jeon, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration is proposing new regulations for the city's rapidly growing food truck industry - setting up zones for the mobile chefs to sell their designer grilled-cheese sandwiches, spicy tacos and decadent cupcakes. The legislation, which a City Council committee will consider Tuesday, was written to encourage the vendors while also limiting where they operate to protect brick-and-mortar restaurants. But some truck operators expressed concern the new limits would hurt their business, and the city's proposal was in flux Monday night.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 5, 2001
"Where are you going," Melisande asks of the older man who has found her lost, alone and frightened in a dark wood and asks her to come with him. "I don't know," the man says. "I'm lost, too." In a way, these lines from Claude Debussy's only completed opera, "Pelleas et Melisande," define the mysterious drama that follows. Everyone in this haunting work is lost; some know it, some don't. By the end, Melisande, on her death bed, says, "I don't know what I know." She's not alone. Some audiences are frustrated by the vagueness of "Pelleas et Melisande"; they crave clear-cut characters, motivations, denouements -- and more direct music to delineate those elements.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 1998
HELENA, Mont. -- Montana's one-of-a-kind daytime speed limit -- written in law as whatever speed is "reasonable and proper" and widely interpreted as wide open -- has been struck down by the Montana Supreme Court, prompting fears that the lack of even the vague limit will lead people to drive at breakneck speeds.In a 4-3 ruling on Wednesday, the court said the law was unconstitutionally vague and did not give drivers fair notice of what speed was fast enough to be illegal."The court held that based on speed alone you cannot cite somebody because they don't reasonably know what speed will violate the law," Beth Baker, Montana's chief deputy attorney general, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Ariel Sabar and Laura Sullivan and Ariel Sabar,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency intercepted two brief messages on Sept. 10 that warned that some kind of event would happen the next day, but the agency did not translate the messages until Sept. 12, a senior intelligence official said yesterday. The messages said in Arabic: "The match begins tomorrow," and "Tomorrow is zero" day. They were detected by the Fort Meade spy agency as its satellites and computers eavesdropped on phone calls and electronic messages worldwide. Intelligence officials cautioned, however, that the messages were so vague that even if the NSA had translated them before the attacks Sept.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Charging toward a showdown on the Senate floor, the White House formally responded yesterday to the House articles of impeachment, contending that they are unconstitutionally vague, illegally worded and completely false.But the president's lawyers declined to file motions that might have delayed the start of opening arguments, scheduled for Thursday."We believe the public has had enough of this," said Joe Lockhart, the White House spokesman. "We're at the final stage of this process, and we can do it two ways: We can do it fairly and expeditiously, or we can do it fairly in a process that's open-ended and takes months and months."
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 1999
Richard W. Vague, the Texas lender who built Wilmington, Del.'s First USA Bank into the biggest credit-card company in the world, has quit in the wake of disappointing earnings and a consumer revolt.First USA's owner, Chicago-based Bank One Corp., said Vague quit "to pursue other interests." Chairman John B. McCoy said it was Vague's decision.The resignation was announced late yesterday, after Bank One's disclosure that its third-quarter earnings dropped because First USA posted flat profit instead of the rapid growth it had previously projected.
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | January 12, 2008
Jennifer Feeney admits it wasn't the best way to break up. She was at an Orioles-Yankees game with a guy she'd been dating for two months. He was from New York, a Yankees buff, and she was a hometown Orioles girl. They often engaged in ribbing, but at the game, her new beau got on a Baltimore-trashing roll. "The entire game, I'm sitting there with my new guy listening to him bash the O's with all the other Yankee fans sitting around us," the 24-year-old Canton resident writes. "He then started going off on how crappy our city is."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Food truck operators packed into Baltimore City Council chambers on Tuesday to testify on an administration bill that would change the way food trucks operate in the city. The food-truck vendors told the Judiciary Committee they are concerned about new parking restrictions and other provisions in the bill, which would turn over turn over the supervision of food trucks to the city's department of general services. But they said their biggest concern was that the legislation was just too vague.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
A judge threw out a criminal charge Tuesday against a Crofton man accused last summer of likening himself to a "joker" and threatening to blow up co-workers. The case raised alarm in the wake of a mass shooting in Colorado but ended quietly after prosecutors were unable to connect the allegations to a specific crime. Police seized guns and ammunition from Neil Edwin Prescott's Crofton home after authorities said he called in threats to a Prince George's County business. He was eventually charged with a single count of telephone misuse, which the judge threw out Tuesday.
NEWS
By J.H. Snider | January 29, 2013
Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney today found Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold guilty on two counts of misconduct for using his executive security detail for personal and political gain. Reports of his sexual escapades and urinary malfunctions have filled the public with disgust. I've attended every day of the trial. Most remarkable for me is the vague law on which the indictment against Mr. Leopold was based. Maryland's state prosecutor based his case on Mr. Leopold's general fiduciary responsibility to the public rather than the violation of clear, specific rules.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
I agree with letter writer Fred Pasek's warning about "vague promises," but this applies to all politicians, Rep. Paul Ryan no less than President Barack Obama ("What Ryan actually said about that GM plant," Sept. 6). Mr. Ryan vaguely promises to preserve Medicare for future generations with schmaltzy references to his mom and grandmother, while his policies clearly eviscerate the program. So much for "vague promises," eh? And anybody who thinks Mr. Ryan was on the up and up with his narrative about the plant closure is surely in denial.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
In Umar Farooq's recent letter concerning Occupy Baltimore ("Occupy Baltimore: The Sun doesn't get it," Oct. 10), he states that The Sun's reporters wouldn't understand the concerns of the protesters. On the contrary, I believe that a reporter for the Sun would understand them all too well. The lament that the janitor who sweeps the stands after a football game makes too little money is nothing new. There's a mechanism by which the wages of that janitor can be raised, and that would be to raise the minimum wage.
NEWS
August 17, 2011
Here's a request from a frustrated voter to all public servants: Will you please be specific? I'm supposed to make informed decisions based on the information public officials provide. But where is that data? What's the address of the Medicare facility they intend to close? The department in the Pentagon where the ax will fall? The name of the government contractor whose contract will end, and the state where his business is located? Tell us exactly what should be stopped and where.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1996
At a 7th District congressional forum in Randallstown this week, each of the 19 candidates who showed up had two minutes to tell the public about his or her background and platform.Most of the more than 150 people in the placard-cluttered audience already had their minds made up, however; they appeared to be campaign workers and volunteers for one candidate or another.Then, three questions were posed to each candidate -- one on crime, one on the controversial Moving To Opportunity federal housing program, and the last on education.
NEWS
By Virginia I. Postrel | December 17, 1990
Los Angeles. THE DEBATE over a proposed law is usually simple. One side wants to ban smoking in restaurants. The other side doesn't. One side wants a higher sales tax. The other side doesn't. One side thinks a bill is good. The other side thinks it's bad.Sometimes, however, the debate gets more complicated. The bill itself -- what it says, what it would mean -- becomes the issue. Its language is vague, or complicated, or both. In such cases, the debate changes from a discussion of issues to a competition for trust.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
Baltimore's gun offender registry is unconstitutional, a Circuit Court judge ruled Friday, calling into question one of the city's signature programs against gun violence. Judge Alfred Nance said the Police Department had "failed or refused to comply" with establishing clear regulations for the registry, which required people convicted of gun crimes to provide addresses and other information with the city every six months for a period of three years. The city judge also called the program, created in 2007, "unconstitutionally vague and overly broad.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
Kenneth D. Perry, accused of fatally shooting two women 12 years ago — one through the top of her head as she likely begged for her life, a prosecutor said — took the stand in his own defense Monday but gave vague and confrontational testimony. The sole exception was his answer to whether he had killed his former girlfriend, LaShawn Jordan, in her Reservoir Hill apartment on July 10, 1998. "Hell no," he replied. Asked if he had killed her friend, Kelly Bunn, who was pregnant, he said, "No. " Perry, 45, who was testifying against his lawyer's advice, invoked his constitutional rights and objected to a prosecutor's question as though he were an attorney.
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