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November 20, 2009
British Columbia's provincial health officer says members of the Canucks jumped the queue when they received their H1N1 vaccinations earlier this week. "If they got the vaccine and they weren't in any of the risk groups as individuals then they were queue-jumping," Dr. Perry Kendall told the Canadian Press. "I don't know why they queue-jumped because they only had to wait a few days." Two members of the Alberta Health Services were fired last month after members of the Flames and their families were given the vaccine ahead of the general public.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Forty health care workers in Mali are receiving a vaccine that could guard against the Ebola virus as a University of Maryland School of Medicine center launches the first human trials of the experimental vaccine. One person received the vaccine Wednesday, two more were expected to receive it Thursday and dozens more are scheduled to follow in the coming weeks. The inoculation was developed at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda using an inert virus that is coated in an Ebola protein, so the body builds immunity to the deadly virus.
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NEWS
August 17, 2011
Susan Reimer wrote a column ("Costly vaccine for painful illness in short supply," Aug. 11), about the medical ailment called shingles. In the column, she notes: 1) "The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has also approved the vaccine for 50-year-olds... " 2) "The Centers for Disease Control has delayed its approval in order to protect the limited supply of the drug for the most vulnerable age group. " Thus, she writes, "without CDC approval it will not be covered by insurance.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
NEWS
By Peter Beilenson | July 21, 2010
This week, Baltimore is privileged to host an international conference sponsored by the preeminent global immunization advocacy organization, the GAVI Alliance. Launched in 2000 at the star-studded gathering of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the GAVI Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation) was founded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the vaccine industry, among others. Pneumococcal disease and rotavirus, a virulent form of diarrhea, are the top two killers of children in the 70 or so most impoverished countries in the world — those where the average income is less than $3 per day. It has traditionally taken 10 to 15 years for vaccines we in America take for granted to reach people in these most impoverished places, with a particularly huge death toll in children under 5 — more than 2 million each year.
NEWS
March 28, 2006
Only the hardest of hearts could deny sympathy to parents whose children suddenly develop autism or some other debilitating ailment for which there is no proven cause. As a society, we know enough about how the world works politically and so little about how chemicals in our environment affect us medically that skepticism of official assurances can be, well, healthy. Yet politicians, in particular, must be careful not to let a natural concern about the safety of vaccines mushroom into a public health emergency, in which fear and ignorance cause far more sickness and death than the vaccines might have.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Maryland's children would be required to get more vaccines before attending school under a proposal being considered by state health officials. But doctors and state health officials said most children are already getting the shots and that they are looking to regulate the process. Under the proposed guidelines, pupils would be required to get a chicken pox booster before starting kindergarten. The chicken pox vaccine is now required to be given to babies. Seventh-graders would be required to get the Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A British drug manufacturer announced yesterday that it has developed what appears to be the most effective bird flu vaccine so far and that it can be made in sufficient quantities for widespread distribution in case of an outbreak. The experimental vaccine, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline PLC, seems to work at low enough doses that it overcomes a key obstacle in earlier vaccines, which required high doses and would have been too cumbersome to produce rapidly in large quantities.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1992
This Beltsville-based company widened its losses during the quarter that ended June 30 but said comparisons with the second quarter of last year are misleading.North American Vaccine made a $2 million gain in the second quarter of last year by selling 200,000 shares of an affiliate, BioChem Pharma Inc.Without that gain, the company would have lost $1.9 million, or 10 cents a share, during the second quarter of 1991.Three months ended 6/30/92........Revenue...... Net...... ..... Share'92..
NEWS
January 20, 2007
Middle school girls in Maryland would be required to get vaccines for a virus that causes cervical cancer under legislation being considered in Annapolis. Several state senators have introduced a bill to require the shots for sixth-grade girls. The shot would prevent a common, sexually transmitted virus that causes about 70 percent of the cases of cervical cancer. Other states also are considering a requirement for the vaccine. Supporters say the vaccine, approved last summer for girls as young as 9, is a no-brainer because it could eliminate female cases of human papilloma virus, or HPV. The virus can also cause genital lesions or warts.
HEALTH
By Melissa Healy | August 28, 2014
The National Institutes of Health has announced the first clinical trial of a vaccine to protect healthy people from infection by the Ebola virus, which is responsible for an estimated 1,550 deaths throughout West Africa. NIH Director Francis Collins on Thursday called the human safety trials, which are to start next week in Bethesda, the latest in a series of the "extraordinary measures to accelerate the pace of vaccine clinical trials" for the public health emergency in Africa.
NEWS
William Chin | August 27, 2014
This month more than 50 million American children will report to our public and elementary school systems to begin another school year, bringing with them not only new books, laptops, smartphones and iPads, but also their parents' hopes and dreams for a bright and healthy future. Unfortunately - and often all too tragically - a growing percentage of students enter or return to school without the most important back to school requirement: vaccinations. These students are part of a new generation vulnerable to childhood diseases that have long since been under control but are now making a comeback due to parental misinformation and bad science.
HEALTH
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Students entering kindergarten and seventh grade in Maryland will have to add new shots to their lists of things to do before heading back to school this month. Vaccines required for all school-age children in Maryland include tetanus, diphtheria, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, varicella (chickenpox), meningitis and pertussis (whooping cough). Under the new requirements, kindergarten pupils must get an additional dose of the chickenpox vaccine, which means kindergarten students will have a total of two chickenpox vaccines upon starting kindergarten.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
State health officials are reminding parents to get their kids their vaccinations before school starts. Some of the requirements are new, and students can be kept out of the classroom if they do not have the proper shots. “We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,” said Dr. Laura Herrera, deputy secretary for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Public Health Services. “We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.” Students entering kindergarten now must have had two chickenpox (varicella)
NEWS
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Public health officials have just one tactic to battle the unrelenting Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa - quarantine - but as the disease continues to spread, scientists in Maryland are among those close to discovering other weapons. Baltimore companies Profectus BioSciences and Paragon Bioservices, as well as researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick in Frederick and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have been part of efforts that have shown a handful of Ebola vaccine candidates are effective in monkeys.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2014
Researchers in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and begun testing a vaccine that can “reprogram” pancreatic cancers to potentially make them more treatable. Pancreatic cancer is among the most fatal types of cancer. It isn't often caught early and generally becomes resistant to standard chemotherapy drugs. This study was conducted on those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas , the most common form of the cancer and one that gives patients just a five percent chance of surviving five years.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 27, 2006
A new vaccine to prevent painful attacks of shingles in people 60 and older has received federal approval and is expected to be on the market in about a week. The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that it has cleared the way for Merck & Co. to begin shipping the vaccine, called Zostavax. A five-year study showed it can protect about half the people who get it from developing shingles, a rash that can lead to a more devastating painful condition, post-herpetic neuralgia. As many as 1 million Americans develop shingles each year, according to the National Institutes of Health, and about 20 percent of them progress to post-herpetic neuralgia, which can cause excruciating pain for months or years.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
Between 5,000 and 6,000 doctors, nurses and other health care workers in Maryland would be vaccinated against the deadly smallpox virus under a plan submitted this week to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The plan calls for the vaccination of about 5,000 hospital workers across the state, Arlene Stephenson, acting secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said yesterday. Smaller hospitals might vaccinate teams of 50 doctors and nurses, she said, while larger ones might vaccinate as many as 250. About 80 six-person "public health teams" at local health departments and at the state health department also would be vaccinated under the plan.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Baltimore County residents can get pets vaccinated against rabies at low-cost clinics this spring. Each vaccine - available for dogs, cats and ferrets - costs $8. The clinics, sponsored by the county health department, are scheduled to be held through June 14 at nine sites throughout the county, county health officials said. To get the vaccination, animals must be at least 12 weeks old and must be on a leash or in a carrier. Residents may pay by cash or check. A complete schedule of the clinics is available at baltimorecountymd.gov/rabiesclinics.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Harford County Health Department will sponsor a series of rabies vaccination clinics later this month and early next month for dogs, cats and ferrets that are three months and older. Recognizing the very important public health value of low cost rabies vaccination of companion pets to prevent the spread of rabies, the health department has kept the fee for the vaccination at the very low cost of $5 per animal. "We are delighted to once again offer these $5 pet rabies vaccinations to the public.
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