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Uss Constellation

FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2004
It's been more than a century since the three masts of the 186-foot Constellation loomed over historic Annapolis. And if all goes as planned, the historic sloop of war built in 1854 as the Navy's last all-sail fighting ship will return to Annapolis on Tuesday, tying up along the Naval Academy's Farragut Seawall after being towed there from its permanent berth in the Inner Harbor. The Constellation's six-day visit marks the first time the vessel has left local waters since 1955, and in recent years, its perambulations have taken it no farther than the Key Bridge.
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NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
As it glided slowly away from its berth yesterday morning, the Constellation - the antique sloop-of-war moored in Baltimore's Inner Harbor - created quite a scene for an old Civil War ship. Cannons cracked. Crowds waved and cheered goodbye. Red, white and blue confetti rained down on its wooden deck. At 150 years old, the Constellation left Baltimore at 9:15 a.m. for a six-hour journey to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis - its first trip there in 112 years. Although it had to be pulled by four Vane Brothers Co. tugboats, the majestic frigate proved that despite everything, it's still seaworthy.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
Life at sea could be hard in the 1860s, but Capt. Henry Schreiner Stellwagen's quarters on the USS Constellation were pretty cushy. He slept in a bunk rather than a hammock hung from hooks. He bathed in a small tub instead of washing with deck hoses as crewmen had to do. And while the sailors' bathroom was on a plank suspended under the bowsprit, Stellwagen had his very own "seat of ease." The captain's spacious cabin was his domain. He dined there, did paperwork, called misbehaving underlings on the carpet.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
Retired men have a passion for watching the labor of men who have not yet put work behind them. And the misty riverbanks of Fort McHenry are a magnet for retired men.Every morning, a bunch of old-timers shows up to walk the grounds (many on doctor's orders, although they've yet to see a doctor out for a walk); to talk about stuff that people don't seem to care about anymore; and to keep a close eye on life inside Baltimore's star fort.Favorite topics include visiting geese from Canada, middle-of-the-workday lovers tumbling beneath trees along the sea wall, and which version of the American flag may be flying on any given day. Their current obsession: the snail's pace of construction of a 60,000-square-foot maintenance shed a stone's throw from the statue of Orpheus.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
A fit and spiffy Constellation came home yesterday, welcomed by the cheers and applause of thousands who lined the promenades along the Inner Harbor.Its flags and streamers snapping in a southwest wind, the 1854 warship tied up at the end of Constellation Dock at 11: 45 a.m., ending 2 1/2 years of repairs and a careful restoration to its Civil War appearance."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1996
Donald F. Stewart, whose former role as director of the warship Constellation has been both praised and criticized, died Sunday of lung cancer at Fairfax (Va.) General Hospital. The Herndon, Va., resident was 67.Mr. Stewart, who made his home in Virginia after leaving Baltimore 10 years ago, was known for his flamboyant maritime dress and self-declared title of Rear Admiral of the Maryland Naval Militia, which he created.He was noted for his vigorous promotion of claims that the Constellation's lineage dated to 1797.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The sixth annual Orioles Pet Calendar benefitting the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) will go on sale August 12, and five players will be on-hand to sign calendars at the shelter that day. J.J. Hardy, Tommy Hunter, David Lough, Bud Norris, and Matt Wieters will visit BARCS from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on August 12 to sign calendars bought that day. Those attending must buy their calendars on-site for autographs. There will be free parking at Lot D on the south side of M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
Constellation berths at Academy In 1879, The Sun reported that the USS Constellation arrived in Annapolis on Aug. 29 as a training ship for the U.S. Naval Academy. The 179-foot ship had been commissioned in 1855 to patrol the West African coast for slave trader ships. Now the Constellation was anchored in the Severn River and had a berth for Rear Adm. George B. Balch, the academy superintendent. He had sailed with the storied vessel for 10 days to examine its workings. Midshipmen learned the ropes on it until 1893.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Duel | November 22, 2001
Civil War Santa Celebrate Christmas Civil-War-style this weekend on the USS Constellation, Pier 1, at the Inner Harbor. A Civil War Santa, dressed in red, white and blue, will share his own memories of wartime celebrations of the holiday as well as written accounts by sailors, soldiers and civilians. Living-history interpreter Kevin Rawlings portrays Santa. In addition, visitors young and old are welcome to share their Christmas wish list with Santa in the historic captain's cabin and enjoy refreshments.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
Owen J. Nugent Sr., a retired consultant for the Crown Cork and Seal Co., died Saturday after a brief illness at the Stella Maris Hospice. He had moved to the hospice from Govans more than two years ago.A Mass of Christian burial for Mr. Nugent, who was 98, will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrowat St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 5502 York Road in Govans.He retired in 1961 from Crown Cork and Seal, where he had served as foreman of the cork grinding department earlier in his 38-year career.
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