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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 6, 1992
The reasons PCs outsell the Mac 10-to-1 are numerous, but let's focus on two key issues: choice and price.All sorts of people need to use personal computers, and they have all sorts of requirements, budgets and experience levels. The PC marketplace offers any imaginable combination of price, service and selection; the Mac marketplace is dictated by Apple. PC users can buy a preconfigured Windows system with no installation needed or build one from scratch. There is a choice!A mildly experienced PC user willing to install Windows (it takes about 20 minutes)
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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | April 5, 1993
Last week, the Microsoft Corp. introduced DOS 6.0, the latest major revision of the most widely used personal computer operating system software.The new DOS adds a variety of new features, including data compression, that until now have been available only as add-on utilities from other companies.For people who are buying a new computer, some form of DOS 6.0 will probably come already installed on the hard disk. That makes the decision to use DOS 6.0 easy. And for most veteran PC users, the new DOS 6.0 features are an attractive bargain.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration reports there are 1.7 million regular users of cocaine, a huge increase over recent government survey estimates.But government officials insist the number of cocaine user, including heavy users, is declining. They say the new figure is not surprising and merely takes into account users missed by the surveys.The major government indicator of drug use has been the national household survey of drug abuse, done for the Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and a leading Democratic senator have reached a tentative agreement that could salvage the governor's No. 1 environmental initiative, the lawmaker said last night. Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, who had shelved Ehrlich's proposal for a surcharge on water bills to pay for sewage plant upgrades, said she was invited to a 4 p.m. meeting yesterday in the governor's office to end a weeklong deadlock over the proposal known as the "flush tax." The Baltimore County legislator, who is chairwoman of the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, said she and Ehrlich reached an agreement on applying the charge to users of septic systems.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Sam Sessa and and Meredith Cohn and Sam Sessa and and,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com and sam.sessa@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
David Sturgill has posted his cell phone number, personal e-mail address and work information on his Facebook page and now wonders whether that was a good idea. The 32-year-old, who lives in Fells Point, has been using the social networking Internet site for two years, but since he learned this week of the company's change in its terms of use, he worries about what Facebook could do with the information. Facebook quietly changed the terms this month but users became aware of it - and some were outraged by it - when the popular Consumerist blog posted about it this week and got tens of thousands of hits.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 4, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal judge has ordered Google to turn over to Viacom its records of which users watched which videos on YouTube, the Web's largest video site by far. The order raised concerns among YouTube users and privacy advocates that the video viewing habits of tens of millions of people could be exposed. But Google Inc. and Viacom Inc. said they were hoping to come up with a way to protect the anonymity of the site's visitors. Viacom also said that the information would be safeguarded by a protective order restricting access to the data to outside lawyers, who will use it solely to press Viacom's $1 billion copyright lawsuit against Google.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Howard County officials are launching a system to send urgent messages directly from police and fire departments, as well as select information about other county services via text messages or email. The notification service, NotifyMeHoward, will allow county officials to provide emergency notifications from the National Weather Service and public safety officials, but it will also let subscribers customize which county agencies they receive information from. Users can choose to receive information on recreation and parks programs, public works road projects or government news releases — all from the same system, beginning Tuesday.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Diana K. Sugg and Elaine Tassy and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF jTC Sun staff writer Jean Thompson contributed to this article | May 12, 1996
A drug sold on East Baltimore streets that is blamed for three deaths and more than 50 overdoses has created a health and law enforcement emergency similar to one that began earlier this week in Philadelphia. The drug, offered as heroin, is sold in capsules for $10 or less a dose. But, unlike in Philadelphia, where the drug was sold under the nicknames "homicide" or "super Buick," doses contain no heroin or cocaine, authorities said.In Philadelphia, authorities reported more than 100 overdoses last week, but no deaths.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp. ran into "The Revenge of the Nerds" yesterday as a handful of Internet users persuaded the Maryland Public Service Commission to defer action on the telephone company's proposed pricing plan for its digital phone service.The two-week delay gives Bell Atlantic's opponents critical time to mount their opposition to the proposed rate structure for the high-speed service known as ISDN, or integrated services digital network, which the company has called "a critical initial on-ramp to the information superhighway."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
Worried about hackers sneaking into your computer, ruining files and lighting out with your most private documents? Maybe you should be more worried about the nosy software you invite in through the front door. "Spyware," as it's known in the trade, is often attached to free programs downloaded from the Internet. It can collect information about your browsing habits and secretly ship it back to advertisers or marketers. They, in turn, may use it to send you targeted ads, or sell it to others.
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